Core II

Soka University of America
Core 200-11 (1014), Spring, 2017
TuTh 1:00PM-2:30 PM Gan202
#core2sua
CORE II
The spirit of the corrupt mob said to the objects: I am yours, take me! and hurled itself into the river of objects, let itself be swept along by them and perished in the flood. 
G.W.F. Hegel
INTRODUCTION TO THE COURSE
This course examines how the central questions posed in Core I continue to be addressed in a contemporary context. Through readings on the environment, historical development of human societies, current issues of social inequality, as well as personal and group identities and relationships, Core II explores some of the major issues facing humanity today.
Thomas Piketty’s Capital in the Twenty-First Century (2013) ushered in a wave of articles around the world that gave legitimacy to what millions of people had been discussing for years- the steadfast growth of inequality in their communities. The consequence of the income gap between the wealthy and the poor is felt with greater intensity today, as we witness the rise of repressive regimes around the globe. In this course, we will be exploring inequality and state-repression as a way to reflect upon the strengths and weaknesses of our social institutions. I hope the readings I have chosen will help us develop theoretical approaches to analyze the root causes of the increase in inequality and its dreadful consequences.
RECOMMENDED BOOK
Hobsbawm, Eric. Age of Extremes: The Short Twentieth Century: 1914-1991. New
York: Vintage, 1996.
LABOR
   Daily class reflections: You must buy a pack of flashcards and bring them with you to every class. At the end of each class period, I will give you 10 minutes to reflect on the reading/s and discussion. On your flashcards, please write down a few notes on the topic of discussion and/or transcribe one or two quotes from the readings (make sure you include first and last name of the author, title of the essay or book, and page number).
   Complete common readings and any additional readings assigned specifically to you
   Attendance and participation at film screenings
   3 Short Papers
   Abstract and outline of your final presentation
   Final presentation
   Final Paper
ABBREVIATIONS
CR    Common Readings- Every student needs to do the reading and prepare for
class discussion
ARS   Assigned Reading to 1 student: The student who is assigned the reading
must prepare a 10-minute presentation on the reading and prepare to
engage with other readings or films scheduled for that day.
COURSE SCHEDULE

Tuesday, February 7th 1:00- 2:30 p.m.
Inoue, Asao B. “Reading as a Mindful Practice.” (CR) 3 pages
Yates, Michael D. “Measuring Global Inequality.” Monthly Review. (CR) 9
pages
Lenin, Vladimir. “Communism and the East: Theses on the National and Colonial
Questions.”Lenin Anthology. (ASR) 4 pages
Thursday, February 9th
Singer, Peter. “Common Objections to Giving.” The Life You Can Save: Acting
Now to End World Poverty. (CR) 10 pages
Stiglitz, Joseph E. “Inequality Is Not Inevitable.” (pgs 300-305). The Great
Divide: Unequal Societies and What We Can Do About Them. (ARS) 18 pages
Screening (in class): The Queen of Versailles. Dir. Lauren Greenfield, 2012.
Saturday, February 11th
Extra credit opportunity: Brothers Hypnotic. Dir. Reuben Atlas and Sam
Pollard, 2013. Black Box Theater, 5:30 p.m.
Tuesday February 14th
Rousseau, Jean Jacques. “A Dissertation On The Origin And Foundation Of The
Inequality Of Mankind: First Part.” (9-23) Discourse on Inequality.  
(CR) 15 pages
Rousseau, Jean Jacques. “A Dissertation On The Origin And Foundation Of The
Inequality Of Mankind.” (23-38) Discourse on Inequality.(ARS) 15
pages
Thursday February 16th
Kaplan, Jerry. “America, Home of the Brave.” Humans Need Not Apply: A Guide
to Wealth and Work in the Age of Artificial Intelligence. (CR)  [Last
chapter in the PDF] 20 pages
Lyotard, Jean-Francois. Universal History and Cultural Differences. The
Lyotard Reader. (ARS) 5 pages
Prompt for First Short Paper
Tuesday February 21st
Engels, Friedrich. “Competition,” “Irish Immigration,” and “Results.” The
Conditions of the Working Class in England (CR). 25 pages.
Proudhon, Pierre-Joseph. “A Self-Portrait,” and “Property is Theft.” No Gods
No Masters, ed. Daniel Guerin. (ARS). 9 pages
Lenin, Vladimir. “Two Resolutions on Party Policy.” Lenin Anthology (ARS). 4
pages
First Short Paper Due- Inequality.
Thursday February 23rd
Washington, Booker T. Chapters I, VI, VIII, X. Up From Slavery (CR). 25
pages.
Community Cinema Screening. 7 p.m. Pauling 216: The Bad Kids, dir. Keith Fulton & Lou Pepe. This is a mandatory screening!
Tuesday February 28th [away Conference]
Baldwin, James. “Preface to the 1984 Edition,” “Many Thousands Gone.” Notes
on a Native Son. (CR). 16 pages.
Screening in class: I’m Not Your Negro. Dir. Raoul Peck, 2016. [if
available] if not, James Baldwin: The Price of The Ticket. Dir. Karen Thorsen. 1990
Thursday March 2nd [away Conference]
Khatchadourian, Raffi. “Edward Burtynsky’s quest to photograph a changing
planet.” The New Yorker, December 19th & 26, 2016. (CR)
Hayek, F.A. “Individualism and Collectivism.” The Road to Serfdom. (ARS) 5
pages.
Prompt for Second Short Paper.
Tuesday March 7th [away Conference]
Dewey, John. The Live Creature. Art As Experience. (CR). 10 pages.
Screening (watch on your own):  Land Without Bread. Dir. Luis Buñuel, 1933.
Wednesday, March 8th [away Conference]
Mandatory event!!
Sancutary in the Age of Crimmigration. Gues Speaker, Ana Muniz.
6:00-7:00 p.m. Pauling Hall 216.
Thursday March 9th [away Conference]
Second Short Paper Due- Analysis of Land Without Bread.
Assignment, pick a movie on reserve in the library and watch it over the weekend.
La hora de los hornos [The Hour of the Furnaces]. Dir. Grupo de Cine
Liberación. 1st part only. [on reserve in the Library]
The Battle of Algiers. Dir. Gillo Pontecorvo, 1966.
The Exterminating Angel. Dir. Luis Buñuel, 1962.
Nostalgia for the Light. Dir. Patricio Guzmán. 2000 [on reserve in the
Library]
The Selfish Giant. Dir. Clio Barnard, 2013. [on reserve in the Library]
Up the Yangtze. Dir. Yu Chang, 2007. [on reserve in the Library]
Ici et Ailleurs. Dir. Dziga Vertov Group (Jean-Luc Godard), 1976. [on reserve
in the Library]
Tuesday March 14th
Marti, Jose. Selected Writings. (CR). 5 pages.
Flores Magon, Ricardo et. al. Reading of the Mexican Revolution. The Mexico
Reader. (ARS). 10 pages.
Thursday March 16th
Anna Muniz Talk.
Nietzche, Friedrich. “Book One,”. The Gay Science (selection). (CR). 23 pages.
Tuesday March 21st
Spring Break  
Thursday March 23rd
Spring Break  

Luxemburg, Rosa. “The Junius Pamphlet The Crisis in German Social Democracy.” Rosa Luxemburg Reader. (CR) 15 pages.
Tuesday March 28th
Menchú, Rigoberta.”An eight-year old agricultural worker,” “Death of her
little brother..,” “A maid in the Capital,”. I, Rigoberta Menchu: An Indian Woman in Guatemala. (CR). 23 pages
Black Lives Matter Statement: Guiding Principles. (ARS) 3 pages
Garza, Alicia. “A Herstory of the Movement.” 4 pages
Thursday March 30th
Du Bois, W.E.B. 1. Our Spiritual Strivings. 3. Of Mr. Booker T. Washington and Others. The Souls of Black Folk (CR). 11 pages. Screening (in class): Now. Dir. Santiago Alvarez.
Tuesday April 4th
Outlaw, Lucius T. (Jr.) “Against the Grain of Modernity: The Politics of Difference and the Conservation of ‘Race’.” On Race and Philosophy. (CR) 23 pages.
Biko, Steve. Foreword. “Black Souls,” “The Definitions…” I Write I like. (ARS) 12 pages.
Thursday April 6th
Arendt, Hannah. Chapter 5.”The Political Emancipation of the Bourgeoisie.”
      The Origins of Totalitarianism. (CR) 35 pages
Arendt, Hannah. Chapter 11. “The Totalitarian Movement.” The Origins of
Totalitarianism. (341- 364) (ARS) 24 pages
Arendt, Hannah. Chapter 11. “The Totalitarian Movement.” The Origins of
Totalitarianism. (364-388) (ARS) 25 pages
“Totalitarianism in the Age of Trump: Lessons from Hannah Arendt,” The
Guardian. February 2, 2017.
Tuesday April 11th
Améry, Jean. At The Mind’s Limits. (CR). 21 pages
Screening (in class): Night and Fog. Dir. Alain Resnais, 1956.
Thursday April 13th
Klemperer, Victor. “1935.” I Will Bear Witness: A Diary Of the Nazi Years
(1933-1941). (CR). 20 pages
Screening (in class): Triumph of the Will. Dir. Leni Riefenstahl, 1935.
Prompt Third Short Paper
Tuesday April 18th
West, Cornel. “Race And Modernity.” The Cornel West Reader. (CR). 34 pages
Thursday April 20th
Fanon. “Colonial War And Mental Disorders.” The Wretched of the Earth.
(249-280) 31 pages (CR)
Fanon. “Colonial War And Mental Disorders.” The Wretched of the Earth.
(280-310) 31 pages (ARS)
Screening (in class): Concerning Violence: Nine Scenes from the
Anti-Imperialistic Self-Defense. Dir. Goran Hugo Olsson, 2014. [Kanopy streaming]
Community Cinema Screening. 7 p.m. Pauling 216: National Bird, dir. Sonia Kennebeck. This is a mandatory screening!
Tuesday April 25th
Desnoes, Edmundo. “Inconsolable Memories. A Cuban View of the Missile Crisis.” (CR). 3 pages.
Screening (in class): The War Game. Dir. Peter Watkins, 1965.
Thursday April 27th
Screening (in class): Enron: The Smartest Boys in the Room. 2nd part.
Third short paper due.
Tuesday May 2nd
Pachedo, José Emilio. Battles in the Desert. 19 pages (CR)
Thursday May 4th
Baudrillard, Jean. “Catastrophe Management.” “The Dance of Fossils.” The Illusion of the End. (CR). 6 pages.
Outline of Final Paper due (1-2 pages)
Tuesday May 9th
Student Presentations
Thursday May 11t
Student Presentations
Tuesday May 16th
Study Day
May 17th- 23rd (Final Exams)
Final essay due by midnight (Date to be announced)

Bibliography
Arendt, H. (1979). The Political Emancipation of the Bourgeoisie. The origins Of Totalitarianism (pp. 122-157). San Diego: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich.
Baldwin, James. “Preface to the 1984 Edition,” “Many Thousands Gone.” Notes on a Native Son. (CR). 16 pages.
Baudrillard, J. (1994). The illusion of the end. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press.
Biko, S., & Stubbs, A. (1979). I write what I like. New York: Harper & Row.
Desnoes, Edmundo. (2004) “Inconsolable Memories. A Cuban View of the Missile Crisis.” Duke Press.
Dewy, John. (1934) The Live Creature. Art As Experience. The Penguin Group.
Du_Bois, W. E. (1961). The souls of black people: essays and sketches. Greenwich (Conn.): Fawcett Publications.
Engels, F. (1886). The condition of the working class in England. Great Britain: Penguin Books.
Fanon. (1963).  “Colonial War And Mental Disorders.” The Wretched of the Earth. Grove Press.
Flores Magon, Ricardo et. Al. (2003) Reading of the Mexican Revolution. The Mexico Reader. Duke Press.
Garza, Alicia. (October 7, 2014). A History of the #BlackLivesMAtter Movement by Alicia Garza. The Feminist Wire. Retrieved from http://www.thefeministwire.com/2014/10/blacklivesmatter-2/.
Guérin, D., & Sharkey, P. (2005). No gods, no masters. Edinburgh, Scotland: AK Press.
Hegel, G. W. F. (1977). Phenomenology of Spirit. London: Oxford University Press.
Inoue, A.B. (n.d). Reading as a Mindful Practice [Scholarly project].
Kadourian, Raffi. “Edward Burtynsky’s quest to photograph a changing planet.” The New Yorker, December 19th & 26, 2016
Kaplan, J. (2015). Humans need not apply: a guide to wealth and work in the age of artificial intelligence. New Haven: Yale University Press.
Khatchadourian, R. (2016, December 19). Edward Burtynsky’s quest to photography: a changing planet. The New Yorker, 80-87.
Klemperer, V. (1999). 1935. I will bear witness: a diary of the Nazi years 1933-1941 (pp. 108-   145). New York: Modern Library.
Lenin, V. I., & Tucker, R. C. (1975). The Lenin Anthology. New York: W.W. Norton & Company.
Luxemburg, R., Hudis, P., & Anderson, K. (2004). The Junius Pamphlet: The Crisis in German Social Democracy. The Rosa Luxemburg reader (pp. 313-341). New York: Monthly Review Press.
Lyotard, J. F. (1989). Universal History and Cultural Differences. In A. Benjamin (Ed.), The Lyotard Reader. Cambridge: Basil Blackwell.
Martí, J., Allen, E., & Echevarría, R. G. (2002). José Martí: selected writings. New York: Penguin Books.
Menchú, R., & Burgos-Debray. E. (1984). I, Rigoberta Menchú: an Indian woman in Guatemala. London: Verso.
Outlaw, L.T. (1996). On race and philosophy. New Yorker: Routledge.
Pacheco, José Emilio. (2001). Battles in the Desert. Ediciones Era.
Proudhon, Pierre-Joseph. (2005). “Self-Portrait,” and “Property is Theft.” No Gods No Masters. AK Press.  
Rousseau, Jean Jacques. “A Dissertation On The Origin And Foundation OF The Inequality Of Mankind: First Part.”
Singer, Petter (2009). Common Objections to Giving, The Life You Can Save (pp. 21-41). New York: Random House.
Stiglitz, J. E. (2015). The great divide: unequal societies and what we can do about them. New York: W.W. Norton & Company.
Washington, B. T. (2010). Up from slavery, an autobiography. New York: New American Library.
West, Cornel. (1999). “Race And Modernity.” The Cornel West Reader. Basic Civitas Books.
Yates, M. D. (2016, November 1). Measuring Global Inequality. Monthly Review. Retrieved from http://monthlyreview.org

Digital Humanities

Tomás Crowder-Taraborrelli
Humanities 290-01 (1169) Digital Humanities, Spring 2017
#digitalmediasua
DIGITAL HUMANITIES

When machines and computers, profit motives and property rights, are considered more important than people, the giant triplets of racism, extreme materialism and militarism are incapable of being conquered
Martin Luther King, The Riverside Church in New York, 1967
…nothing is so frightening as a labyrinth with no center.
Borges, citing G.K. Chesterton
INTRODUCTION
This course explores the intersection between digital technology and media with academic research in the Humanities. In recent years, this area of studies has flourished into one of the most popular and well-funded fields of inquiry. The corporate takeover of the Internet has prompted researchers to reflect on the impact that social networks, digital archiving, computer interfaces, and online communication, has had and will have on academic research, publishing, and social relations in general. Most authors we will be reading and discussing this semester seem to agree that the each year the arrival of new technologies in the consumer market appears to be intensifying. These new technologies both threaten and enhance our understanding of the capacities of human beings to remember, preserve, reproduce and represent reality. I hope that this course will grant us the opportunity to better understand the challenges and high hopes that digital technologies bring to the global community.
ASSIGNMENTS:
   All assignments for this course must be uploaded to a blog. Your blog should be dedicated only to this course. You can upload images, videos, links, and files to your blog. Please keep in mind that all your assignments need to be uploaded by the deadline(10%)
   Complete common readings and any additional readings assigned specifically to you(20%)
   Attendance and participation at film screenings (20%)
   8 writing assignments (15% each)
   Abstract and outline of your final presentation (10%)
   Final presentation (10%)
   Final Paper (15%)
ABBREVIATIONS
CR    Common Readings- Every student needs to do the reading and prepare for
class discussion
ARS   Assigned Reading to 1 student: The student who is assigned the reading
must prepare a 5-10 minutes presentation on the reading and prepare to
engage with other readings or films scheduled for that day.
COURSE SCHEDULE

Tuesday, February 7th
Digital Humanities, why should we care?
Liu, Alan. The Meaning of Digital Humanities: What is the meaning of the
digital humanities to the humanities? (CR)11 pages
Mande, Joe. How I Learned To Game Twitter. The New Yorker (CR)
The World Unplugged (ARS) 4 pages
Thursday February 9th
Digital humanities discussion continues…
Golumbia, David. “Death of a Discipline.” A Journal of Feminist Cultural
Studies. (CR) 17 pages
Mone,Gregory. What’s Next For Digital Humanities?: New Computational Tools
Spur Advances In An Evolving Field,” Communications of the ACM. (ARS) 2
Pages
Visualizing Venice
Tuesday February 14th
Computer history: The perils of standardization
Ceruzzi, Paul. Introduction and “The Early History of Software 1952-1968. A
History of Modern Computing. (CR). 22 pages.
Ceruzzi, Paul. “The Personal Computer, 1972-1977.” A History of Modern
Computing. (207-221)(ARS) 15 pages
Ceruzzi, Paul. “The Personal Computer, 1972-1977.” A History of Modern
Computing. (221-241)(ARS) 20 pages
Thursday February 16th
Negroponte, Nicholas. “Commingled Bits.” Being Digital. (CR) 13 pages
Negroponte, Nicholas. “Where People and Bits Meet.” Being Digital. (ARS) 14
pages
Negroponte, Nicholas. “Less is More.” Being Digital.(ARS) 11 pages
The Entire History of You. Black Mirror [sequence screened in class]
Tuesday February 21st
Manovich, Lev. “Principles of New Media.” The Language of New Media. (CR) 22
pages.   
Manovich, Lev. “What New Media Is Not.” The Language of New Media. (ARS) 13
pages.
Cadwalladr, Carole. “Google, Democracy And The Truth About Internet Search.”
The Guardian. (ARS) 11 pages
Discussion of The Entire History of You. Black Mirror.
Thursday February 23rd [away conference]
Digital technology and education
Blikstein, Paulo. “Travels In Troy With Freire”.(CR) 26 pages
Freire, Paulo. “Chapter 1.  Society In Transition. Education for
Critical Consciousness. (ARS) 8 pages.
Negroponte, Nicholas. “Hard Fun.” Being Digital. (ASR). 10 pages
7 p.m. Pauling 216. Community Cinema Event: The Bad Kids, dir. Keith Fulton & Lou Pepe.
Tuesday February 28th [away conference]
No class to make up for mandatory screening Feb. 23rd.
e, Lee and Barry Wellman. “Interlude: A Day in a Connected Life,”
Networked: The New Social Operating System.(CR) 12 pages
Thursday March 2nd [away conference]
Prompts for first paper
Assignment: Pick a movie on reserve in the library and watch it over the weekend.
Black Mirror. [Pick an episode. Streaming Netflix].
We Are Legion. The Story of Hacktivists. Brian Knappenberger, 2012. [on reserve in the Library]
Citizenfour. Dir. Laura Poitras, 2014. [on reserve in the Library]
Tuesday March 7th [away conference]
van Dijck, Jose. Mediated Memories as a Conceptual Too. Mediated Memories in the Digital Age. 26 pages (CR)
Thursday March 9th [away conference]
Watch The Internet’s Own Boy: The Story of Aron Swartz. Dir. Brian Knappenberger (2014).
Tuesday March 14th
Marwick, Alice. “Introduction.” Status Update: Celebrity, publicity, and
branding in the social media age. (CR) 19 pages
Marwick, Alice. “Self-Branding.” Status Update: Celebrity, publicity, and
branding in the social media age. (163-181) (ARS) 18 pages (Presentation)
Marwick, Alice. “Self-Branding.” Status Update: Celebrity, publicity, and
branding in the social media age. (181-204)(ARS) 23 pages (Presentation)
First essay due at 10 a.m.
Thursday March 16th
Segovia, Kathryn and Jeremy N. Bailenson.”Identity Manipulation What Happens
When Identity Presentation is Not Truthful.” The Social Net: Understanding our online behavior. Ed. Yair Amichai-Hamburger. (CR) 13 pages
Margalit, Ruth. “Should Auschwitz Be A Site For Selfies?” The New
Yorker, 2014. (ARS)3 pages
Short film of the Yolocaust (‘Holocaust Selfies’)
“Selfies at Auschwitz: When Tourism Destroys the Meaning of Memory.”
Yolocaust Video
Tuesday March 21st
Galloway, Alexander R. “Introduction: The Computer as a Mode of Mediation.”
The Interface Effect. (CR) 24 pages
Galloway, Alexander R. ”Software and Ideology.” The Interface Effect. (ARS)
23 pages.
Doulas Engelbart Demo (clip screened in class)
Thursday March 23rd
Thomas, Douglas. “(Not) Hackers: Subculture, Style, and Media Incorporation.”
Hacker Culture. (CR) 31 pages
Tuesday March 28th
Can machines think? AI
Kaplan, Jerry. “Introduction: Welcome to the Future,” “America, Land of the
Free Shipping.” Humans Need Not Apply: A Guide to Wealth and Work in the Age of Artificial Intelligence.(CR) 14 pages
Kaplan, Jerry. “America, Land of the Free Shipping.” Humans Need Not Apply: A
Guide to Wealth and Work in the Age of Artificial Intelligence.(ARS) 11 pages
Thursday March 30th
Herrera, Linda. “Wired Youth Rise,” Revolution in the Age of Social Media:
The Egyptian Popular Insurrection and the Internet. (1-24) (CR) 24 pages
Herrera, Linda. “Cyberdissident Diplomacy,” Revolution in the Age of Social
Media: The Egyptian Popular Insurrection and the Internet. (1-24) (ARS)
22 pages
Gerbaudo, Paolo. “Friendly Reunions: Social Media and The choreography Assembly.” Tweets and the Streets. Social Media and Contemporary Activism. (CR) 30 pages.
Gerbaudo, Paolo. “Introduction.” Tweets and the Streets. Social Media and Contemporary Activism.(ARS) 17 pages.
Heller, Nathan. “The Failure of Facebook Democracy.” The New Yorker, 2016. (ARS) 4 pages
Tuesday April 4th
Baym, Nancy K. “Communities and Networks,” “New Relationships, new Selves.”
Personal Connections in the Digital Age. (CR) 31 pages
      In Real Life, dir. Beeban Kidron, 2014 (sequence screened in class). 0.:50.
Kirsch, Adam. “Technology is Taking Over English Departments: False Promise of the Digital Humanities.” The New Republic.
Thursday April 6th
Networked communities
Baym, Nancy K. “Communities and Networks,” “New Relationships, new Selves.”
Personal Connections in the Digital Age. (CR) 31 pages (continue)
Vaidhyanathan, Siva Introd. “The Googlization of Memory: Information
Overload, Filters, and the Fracturing of Knowledge,” The Googlization
of Everything And Why We Should Worry. (ASR). 13 pages
Tuesday April 11th
Network communities (continued)
Rainie, Lee and Barry Wellman. “Networked Families.” Networked:
The New Social Operating System. (CR) 24 pages.
Baudrillard, Jean. “The Ecstasy of Communication,” The Ecstasy of
Communication. (ARS) 12 pages
“Meet Erica- Erica Man Made”
Tuesday April 13th
Library workshop with Helen Alexander and Jan Fandrich
Morville, Peter. “The Sociosemantic Web.” Ambient Findability. (CR) 35 pages.
Tuesday April 18th
Wikipedia
Shirky, Clay. “Personal Motivation Meets Collaborative Production.”
      (ARS)33 pages
Shirky, Clay. “Sharing Anchors Community,” Here Comes Everybody The
Power of Organizing Without Organizations. (CR) 30 pages
Thursday April 20th
Surveillance and war
Vaidhyanathan, Siva. “The Googlization of Us: Universal Surveillance and
Infrastructural Imperialism.” The Googlization of Everything (And Why We Should Worry). (82-98) (CR) 15 pages
Vaidhyanathan, Siva. “The Googlization of Us: Universal Surveillance and
Infrastructural Imperialism.” The Googlization of Everything (And Why We Should Worry). (98-114) (ARS) 14 pages
Community Cinema screening. National Bird. 7 p.m. Pauling 216. (screening mandatory, make up for class)
Tuesday April 25th
Literature and Digital Technology
Hayles, Katherine. “The Future of Literature: Print Novels and the
Mark of the Digital.” Electronic Literature: New Horizons for the
Literary. (CR) 28 pages
Vaidhyanathan, Siva Introd. “The Googlization of Knowledge: The Future of
Books.” The Googlization of Everything And Why We Should Worry. (ARS) 24 pages.
Lo and Behold: Reveries of the Connected World. Dir. Wernerz Herzog, 2016.
Interview to N. Katherine Hayles
Thursday April 27th
Van Dijck, Jose. “From Shoebox to Digital Memory Machine.” Mediated Memories In The Digital Age. (ARS)
Friend, Tad. “Silicon Valley’s Quest to Live Forever.” The New Yorker. 3/27/2017
2045 Strategic Social Initiative http://2045.com/
Screening in class: The Entire History of You. Black Mirror.
Tuesday May 2nd
Knowledge and Memory
Aiden, Erez and J.B. Michel. “Armchair Lexicographerologists,” Uncharted Big
Data as a Lens on Human Culture. (CR). 27 pages
Aiden, Erez and J.B. Michel.“Utopia, Dystopia and Dat(A)topia,”Uncharted Big
Data as a Lens on Human Culture. (ARS) 28 pages
Cultural Observatory, Ngram Viewer: http://www.culturomics.org/home
Thursday May 4th
Abstract of Final project is due (1-2 pages)
Tuesday May 9th
Student Presentations of Final Project
Thursday May 11th
Student Presentations of Final Project
Tuesday May 16th
Study Day
May 17th- 23rd (Final Exams)
Final essay due by midnight (Date to be announced)

Digital Humanities Bibliography 
Aiden, E., & Michel, J. (2013). Uncharted: big data as lens on human culture. New York: Riverhead Books, a member of Penguin Group (USA).
Amichai-Hanburger, Y. (2005). The Social net: understanding human behavior in cyberspace. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
Baudrillard, J. (1994). The illusion of the end. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press.
Baym, N.K. (2010). Personal connections in the digital age. Cambridge, UK: Polity.
Blikstein, P. (1992). Introduction. Travels in Troy with Freire.
Boyd, D. (2014). It’s Complicated: The Social Lives of Network Teens. London: Yale University Press.
Cadwalladr, C. (2016). Google, democracy and the truth about internet search.  The Guardian. Retrieved December 5, 2016, from http://www.theguardian.com/
Ceruzzi, P. E. (2003) A history of modern computing. London, Eng.: MIT Press.
Freire, P. (1973). Society in Transition. Education for Critical Consciousness. New York: Seabury.
Friend, Tad. (2017). “Silicon Valley’s Quest to Live Forever.” The New Yorker.
Morville, Peter. “The Sociosemantic Web.” Ambient Findability.
Galloway, A. R. (2012). The interface effect. Cambridge, UK: Polity.
Garbaudo, P. (2012). Tweets and the streets: social media and contemporary activism. London: Pluto Press.
Golumbia, D. (2014). Death of a Discipline. A Journal of Feminist Cultural Studies, 25(1), 156-176. Duke University Press.
Hayles, K. (2008). The Future of Literature. Electronic Literature: New Horizons for the Library (pp. 159-186). Notre Dame: University of Notre Dame.
Heller, N. (2016). The Failure of Facebook Democracy. The New Yorker. Retrieved November 22,2016.
Herrera, Linda. (2014). Revolution in the Age of Social Media: The Egyptian Popular Insurrection and the Internet. Verso.
Jenkins, H. (2006).  Converge culture: where old and new media collide. New York: New York University Press.
Kaplan, Jerry. (2015). Humans Need Not Apply: A Guide to Wealth and Work in the Age of Artificial Intelligence. Yale University Press.
Liu, A. (2013). The Meaning of the Digital Humanities. The Changing Profession, 128 (10), pp 409-423.
Mande, J. (2016). How I learned to Game Twitter. The New Yorker. Retrieved November 29, 2016.
Manovich, Lev. (2001). “What New Media Is Not.” The Language of New Media. The MIT Press.
Margalit, R. (2016). Should Auschwitz Be a Site for Selfies?. The New Yorker. Retrieved January 9, 2017.
Marwick, A. E. (2013). Status update: celebrity, publicity, and branding in the social media age. New Haven: Yale University Press.
Mone, G. (2016). What’s Next for Digital Humanities. Society, 59(6), 20-21.
Morville, Peter. “The Sociosemantic Web.” Ambient Findability.
Negroponte, N. (1995). Being Digital. New York: Knopf.
Rainie, H., & Wellman, B. (2012). Networked: The New Social Operating System. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.
Segovia, Kathryn and Jeremy N. Bailenson. (2013). ”Identity Manipulation What Happens When Identity Presentation is Not Truthful.” The Social Net: Understanding our online behavior. Ed. Yair Amichai-Hamburger.
Shirky, C. (2018). Here comes everybody: the power of organizing without organizations. New York: Penguin Press.
Thomas, D. (2002) (Not)Hackers: Subculture, Style, and Media Incorporation. Hcker culture (pp. 141-171). Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press.
Vaidhyanathan, S. (2011). The Goolization of everything: (and why we should worry). Berkley: University of California Press.
van Dijck, J. (2007). Mediated Memories as a Conceptual Too Mediated Memories in the Digital Age. Stanford University Press.  

Courses taught at Stanford University

Stanford Postdoctoral Fellow


HUM 38B Roots and Routes: Narrative Geographies of the Americas
Two-quarter sequence. Colonialism, transnationalism, migration and immigration, and gender and language in the Americas through novels and shorter pieces from the Latin American, Chicano/a, and Latino/traditions. (Brotherston, Rosa, Yarbro-Bejarano)


HUM 25A,B. Art and Ideas: Performance and Practice
Two-quarter sequence. Issues in aesthetics and performance through examples from the classical age to the present. Concepts of art and practice intersecting with topics such as imitation, instruction through pleasure, the creative process, perception, social analysis, and embodiment as a form of knowledge. Texts and performances from drama, dance, music, visual arts, and performance art practices that reflect aesthetic ideas. GER:IHUM-2,3 IHUM 25A. 5 units, Win (Rayner) IHUM 25B. 5 units, Spr (Ross)


HUM 46. Visions of Mortality
Anyone reading this is alive, and so will someday die. Issues arising from these facts of life and death beginning with the most fundamental questions arising from the first-person confrontation with thoughts of one’s own mortality. Is death bad for a person, and if so, why? What can the badness or the indifference of death tell us about what makes life good? If death is the permanent end of existence, does this make human choices arbitrary, and life meaningless? GER:IHUM-1 5 units, Aut (Barrett, Bobonich)


HUM 62. Conflict, Cooperation, and Human Nature
Forms of social interaction and their relationship with what makes people human. The focus is on the construction of family systems, warfare, and slavery as uniquely human activities. How people manipulate classifications such as the nonhuman in an effort to define a potential spouse, an opponent in war, or a slave. Sources include anthropology, history, and comparative perspectives. GER:IHUM-1 5 units, Aut (Hilde, Jones)


HUM 8A,9A. Myth and Modernity: Culture in Germany
Two-quarter sequence. The tension between tradition and progress through an examination of German cultural history. The experience of modernity typically involves overcoming or denying the past, but that same past can return to haunt the present in the form of myths. The interplay of myth and modernity, the irrationality of narrative, and the reason of progress, through the example of German culture, especially in literature, from the heroic epics of the medieval era through the catastrophes of the last century. GER:IHUM-2,3 IHUM 8A. 5 units, Win (Berman) IHUM 9A. 5 units, Spr (Eshel, Strum)


Cursos online

Núcleo Educativo Cine Documental
(aún a precios 2012) 


La chica del sur (2012)

Investigación y guión para el desarrollo de documentales
 
8 clases – Workshop – Clínica de guiones – Fragmentos de documentales  – Textos complementarios y entrevistas con los cineastas – Campus virtual con Foro y chat (no requiere la instalación de ningún programa) – Se otorgan certificados

 
Dictado por: Tomás Crowder-Taraborrelli y Javier Campo
Cierre de inscripción: 14 de marzo de 2014.
Comienzo: 17 de marzo de 2014.
Informes e inscripción: 

cursos@cinedocumental.com.ar
 
 

Historia del cine documental argentino
(Actualizado 2014)

En 8 clases durante 2 meses.
Cierre de inscripción: 14 de marzo de 2014.
Comienzo: 17 de marzo de 2014.
Se entregan certificados.

Tandil Curso 2013

Universidad Nacional del Centro de la Provincia de Buenos Aires

Facultad de Arte

Seminario de posgrado 

CINE, CRÍMENES DE LESA HUMANIDAD Y GENOCIDIO: Estrategias de documentación y representación

 Prof. Tomás Crowder-Taraborrelli*


Días y horarios: Miércoles 10, Jueves 11 y Viernes 12 de julio de 9 a 13 hs. y 15 a 19 hs.

Lugar: Sede de la Facultad de Arte (9 de julio 430, Tandil)

Se adjunta Programa.

*Tomás Crowder-Taraborrelli: Profesor de la Universidad Soka, California. Productor asociado de ITVS, la televisión pública norteamericana. Co-editor de la sección de cine de la revista Latin American Perspectives.

SEMINARIO NO ARANCELADO. CUPOS LIMITADOS. Inscripción previa: investigacion@arte.unicen.edu.ar

Organiza: Departamento de Historia y Teoría del Arte- Facultad de Arte UNICEN

Más información: Secretaría de Investigación y Posgrado, 9 de julio 430, Planta Alta, Tel (0054) – 249 – 440631 int. 210

investigacion@arte.unicen.edu.ar
http://www.arte.unicen.edu.ar

Con los estudiantes del seminario de posgrado

Film Policy under MERCOSUR: The Case of Uruguay


Film Policy under MERCOSUR: The Case of Uruguay

Tamara L. Falicov

Abstract: This paper explores the cultural dimensions of regional integration that could result from the regional trade pact of the Latin American Southern Cone called MERCOSUR. The aim of this study is to understand whether cultural industries such as film can be aided by state policies that work to erase borders between neighbouring countries and to facilitate interchange and trade through regional integration. Despite grassroots mobilization by filmmakers, this cultural dimension of MERCOSUR has not been realized in any material fashion. This research explores the various reasons for the failure of this policy. The Uruguayan film industry serves as a case study of some of the obstacles to cultural integration.

Introduction

This study explores the ways in which cultural industries such as film are affected by state policies in the Latin American Southern Cone. The essential purpose of these policies, implemented under the regional trade pact MERCOSUR, is to erase borders between neighbouring countries and to facilitate interchange and trade through regional integration. By promoting a network of cross-border film co-operation, this effort could potentially contest (or, in an ideal world, circumvent) Hollywood’s dominance in the areas of film production, exhibition, and distribution. Despite grassroots mobilization by filmmakers of the member countries (Argentina, Brazil, Paraguay, and Uruguay), however, this cultural dimension of MERCOSUR has not been realized in terms of any definitive, active institutionalized co-production initiatives. This paper examines the various reasons for the failure of this policy. Uruguay and its audiovisual industry demonstrate why the implementation of regional audiovisual policies has not worked under the regional trade agreement MERCOSUR. My research suggests that film production in Uruguay has been aided more on both local and pan-Ibero-American levels than on a regional level.

To read the rest of the article, please click on the following link:

Latin American Film Industry May Receive Boost in the Global Recession

Latin American Film Industry May Receive Boost in the Global Recession

FEBRUARY 13, 2009by Danielle Renwick

In the last few months conventional wisdom has said that all bets are off when it comes to investments. While most sectors of the economy are starving for cash and credit, Latin American film makers are hoping to attract foreign investors looking to lower costs by investing in non-U.S. projects.

Andres Calderón, executive producer at Dynamo capital, was in New York last week to test that hypothesis. Calderón, who worked as an investment banker for eight years before joining the Colombian production firm Dynamo, is hoping that the credit crunch affecting Hollywood will provide new opportunities for Latin American movie makers.
To see the rest of the article click the following link:


Latin pic marts sizzle:Markets flourish, boosted by buying spree

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Latin pic marts sizzle:
Markets flourish, boosted by buying spree

Sat., Apr. 9, 2011 By JOHN HOPEWELL, JAMES YOUNG

GUADALAJARA, Mexico — One decade ago, most Latin American national film industries were struggling for survival.

Now, after production levels have boomed in most territories — Argentina alone made 154 features last year — they’re battling for the keys to further growth.

A dynamic clutch of dedicated national, mini-regional and pan-Latin American film markets are aimed at boosting exports and co-productions for young, but fast-maturing local production sectors.

Mexico’s Guadalajara mart, under 2006-10 director Jorge Sanchez, built up its Film Market and Ibero-American Co-production Meeting, and imported Cannes’ Producers Network and a Guadalajara Construye rough-cut section.

This week’s Buenos Aires’ Bafici Festival boasts a prestigious works-in-progress section, a BAL co-production forum and Puentes, a Europe-Latin America meet.

Buenos Aires’ Ventana Sur, a custom-built mart for Latin American pics combining the strength of its organizers, Cannes’ Film Market and Argentina’s Incaa film institute, has taken Latin American film markets to the next level.

At least 300 buyers and 1,960 non-Latin American participants attended the second edition of Ventana Sur in December.

To read the rest of the article, click on the following link:

From “Third Cinema” to “Latin American film” Written by Samantha Holland


From “Third Cinema” to “Latin American film”


Written by Samantha Holland , May 16

Globalisation, national identity and the demise of political filmmaking

This article stems from concerns I have about the label “Latin American film,” or “Latin American cinema,” because the films to which it refers are so diverse, but the label homogenises them – and, by extension, the cultures from which they emerge. My concern is not primarily about the use of the term by people interested in film and culture – such as community members on this site! – but by the global film industry and by cultural theorists (where the former have vested interests in the label, and the latter should know better). In presenting some of these concerns, I describe changes that have lead to the widespread use and acceptance of this label, as well as aspects of the history of films and filmmaking in Latin American countries that makes such a label problematic for me and more generally.


Some recent developments in “Latin American cinema”

It’s no exaggeration to claim that what we currently call “globalisation” has since the 1990s changed the production and distribution of films from several Latin American countries almost beyond recognition and, as a result, changed the very perception of what is now generally termed “Latin American cinema” or “Latin American film.” And terminology is crucial here – both to the issues I discuss, and to the concerns I raise. Especially significant is that while many of the countries I’m discussing were until recently called “developing countries,” they’re now termed “emerging markets” – something that’s happened as free-trade ideas and practices spread across the subcontinent and its governments lessen their involvement in filmmaking. The term “emerging markets” immediately shifts the identities at issue from national to commercial ones – something perhaps especially significant in the context of Latin American countries, for which the expression of national identities has been so important and so central to filmmaking, and for which commercial success was until comparatively recently neither a crucial aim nor a particular indicator of success.

To read the rest of the article please click on the following link: