Latin American Literature

Tomás F. Crowder-Taraborrelli
Office, office hours: Maathai 414, Mondays and Fridays 3:00- 4:00 p.m.
Class Website 
LATIN AMERICAN LITERATURE
This course is a survey of twentieth-century Latin American literature. The fact that many of these readings are grouped under this category reveals that we have a need to organize knowledge in a way that is industrious and geopolitically convenient. Although it is undeniable that some of the authors featured in this course have found inspiration in each other’s writings and shared long conversations about national identity, cultural heritage, social reform and liberation, most of them carried on with their work in blissful remoteness.
To begin the study of Latin American literature is to enter a universe of literary innovation, cultural critique, philosophical ruminations, jealously, and the often eluding quest to establish a continental movement to amend the painful legacies of colonialism, racism and underdevelopment. Jorge Volpi, one of the writers included in the reading list for the course, recently wrote:
What do we, Latin Americans, share in exclusivity? More of the same: a language, catholic traditions, Roman law, a few customs of an uncertain indigenous or African origin, and the resentment, now turned into jokes, against Spain and the United States? Is that all? After two centuries of independence, is that all? Seriously?
The literary works I’ve selected for this course make great demands both on readers and scholars. They demand open-mindedness, passionate reflection and the luxury to continue exploring the historical allusions made in these narratives after the course is over. In the last decades, an analytical dialogue has deepened the study of literary texts with writings from multiple disciplines: sociology, psychology, history, philosophy, and art history just to name a few. Academics often refer to these often-interdisciplinary texts as “theory”. I have included several influential “theoretical” texts in our reading list in an attempt to show you the pleasures and pains of “applying” what could appear to be “esoteric” formulations to the interpretation of literature.
A main motivation in this course is to attempt to answer Volpi’s open-ended question (quoted above). I hope that during our classroom discussions will be the beginning of an educated response to his insolent query.
REQUIRED BOOKS
I recommend you purchase your books on Powell’s books website http://www.powells.com right after you read this syllabus! Please purchase the same editions I have listed. Keep in mind that you must attend class with your personal copy of the books not a digital version in your computer (when possible). If readings are posted on Brightspace, please bring a hard copy to class.
     
Aira, Cesar. How I Became a Nun. New York: New Directions, 2007 (optional).
Arlt, Roberto. Mad Toy. Transl. McKay Aynesworth. Durham: Duke University Press, 2002 [electronic version
available from Ikeda Library].
Bellatín, Mario. Beauty Salon. San Francisco: City Lights Books, 2009 (required text).
Bolaño, Roberto. Distant Star. New York: New Directions, 2004 (required text).
Carpentier, Alejo. The Kingdom of This World. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2006 (required text).
Lemebel, Pedro. My Tender Matador: A Novel. New York: Groove Press, 2004 (required text).
Lispector, Clarice. The Hour of the Star. New York: New Directions Books, 1992 (Sixth       Printing) (required text).
Pacheco, Jose Emilio. Battles in the Desert & Other Stories. New York: New Directions, 1987 (required text).
Schwelbin, Samantha. Birds In The Mouth. Electric Literature, 2012 (kindle edition on Amazon, optional)
Zamba, Alejandro. Bonsai. First Melville House Printing: October, 2008 (required text).
LEARNING OBJECTIVES
• To understand some of the key literary figures and movements in Latin American literature
• Learn to read closely short-stories, poems, novels and literary criticism essays
• Gain knowledge about historical events that shaped the continent’s literary movements and the life of some of their key authors
• Analyze a literary text through the lens of philosophical or critical theory essays
• Write short academic essays about literature
COURSE REQUIREMENTS
• Journals (25%)
The purpose of the journals is to help generate ideas and to give the students an informal arena in which to state reactions to the works they read, to record initial explications of key passages, and most importantly, to help students think about the work in relation to other works discussed in the course. I will check the journals periodically.
• 2 Papers (25%)
Two 5-6-page essays with research (secondary sources) focusing on a poem, essay or work of fiction we have discussed in class.
• Class presentation (30%)
Presentations should cover literary criticism, or an article regarding an author, his or her work, or a particular aspect of the development of Latin American literature in the twentieth century- 10 minutes in length
• Class participation and attendance (20%)
• Unannounced quizzes may be given to insure the class is reading the assigned material 
WEEK 1:  February 9th and 11th
 Introduction to Latin American Literature and Literary Criticism
Tuesday: Introduction to the Course. Williams, Raymond. Marxism and Literature, “Culture”, “Literature”, “Creative Practice” (Brightspace).
Wednesday: Carlos Velázquez, La marrana negra de la literatura rosa. Translated by Jake Edelstein (Soka alumni).
WEEK 2: February 16th and 18th
Latin American surrealism and historicism
Tuesday: Miguel Angel Asturias, Legends of Guatemala. “Legend of La Tatuana” (on Brightspace).
Thursday: (cont.) Roberto Fernández Retamar, Calibán and Other Essays, “Calibán: Notes Toward a Discussion of Culture in Our America” (on Brightspace)
WEEK 3: February 23rd and 25th
Modernism
Tuesday: Roberto Arlt: Mad Toy, translated by Michelle Aynesworth (electronic copy available through the library) 1-85.
Thursday: Roberto Arlt: Mad Toy, translated by Michelle Aynesworth (electronic copy available through the library) 85-170.
WEEK 4: March 1st and 3rd
A Caribbean master
Tuesday: Alejo Carpentier. The Kingdom of This World. Part One (1-90)
Thursday: Alejo Carpentier. The Kingdom of This World. Part Two (91-180) .Terry Eagleton, “Political Criticism” (on Brightspace)
WEEK 5: March 8th and 10th
A paper revolution- the literary avant-garde
Tuesday: Jorge Luis Borges. Selected short stories (on Brightspace)
Thursday: Jorge Luis Borges. Selected short stories (cont.). Michelle Foucault. The Order of Things, “Preface” “Las Meninas” (on Brightspace)
WEEK 6: March 16th and 18th
SPRING BREAK!!
WEEK 7: March 22nd and 24th
Magical realism and the boom
Tuesday: Gabriel García Márquez, Strange Pilgrims, “Prologue”, “The Saint”, “Miss Forbe’s Summer of Happiness” (on Brightspace)
Thursday: Pablo Neruda, The Poetry of Pablo Neruda, “The Heights of Macchu Picchu” “America, I do not invoke your name in vain” “Canto General of Chile” (on Brightspace)
WEEK 8: March 29th and 31st
The fantastic
Tuesday: Todorov, The Fantastic, “Definition of the fantastic”, “The uncanny and the marvelous” (excerpt on Brightspace) Julio Cortázar, Selected short stories (on Brightspace): “House taken over,” “The distances,” “The Idol of the Cyclades” “Blow-up,” “Letter to a young girl in Paris.”
Thursday: Julio Cortázar, Selected short stories (on Brightspace).
WEEK 9: April 5th and 7th
Gender and sexuality
FIRST PAPER DUE ON THIS TUESDAY! (5 pages) Bring hard copy to class!
Tuesday: Rosario Ferré, The Youngest Doll, “The Youngest Doll” (on Brightspace).
Thursday: Clarice Lispector. The Hour of the Star.
FILM ON RESERVE TO BE VIEWED OVER THE WEEKEND: The Hour of the Star
WEEK 10: April 12th and 14th
Violence and sex
Tuesday: Alejandro Zambra, Bonsai. Reading marathon [location to be announced].
Thursday: Samantha Schwelbin. Birds in the Mouth (selection, kindle). Theodor W. Adorno, Prisms, “Cultural Criticsim and Society” (on Brightspace)
WEEK 11: April 19th and 21st
Love and death
Tuesday: Mario Bellatín. Beauty Salon.
Gaston Bachelard, The Poetics of Space, “The house, from cellar to garret. The significance of the hut” (on Brightspace)
Thursday:  Rodrigo Ray Rosa, Dust on her tongue, “Dust on her tongue”, “Privacy”, “The Burial” (on Brightspace)
Jorge Volpi, “Ars Poetica”, Mayra Montero “That man, Pollack” (on Brightspace)
WEEK 12: April 26th and 28th
Bolaño and literary, deadly, social clubs
Tuesday: Roberto Bolaño. Distant Star, part One.
Thursday: Roberto Bolaño, Distant Star, part Two.
WEEK 13: May 3rd and 5th
Short-stories
Tuesday: Pedro Lemebel. My Tender Matador. Part One
Thursday: Pedro Lemebel. My Tender Matador. Part Two.
WEEK 14: May 10th and 12th
Oral presentations if needed
SECOND PAPER IS DUE (6 pages, date to be announced!)

WEEK 15: FINALS WEEK! May 18th to May 24th

Bibliography 

Adorno, Theodor W. “Cultural Criticism and Society.” Prisms. MIT Press, 1981.

Asturias, Miguel Angel., and R. Kelly. Washbourne. “Legend of La Tatuana.” Legends of Guatemala = Leyendas de Guatemala. Latin American Literary Review Press, 2011.

Bachelard, Gaston, and M. Jolas. The poetics of space. Penguin Books, 2014.

Bellatin, Mario. Beauty Salon. City Lights Publisher, 2009.

Bolaño, Roberto. Distant star. Vintage, 2009.

Borges, Jorge Luis, and Pierre Macherey. Jorge Luis Borges. Freeland, 1978.

Carpentier, Alejo. The kingdom of this world. Macmillan, 2006. 1-180.

Lispector, Clarice. The Hour of the Star. New Directions, 1992.

Cortázar, Julio, and Paul Blackburn. Blow-up, and other stories. Pantheon Books, 2013.

Ferre, Rosario. The Youngest Doll. University of Nebraska Press, 1991.

Lemebel, Pedro. My tender matador. Grove Press, 2003.

Marquez, Gabriel Garcia. Strange Pilgrims. Vintage, 2006.

Neruda, Pablo, and Ilan Stavans. The poetry of Pablo Neruda. Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2005.

Retamar, Roberto Fernández. Caliban and other essays. University of Minnesota Press, 2005. 1-170.

Rosa, Rodrigo Rey. Dust on her tongue. City Lights Books, 1992.

Schweblin, By: Samanta. “Birds in the Mouth.” PEN America, 18 Nov. 2011, pen.org/birds-in-the-mouth/.

Todorov, Tzvetan, and Richard Howard. The fantastic: a structural approach to a literary genre. Cornell Univ. Pr., 2007

Velázquez, Carlos. La marrana negra de la literatura rosa. Sexto Piso, 2013.

Williams, Raymond. Marxism and literature. Oxford University Press, 2009.

Zambra, Alejandro. Bonsai. Melville House, 2012.

Modes of Inquiry

SUA
T.C-T
Fall 2017
INQUIRY 100-03 (8055)
Office: Maathai 414. Office hours by appointment
Course meets Tuesdays and Thursdays 1:00 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. Gandhi 303B
Class Website
MODES Inquiry online

 
We must compel the “frozen circumstances to dance by singing to them their own melody”
Karl Marx, “Toward the Critique of Hegel’s Philosophy of Law”

This course examines the various ways of studying, knowing, and understanding information and experience.  Specifically, we will examine how knowledge is developed in different areas of study. 
Modes of Inquiry focuses on the AXIOMATIC (or formal deductive), PHILOSOPHICAL, HISTORICAL, OBSERVATIONAL (or empirical), IMAGINATIVE EXPRESSIVE, and INTERPRETIVE paradigms of discovery and understanding.  All parts of this course use modes of inquiry to explore selected topics and issues.
This course will help students approach the rest of the curriculum with a critical sense of the varying ways that knowledge and understanding are conceived and used by different disciplines.  When investigating problems and articulating insights, students will be able to choose among and combine different modes of inquiry.  Students will be able to understand the assumptions and limitations that underlie the various ways of inquiring used within disciplines, see that certain problems require using certain modes of inquiry, see that intellectual problems often require the use of many modes of inquiry, seeing the delineation and commonalities among the various modes of inquiry.
Course Objectives
Inquiry is the process of exploring questions.  Inquiry does not necessarily imply the finding of answers to those questions.  As we will discover, absolute answers, fact, or truth is elusive.  During the past two or three thousand years, humanity has developed a variety of different approaches to inquiry.  Some approaches are more suited to certain questions; some approaches are more suited to different questions.  These approaches have persisted and developed because they have been successful (to a greater or lesser extent) in fostering discovery and communication.  A person of broad education and intellectual breadth is distinguished by their ability to understand and use many different modes.
In this course, we will explore some important questions that humans have always asked. We will study SIX important modes or methods by which they have explored these questions.
1.    Axiomatic Inquiry:
This involves the method of argumentation, using inductive and deductive reasoning, logic, step by step reasoning and critical thinking. What counts as a good argument?  What is the format of an argument?
2.    Philosophic Inquiry:
This involves thinking about deep theoretical questions such as, What is reality? What is good? What is knowledge? What is reason? What are ethics?
3.    Observational/Scientific Inquiry:
This section deals with a presentation of some scientific paradigms and some critiques of science in general.  How do we come to understand the empirical world?  What is the substance of reality? What is the mechanism behind events? What can we observe? What can we measure?  Is objectivity possible?  What has been left out of the sciences?
4.    Historical Inquiry:
This section covers how we can look at history.  What happened in the past? How do we create the past?  What does the past have to do with how we view the world now?
5.    Interpretive/Social Scientific: 
This inquiry focuses on how it is that we view the world and “interpret” our experiences based on our perspectives in the social world.
6.    Imaginative Expressive:
This inquiry involves aesthetic contemplation of things such as art, beauty, and creativity, as well as new and contemporary paradigms for imagining the world.  Additionally, we will discuss what constitutes meaningfulness, and how to know what it looks like when it happens.
At the end of the course, you should have an understanding of the scope of human questioning, and the various ways in which people have tried to find answers to these questions.
LEARNING OUTCOMES
1.  To understand the assumptions that underlie the various modes of inquiry used within and across disciplines
2.  To understand that every mode of inquiry has its own strengths and limitations in the exploration of a given question or problem
3.  To be able to sustain a line of argument using one or more modes of inquiry
4.  To be able to articulate the commonalities and/or differences among various modes of inquiry
STUDENT  WORK
   Complete common readings and any additional readings assigned specifically to you. Take notes.  Come to class prepared to raise challenging questions about the readings. Question the interpretative authority of the authors and also of your classmates and professor.
   Attendance to films screening and participation after.
    Daily class reflections: You must buy a pack of flashcards and bring them with you to every class. At the end of each class period, I will give you 10 minutes to reflect on the reading/s and discussion. On your flashcards, please write down a few notes on the topic of discussion and/or transcribe one or two quotes from the readings (make sure you include first and last name of the author, title of the essay or book, and page number).
   Create and maintain a blog. On your blog, you will write comments about the readings, class discussions, screenings, small assignments or other pertinent materials. You will also be asked to compose a creative piece (short film, music composition, etc.). The blog should be a creative space to share your ideas with others. Feel free to upload videos, music, photographs and links.
   3 Short Papers
   Abstract and outline of your final presentation
   Final presentation of blog: Blogs should be formatted in such a way that allows for a presentation in the classroom or small auditorium. Prepare an annotated bibliography of 10 sources.Students must have at least one source from each mode of inquiry
   Final Paper
ABBREVIATIONS
CR    Common Readings- Every student needs to do the reading and prepare for
class discussion
ARS   Assigned Reading to 1 student: The student who is assigned the reading
must prepare a 10-minute presentation on the reading and prepare to
engage with other readings or films scheduled for that day.
BOOKS YOU NEED TO BUY
Shelley, M. 2003. Frankenstein.  London: Penguin Classics.
Butler, O. 1979. Kindred. Boston: Beacon Press.
SCHEDULE OF READINGS and ASSIGNMENTS
1st WEEK
Thursday, Sept. 7th
Levitin, Daniel J. The Organized Mind: Thinking Straight in the Age of Information Overload: “Organizing our homes: Where Things Can Start to Get Better.” (CR) 36 pgs
Harvey, David. “On Contradiction” “The Moving Contradictions: Technology, Work and Human Disposability”.  Seventeen contradictions and the end of Capitalism. (CR) 11 pgs.
Watts, Alan W. The Joyous Cosmology: Adventures in the Chemistry of Consciousness [selection, copy provided in class]. (AR) 3 pgs.
2nd Week
Tuesday, Sept. 12th
Freire, Paulo. “Society in Transition”. Education For Critical Consciousness.  (AR)
McAllister, Matthew. “Consumer culture and new media: commodity fetishism in the digital era”. Media Perspectives for the 21st Century. (CR)
FILM: Joe’s Violin by Kahane Cooperman https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8D5h_Y8N4tg 24 min.
Assignment: Create your blog and write your first entry by Sunday!
Thursday, Sept. 14th
Slouka, Mark. “Listening for Silence: Notes on the Aural Life”.  Audio Culture: Readings in Modern Music. (AR)
Hegel, G.W.F. The Phenomenology of the Spirit. “Self-consciousness: The Truth of Self Certainty” and “Freedom of Self-Consciousness: Stoicism, Scepticism, And The Unhappy Consciousness” [selection]. (CR)
Ollman, Bertell. “Putting Dialectics to Work: The Process of Abstraction in Marx’s Method” (selection) (AR)
Deep Listening exercise [in class]
Opening Art Show Soka University Gallery: Artists Sebastián Chillemi and Pablo Salvadó.  Sleeping in the Forest. Dreamscapes of nature and society. Reception: 5:30- 7:30 p.m.
3rd Week
Tuesday, Sept. 19th
Marx. “Economic and Philosophic Manuscripts of 1844”. The Marx-Engels Reader. [selections]. (CR)
Stockfelt, Ola. “Adequate Modes of Listening”. Audio Culture: Readings in Modern Music. (AR)
How Does a Turntable Work?
Assignment:  Second entry in your blog is due by Sunday!
Thursday, Sept. 21st
Brecht, Bertolt. Galileo. (CR) Scene 1 to 8.
Brecht, Bertolt. “The Epic Theater and Its Difficulties”. Brecht on Theatre: The Development of an Aesthetic. (AR)
Galilei, Galileo. Octavo: Sidereus Nuncius. (AR)
4th Week
Tuesday, Sept. 26th
Brecht, Bertolt. Galileo. (CR) Scene 9 to 13.
Manovich, Lev. “Principles of New Media.” The Language of New Media. (CR) 22 pages.
Thursday, Sept. 28th
Vertov, Dziga. “The Council of Three”, “The Birth of Kino-Eye”, “The Essence of Kino-Eye”, “On the Organization of a Creative Laboratory”, “The Man with A Movie Camera.” [CR]
FILM: Vertov, The Man with the Movie Camera [selection]
Deep Listening Exercise [in class]
SUA Community Cinema:  Presents Last Men in Aleppo, by Feras Fayyad. Pauling 216 7 p.m.
Assignment: Third blog entry- report on “Deep Listening Exercise” is due by Sunday!
5th WEEK
Tuesday, October 3rd
Shelley, Mary. Frankenstein [first half of the novel] (CR)
Thursday, October 5th
Shelley, Mary. Frankenstein [second half of the novel] (CR)
Halberstam, Judith. 1995. “Making Monsters: Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein”. Skin Shows: Gothic Horror and the Technology of Monsters. (AR)
6th WEEK
Tuesday, October 10th
Huxley, Aldous. The Doors of Perception (CR)
Reich, Steve. It’s Gonna Rain. [recording]
Hugh Le Caine “Dripsody” [recording]
Stockhausen “Gesang Der Junglinge” [Song of the Youths] [recording]
The Beatles “Tomorrow Never Knows” (1966) [recording]
Thursday, October 12th
Huxley, Aldous. The Doors of Perception (CR)
FILM: Magic Trip (2011) [film selection screened in class]
Eisler, Hanns and Theodor Adorno. “The Politics of Hearing”. Audio Culture: Readings in Modern Music. (AR)
Assignment:  Fourth blog entry is due on Sunday!
7th WEEK
Tuesday, October 17th
Dery, Mark. Flame Wars: The Discourse of Cyberculture: “Black to the Future: Interviews with Samuel R. Delany, Greg Tate and Tricia Rose.” (AR)
RECORDING: Sun Ra and His Arkestra, Jazz In Silhouette.
Thursday, October 19th
FILM: The Last Angel of History by John Akomfrah (45 minutes)
SUA Community Cinema: Presents Shalom Italia by Tamar Tal Anati  Community Cinema, 7
p.m. Puling 216
Assignment: FIRST SHORT ESSAY is due on Brightspace by midnight on Sunday!!!
8th WEEK
Tuesday, October 24th
Bilger, Burkhard. “The Possibilian”. The New Yorker. 4/25/2011 (CR)
FILM: The Brain with David Eagleman: What is reality? BBC. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3MSw2irv0-A
Malabou, Catherine. What Should We Do with Our Brain?: “The Central Power in Crisis.” (AR) 23 pgs.
Thursday, October 26th
FILM: The Last Angel of History, dir. John Akomfrah (1996) 45 min.
RECORDING: A Love Supreme by John Coltrane
Assignment: Fifth blog entry is due on Sunday! Brief description of your final project.
9th WEEK
Tuesday, October 31st
Fanon, Frantz. “The Fact of Blackness”. Black Skin, White Masks. (CR)
Assignment: SECOND SHORT essay is due!
     
Thursday, November 2nd
Fanon, Frantz. “The Fact of Blackness”. Black Skin, White Masks. (CR) (discussion continues)
Class discussion of final projects!
Community Cinema Presents: Chasing Trane: The John Coltrane Documentary by John Scheinfeld. Pauling 216 7 p.m.
10th WEEK
Tuesday, November 7th
Cage, John. “The Future of Music: Credo”. Audio Culture: Readings in Modern Music. “Silence.  (CR)
Oliveros, Pauline. “Some Sound Observations”. Audio Culture: Readings in Modern Music. (AR)
RECORDINGS: Carlos, Wendy. Switched on Bach (1968), Sonic Seasonings (1972)
Thursday, November 9th
Szwed, John F. Space is The Place: The Lives and Times of Sun Ra. (CR)
VIDEO: Sun Ra Night Music (1989)
FILM: Sun Ra: A Joyful Noise, by Robert Mugge
Assignment: Albums
11th WEEK
Tuesday, November 14th
Presentation: Albums
Thursday, November 16th
Cage, John. “Lecture on Nothing”.
RECORDINGS: Riley, Terry. In C [recording]
12th WEEK
Tuesday, November 21st
Butler, Octavia E. Kindred First half of the novel (CR)
Thursday, November 23rd
THANKSGIVING!!!
Continue reading Kindred.
13th WEEK
Tuesday, November 28th
Butler, Octavia E. Kindred (CR) Discussion of the novel
Thursday, November 30th
      Discussion final projects
14th WEEK
Tuesday, December 5th
Winter, Alison. Memory: Fragments of a Modern History.
RECORDINGS: Feldman, Morton. Rothko Chapel.
Reynols & Pauline Oliveros. Pauline Oliveros in the Arms of Reynols
SUA Community Cinema Presents: I’m Not Your Negro by Raoul Peck, Pauling 216, 7 p.m.
Thursday, December 7th
Assignment: Sixth blog entry is due by Sunday!!
15th WEEK
STUDY DAY

PRIMARY and secondary READINGS, also FILMS,RECORDINGS, and LINKS


Bauman, Zygmunt. 2003. Liquid Love: On the Frailty of Human Bond. New York: Polity.

Bilger, Burkhard.  2011. “The Possibilian.” The New Yorker.
http://www.newyorker.com/reporting/2011/04/25/110425fa_fact_bilger?currentPage=all

Brecht, Bertolt. 1966. Galileo. New York: Grove Press.

Cage, John. 2004. “The Future of Music: Credo.” Audio Culture: Readings in Modern Music. London: Continuum.

1961. “2 Pages, 122 Words on Music and Dance.” Silence: Lecture and Writings By John Cage.

Middeltown: Wesleyan University Press. 1961. “Lecture on Nothing”. Silence: Lecture and Writings By John Cage. Middletown: Wesleyan University Press.

Carlos, Wendy.1968. Switched on Bach. [recording]

Chanan, Michael. 1995. Repeated Takes: A Short History of Recording and Its Effects on Music. London: Verso.

Chaplin, Charles. 1936. Modern Times. [film]

Charters, Ann. Ed. 2003. The Portable Sixties Reader. New York: Penguin Compass.

Cox, Christoph and Daniel Warner. Ed.2004. Audio Culture: Readings in Modern Music. London: Continuum.

Eisler, Hanns and Theodor Adorno. 2004. “The Politics of Hearing.” Audio Culture: Readings in Modern Music. London: Continuum.

Ellwood, Alison and Alex Giney. 2011. Magic Trip [film]

Fanon, Frantz. 1994. Black Skin, White Masks. New York: Grove Weidenfeld.

Feldman, Morton. 1991. Rothko Chapel. UC Berkeley Chamber Chorus [recording]

Fjellestad, Hans. 2004. Moog [film]

France, David.2012. How to survive a Plague [film]

Freire, Paulo.1974. “Society in Transition”. Education for Critical Consciousness. London: Bloomsbury.

Frenkel, Nestor.2004. Buscando a Reynol. [film]

Guzman, Patricio. Nostalgia de la Luz [film]

Halberstam, Judith. 1995. Skin Shows: Gothic Horror and the Technology of Monsters. “Making Monsters: Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein.” Durham and London: Duke University Press.

Harding, Sandra.2008. Sciences from Below: Feminisms, Postcolonialities, and Modernities. “The Incomplete first Modernity of Industrial Society”. Durham and London: Duke University Press.

Harvey, David. 2014. Seventeen contradictions and the end of Capitalism. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

2005. A Brief History of Neoliberalism. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Hegel, G. W. F. 1977. Phenomenology of the Spirit. Translated by A.V. Miller. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Hendy, David.2013. Noise: A Human History of Sound and Listening. New York: Harper and Collins.

Huxley, Aldous.1954. The Doors of Perception. New York: Harper & Row, Publishers.

Jelin, Elizabeth.“The Minefields of Memory”.

Leary, Timothy. 2003. “Turning on the World.” The Portable Sixties Reader. New York: Penguin Compass.

Marker, Chris. La Jetée [film]

Marx, Karl.1978. The Marx-Engels Reader. New York: W.W. Norton & Company.

Nancy, Jean Luc.2007. Listening. New York: Fordham University Press.

Oliveros, Pauline.2005. Deep Listening: A Composer’s Sound Practice. Lincoln: iUniverse.

Ollman, Bertell.2003. Dance of the Dialectic: Step in Marx’s Method. Urbana: University of Chicago Press.

Reich, Steve. 1965. It’s Gonna Rain [recording]

Reynols & Pauline Oliveros.

2000. Pauline Oliveros in the Arms of Reynols [recording]

Riley, Terry.2009. In C [recording]

Ross, Alex. 2007. The Rest is Noise. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux.

Singer, Peter. 1983. Hegel: A Very Short Introduction. London: Oxford University Press.

Shelley, Mary. 2003. Frankenstein. London: Penguin Classics.

Sterne, Jonathan. 2003. The Audible Past: Cultural Origins of Sound Reproduction. Durham and London: Duke University Press.

Wolf, Tom. 1968. The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test. New York: Farrar, Straus & Giroux.

Core I

Tomás F. Crowder-Taraborrelli
Meeting times: M-F 1:00-4:00 p.m.
Office hours: M 4-5 p.m., Maathai 414


Core
“The Enduring Questions of Humanity”
2017

Introduction to Core Curriculum

A two-course sequence, Core explores a range of issues related to the mission statement of the university, including its commitment to values such as peace, human rights, and the creative coexistence of nature and humanity. Core also provides an introduction to the various ways of knowing that characterize the major divisions of the undergraduate curriculum, thereby laying the foundation for the interdisciplinary and cross-cultural study that underlies Soka education. In this exploration, Core courses stress an understanding of the social and historical contexts necessary to make meaningful comparisons among cultural traditions.

Upon completing the Core, student-learning outcomes are:


* To demonstrate knowledge of the commonalities and differences of the human experience from multiple (historical/cultural/disciplinary) perspectives
* To critically evaluate this knowledge in relation to their own lives
* To develop their ability to speak and write effectively about their evaluation of this knowledge

Building on a set of common readings, individual members of the faculty help shape the core through reading selections drawn from their special training, expertise, and interests.

Books you need to purchase in the SUA bookstore

Bhagavad-Gita:  The Song of God
Confucius, The Analects
Lao Tzu, Tao Te Ching
Lucretius, On the Nature of Things
The Upanishads:  Breath of the Eternal  [in the bookstore]

Grading

CORE 1 is a Pass/No-Pass class, but you may obtain a letter-grade by formally requesting it by the end of the 2nd day of class. Narrative Assessments will also be given along with your final grade.

Assignments

1st essay, 4 pages      25%
2nd essay, 4 pages      25%
3rd essay, 6 pages      35%
Short oral presentation 15%

Special Needs

Soka University is firmly committed to providing whatever assistance necessary to aid in the learning process.  Those students with special needs are strongly urged to present the appropriate documentation to the Instructor immediately so that the instructor can make the necessary arrangements.

WEEK 1

Monday, August 14
Introduction to the course/syllabus.
Introduction to Lao-Tzu, Tao Te Ching. First 41 sections.
E. Cioran. “Thinking against oneself.” The temptation to
exist. Richard Howard-Susan Sontag-Eugene Thacker. Arcade Pub. 2012 (15 pages).
Discussion of upcoming Essay #1 (DUE on Sunday, Aug. 23rd)
HOMEWORK: Next 40 sections of Lao-Tzu, Tao Te Ching.

Tuesday, August 15
Discussion of Lao-tzu (finish)
Screening of sequence of Rivers and Tides
Introduction to Confucius

HOMEWORK: Confucius Analects, Ch. 1-4, 7, 9, 12-13


Wednesday, August 16
Discussion of Confucius Analects
Screening of sequence of Akira Kurosawa’s Dreams


HOMEWORK: The Upanishads:  Breath of the Eternal [Katha (pp. 13-25), Isha (pp. 26-28)]

Thursday, August 17
Discussion of The Upanishads.

HOMEWORK: Bhagavad-Gita:  The Song of God [Chapters I, II, III (pp. 30-49)]

Friday, August 18
Discussion of Bhagavad-Gita:  The Song of God [Chapters I, II, III (pp. 30-49)]

HOMEWORK: Aristotle’s “Metaphysics.” J. Ackrill. A New Aristotle Reader. Princeton University Press, 1988.

Sunday, August 20
ASSIGNMENT DUE: Essay #1 Due at noon.  


WEEK 2
Monday, August 21
Discussion of Aristotle’s “Metaphysics ” (from Book I (A) to Book
VIII (H)) and upcoming Essay #2.
Weiss, F. G. Hegel’s Critique of Aristotle’s Philosophy of
Mind. Martinus Nijhoff, 1969. (recommended reading)

HOMEWORK: Finish reading Aristotle’s “Metaphysics.”


Tuesday, August 22
Discussion of Aristotle’s “Metaphysics.”
Introduction to Antigone and Greek Tragedy.
FILM: La stanza del figlio (The Son’s Room), Nanni Moretti, 2002.
           
HOMEWORK:

Wednesday, August 23
Discussion Antigone.


HOMEWORK: Antigone


Thursday, August 24
Discussion Antigone
Epicurus. “Letter to Herodotus.” The Art of Happiness.
Trans. George K. Strodach. Penguin Books, 2012.

HOMEWORK: Epicurus. “Letter to Herodotus” and Lucretius Books I, II


Friday, August 25
Discussion of Epicurus. “Letter to Herodotus”
Discussion of Lucretius Books I, II.

HOMEWORK:
Lucretius Book III.

Sunday, August 27
ASSIGNMENT DUE: Essay #2 due at noon.
WEEK 3

Monday, August 28
8:15 a.m. (meet at Ikeda library steps) Getty Field Trip
HOMEWORK: Look over notes of Getty Field Trip


Tuesday, August 29
Discuss oral presentation assignment
Discussion of upcoming Essay #3.
Wednesday, August 30
In-class film screening: Patricio Guzman’s Nostalgia for the Light.
HOMEWORK: Work on Oral Presentations

Thursday, August 31
Oral Presentations in-class.

HOMEWORK: Bring a reading to class that relates to one of the texts we have read

Friday, September 1
Oral Presentations if needed

Core II

<!– /* Font Definitions */ @font-face {font-family:Arial; panose-1:2 11 6 4 2 2 2 2 2 4; mso-font-charset:0; mso-generic-font-family:auto; mso-font-pitch:variable; mso-font-signature:-536859905 -1073711037 9 0 511 0;} @font-face {font-family:"Courier New"; panose-1:2 7 3 9 2 2 5 2 4 4; mso-font-charset:0; mso-generic-font-family:auto; mso-font-pitch:variable; mso-font-signature:-536859905 -1073711037 9 0 511 0;} @font-face {font-family:"Cambria Math"; panose-1:2 4 5 3 5 4 6 3 2 4; mso-font-charset:0; mso-generic-font-family:auto; mso-font-pitch:variable; mso-font-signature:-536870145 1107305727 0 0 415 0;} @font-face {font-family:Cousine; mso-font-charset:0; mso-generic-font-family:auto; mso-font-pitch:auto; mso-font-signature:0 0 0 0 0 0;} /* Style Definitions */ p.MsoNormal, li.MsoNormal, div.MsoNormal {mso-style-unhide:no; mso-style-parent:""; margin:0in; margin-bottom:.0001pt; line-height:115%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:Arial; mso-fareast-font-family:Arial; color:black; mso-ansi-language:ES-AR; mso-fareast-language:ES-AR;} a:link, span.MsoHyperlink {mso-style-priority:99; color:blue; mso-themecolor:hyperlink; text-decoration:underline; text-underline:single;} a:visited, span.MsoHyperlinkFollowed {mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; color:purple; mso-themecolor:followedhyperlink; text-decoration:underline; text-underline:single;} .MsoChpDefault {mso-style-type:export-only; mso-default-props:yes; font-size:11.0pt; mso-ansi-font-size:11.0pt; mso-bidi-font-size:11.0pt; font-family:Arial; mso-ascii-font-family:Arial; mso-fareast-font-family:Arial; mso-hansi-font-family:Arial; mso-bidi-font-family:Arial; color:black; mso-ansi-language:ES-AR; mso-fareast-language:ES-AR;} .MsoPapDefault {mso-style-type:export-only; line-height:115%;} @page WordSection1 {size:8.5in 11.0in; margin:1.0in 1.0in 1.0in 1.0in; mso-header-margin:.5in; mso-footer-margin:.5in; mso-paper-source:0;} div.WordSection1 {page:WordSection1;} /* List Definitions */ @list l0 {mso-list-id:592400027; mso-list-template-ids:-1447374602;} @list l0:level1 {mso-level-number-format:bullet; mso-level-text:●; mso-level-tab-stop:none; mso-level-number-position:left; text-indent:.25in; text-decoration:none; text-underline:none;} @list l0:level2 {mso-level-number-format:bullet; mso-level-text:○; mso-level-tab-stop:none; mso-level-number-position:left; text-indent:.75in; text-decoration:none; text-underline:none;} @list l0:level3 {mso-level-number-format:bullet; mso-level-text:■; mso-level-tab-stop:none; mso-level-number-position:left; text-indent:1.25in; text-decoration:none; text-underline:none;} @list l0:level4 {mso-level-number-format:bullet; mso-level-text:●; mso-level-tab-stop:none; mso-level-number-position:left; text-indent:1.75in; text-decoration:none; text-underline:none;} @list l0:level5 {mso-level-number-format:bullet; mso-level-text:○; mso-level-tab-stop:none; mso-level-number-position:left; text-indent:2.25in; text-decoration:none; text-underline:none;} @list l0:level6 {mso-level-number-format:bullet; mso-level-text:■; mso-level-tab-stop:none; mso-level-number-position:left; text-indent:2.75in; text-decoration:none; text-underline:none;} @list l0:level7 {mso-level-number-format:bullet; mso-level-text:●; mso-level-tab-stop:none; mso-level-number-position:left; text-indent:3.25in; text-decoration:none; text-underline:none;} @list l0:level8 {mso-level-number-format:bullet; mso-level-text:○; mso-level-tab-stop:none; mso-level-number-position:left; text-indent:3.75in; text-decoration:none; text-underline:none;} @list l0:level9 {mso-level-number-format:bullet; mso-level-text:■; mso-level-tab-stop:none; mso-level-number-position:left; text-indent:4.25in; text-decoration:none; text-underline:none;} ol {margin-bottom:0in;} ul {margin-bottom:0in;}
Tomás Crowder-Taraborrelli

Soka University of America
Core 200-11 (1014), Spring, 2017
TuTh 1:00PM-2:30 PM Gan202
#core2sua
CORE II
The spirit of the corrupt mob said to the objects: I am yours, take me! and hurled itself into the river of objects, let itself be swept along by them and perished in the flood. 
G.W.F. Hegel
INTRODUCTION TO THE COURSE
This course examines how the central questions posed in Core I continue to be addressed in a contemporary context. Through readings on the environment, historical development of human societies, current issues of social inequality, as well as personal and group identities and relationships, Core II explores some of the major issues facing humanity today.
Thomas Piketty’s Capital in the Twenty-First Century (2013) ushered in a wave of articles around the world that gave legitimacy to what millions of people had been discussing for years- the steadfast growth of inequality in their communities. The consequence of the income gap between the wealthy and the poor is felt with greater intensity today, as we witness the rise of repressive regimes around the globe. In this course, we will be exploring inequality and state-repression as a way to reflect upon the strengths and weaknesses of our social institutions. I hope the readings I have chosen will help us develop theoretical approaches to analyze the root causes of the increase in inequality and its dreadful consequences.
RECOMMENDED BOOK
Hobsbawm, Eric. Age of Extremes: The Short Twentieth Century: 1914-1991. New
York: Vintage, 1996.
LABOR
   Daily class reflections: You must buy a pack of flashcards and bring them with you to every class. At the end of each class period, I will give you 10 minutes to reflect on the reading/s and discussion. On your flashcards, please write down a few notes on the topic of discussion and/or transcribe one or two quotes from the readings (make sure you include first and last name of the author, title of the essay or book, and page number).
   Complete common readings and any additional readings assigned specifically to you
   Attendance and participation at film screenings
   3 Short Papers
   Abstract and outline of your final presentation
   Final presentation
   Final Paper
ABBREVIATIONS
CR    Common Readings- Every student needs to do the reading and prepare for
class discussion
ARS   Assigned Reading to 1 student: The student who is assigned the reading
must prepare a 10-minute presentation on the reading and prepare to
engage with other readings or films scheduled for that day.
COURSE SCHEDULE

Tuesday, February 7th 1:00- 2:30 p.m.
Inoue, Asao B. “Reading as a Mindful Practice.” (CR) 3 pages
Yates, Michael D. “Measuring Global Inequality.” Monthly Review. (CR) 9
pages
Lenin, Vladimir. “Communism and the East: Theses on the National and Colonial
Questions.”Lenin Anthology. (ASR) 4 pages
Thursday, February 9th
Singer, Peter. “Common Objections to Giving.” The Life You Can Save: Acting
Now to End World Poverty. (CR) 10 pages
Stiglitz, Joseph E. “Inequality Is Not Inevitable.” (pgs 300-305). The Great
Divide: Unequal Societies and What We Can Do About Them. (ARS) 18 pages
Screening (in class): The Queen of Versailles. Dir. Lauren Greenfield, 2012.
Saturday, February 11th
Extra credit opportunity: Brothers Hypnotic. Dir. Reuben Atlas and Sam
Pollard, 2013. Black Box Theater, 5:30 p.m.
Tuesday February 14th
Rousseau, Jean Jacques. “A Dissertation On The Origin And Foundation Of The
Inequality Of Mankind: First Part.” (9-23) Discourse on Inequality.  
(CR) 15 pages
Rousseau, Jean Jacques. “A Dissertation On The Origin And Foundation Of The
Inequality Of Mankind.” (23-38) Discourse on Inequality.(ARS) 15
pages
Thursday February 16th
Kaplan, Jerry. “America, Home of the Brave.” Humans Need Not Apply: A Guide
to Wealth and Work in the Age of Artificial Intelligence. (CR)  [Last
chapter in the PDF] 20 pages
Lyotard, Jean-Francois. Universal History and Cultural Differences. The
Lyotard Reader. (ARS) 5 pages
Prompt for First Short Paper
Tuesday February 21st
Engels, Friedrich. “Competition,” “Irish Immigration,” and “Results.” The
Conditions of the Working Class in England (CR). 25 pages.
Proudhon, Pierre-Joseph. “A Self-Portrait,” and “Property is Theft.” No Gods
No Masters, ed. Daniel Guerin. (ARS). 9 pages
Lenin, Vladimir. “Two Resolutions on Party Policy.” Lenin Anthology (ARS). 4
pages
First Short Paper Due- Inequality.
Thursday February 23rd
Washington, Booker T. Chapters I, VI, VIII, X. Up From Slavery (CR). 25
pages.
Community Cinema Screening. 7 p.m. Pauling 216: The Bad Kids, dir. Keith Fulton & Lou Pepe. This is a mandatory screening!
Tuesday February 28th [away Conference]
Baldwin, James. “Preface to the 1984 Edition,” “Many Thousands Gone.” Notes
on a Native Son. (CR). 16 pages.
Screening in class: I’m Not Your Negro. Dir. Raoul Peck, 2016. [if
available] if not, James Baldwin: The Price of The Ticket. Dir. Karen Thorsen. 1990
Thursday March 2nd [away Conference]
Khatchadourian, Raffi. “Edward Burtynsky’s quest to photograph a changing
planet.” The New Yorker, December 19th & 26, 2016. (CR)
Hayek, F.A. “Individualism and Collectivism.” The Road to Serfdom. (ARS) 5
pages.
Prompt for Second Short Paper.
Tuesday March 7th [away Conference]
Dewey, John. The Live Creature. Art As Experience. (CR). 10 pages.
Screening (watch on your own):  Land Without Bread. Dir. Luis Buñuel, 1933.
Wednesday, March 8th [away Conference]
Mandatory event!!
Sancutary in the Age of Crimmigration. Gues Speaker, Ana Muniz.
6:00-7:00 p.m. Pauling Hall 216.
Thursday March 9th [away Conference]
Second Short Paper Due- Analysis of Land Without Bread.
Assignment, pick a movie on reserve in the library and watch it over the weekend.
La hora de los hornos [The Hour of the Furnaces]. Dir. Grupo de Cine
Liberación. 1st part only. [on reserve in the Library]
The Battle of Algiers. Dir. Gillo Pontecorvo, 1966.
The Exterminating Angel. Dir. Luis Buñuel, 1962.
Nostalgia for the Light. Dir. Patricio Guzmán. 2000 [on reserve in the
Library]
The Selfish Giant. Dir. Clio Barnard, 2013. [on reserve in the Library]
Up the Yangtze. Dir. Yu Chang, 2007. [on reserve in the Library]
Ici et Ailleurs. Dir. Dziga Vertov Group (Jean-Luc Godard), 1976. [on reserve
in the Library]
Tuesday March 14th
Marti, Jose. Selected Writings. (CR). 5 pages.
Flores Magon, Ricardo et. al. Reading of the Mexican Revolution. The Mexico
Reader. (ARS). 10 pages.
Thursday March 16th
Anna Muniz Talk.
Nietzche, Friedrich. “Book One,”. The Gay Science (selection). (CR). 23 pages.
Tuesday March 21st
Spring Break  
Thursday March 23rd
Spring Break  

Luxemburg, Rosa. “The Junius Pamphlet The Crisis in German Social Democracy.” Rosa Luxemburg Reader. (CR) 15 pages.
Tuesday March 28th
Menchú, Rigoberta.”An eight-year old agricultural worker,” “Death of her
little brother..,” “A maid in the Capital,”. I, Rigoberta Menchu: An Indian Woman in Guatemala. (CR). 23 pages
Black Lives Matter Statement: Guiding Principles. (ARS) 3 pages
Garza, Alicia. “A Herstory of the Movement.” 4 pages
Thursday March 30th
Du Bois, W.E.B. 1. Our Spiritual Strivings. 3. Of Mr. Booker T. Washington and Others. The Souls of Black Folk (CR). 11 pages. Screening (in class): Now. Dir. Santiago Alvarez.
Tuesday April 4th
Outlaw, Lucius T. (Jr.) “Against the Grain of Modernity: The Politics of Difference and the Conservation of ‘Race’.” On Race and Philosophy. (CR) 23 pages.
Biko, Steve. Foreword. “Black Souls,” “The Definitions…” I Write I like. (ARS) 12 pages.
Thursday April 6th
Arendt, Hannah. Chapter 5.”The Political Emancipation of the Bourgeoisie.”
      The Origins of Totalitarianism. (CR) 35 pages
Arendt, Hannah. Chapter 11. “The Totalitarian Movement.” The Origins of
Totalitarianism. (341- 364) (ARS) 24 pages
Arendt, Hannah. Chapter 11. “The Totalitarian Movement.” The Origins of
Totalitarianism. (364-388) (ARS) 25 pages
“Totalitarianism in the Age of Trump: Lessons from Hannah Arendt,” The
Guardian. February 2, 2017.
Tuesday April 11th
Améry, Jean. At The Mind’s Limits. (CR). 21 pages
Screening (in class): Night and Fog. Dir. Alain Resnais, 1956.
Thursday April 13th
Klemperer, Victor. “1935.” I Will Bear Witness: A Diary Of the Nazi Years
(1933-1941). (CR). 20 pages
Screening (in class): Triumph of the Will. Dir. Leni Riefenstahl, 1935.
Prompt Third Short Paper
Tuesday April 18th
West, Cornel. “Race And Modernity.” The Cornel West Reader. (CR). 34 pages
Thursday April 20th
Fanon. “Colonial War And Mental Disorders.” The Wretched of the Earth.
(249-280) 31 pages (CR)
Fanon. “Colonial War And Mental Disorders.” The Wretched of the Earth.
(280-310) 31 pages (ARS)
Screening (in class): Concerning Violence: Nine Scenes from the
Anti-Imperialistic Self-Defense. Dir. Goran Hugo Olsson, 2014. [Kanopy streaming]
Community Cinema Screening. 7 p.m. Pauling 216: National Bird, dir. Sonia Kennebeck. This is a mandatory screening!
Tuesday April 25th
Desnoes, Edmundo. “Inconsolable Memories. A Cuban View of the Missile Crisis.” (CR). 3 pages.
Screening (in class): The War Game. Dir. Peter Watkins, 1965.
Thursday April 27th
Screening (in class): Enron: The Smartest Boys in the Room. 2nd part.
Third short paper due.
Tuesday May 2nd
Pachedo, José Emilio. Battles in the Desert. 19 pages (CR)
Thursday May 4th
Baudrillard, Jean. “Catastrophe Management.” “The Dance of Fossils.” The Illusion of the End. (CR). 6 pages.
Outline of Final Paper due (1-2 pages)
Tuesday May 9th
Student Presentations
Thursday May 11t
Student Presentations
Tuesday May 16th
Study Day
May 17th- 23rd (Final Exams)
Final essay due by midnight (Date to be announced)

Bibliography
Arendt, H. (1979). The Political Emancipation of the Bourgeoisie. The origins Of Totalitarianism (pp. 122-157). San Diego: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich.
Baldwin, James. “Preface to the 1984 Edition,” “Many Thousands Gone.” Notes on a Native Son. (CR). 16 pages.
Baudrillard, J. (1994). The illusion of the end. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press.
Biko, S., & Stubbs, A. (1979). I write what I like. New York: Harper & Row.
Desnoes, Edmundo. (2004) “Inconsolable Memories. A Cuban View of the Missile Crisis.” Duke Press.
Dewy, John. (1934) The Live Creature. Art As Experience. The Penguin Group.
Du_Bois, W. E. (1961). The souls of black people: essays and sketches. Greenwich (Conn.): Fawcett Publications.
Engels, F. (1886). The condition of the working class in England. Great Britain: Penguin Books.
Fanon. (1963).  “Colonial War And Mental Disorders.” The Wretched of the Earth. Grove Press.
Flores Magon, Ricardo et. Al. (2003) Reading of the Mexican Revolution. The Mexico Reader. Duke Press.
Garza, Alicia. (October 7, 2014). A History of the #BlackLivesMAtter Movement by Alicia Garza. The Feminist Wire. Retrieved from http://www.thefeministwire.com/2014/10/blacklivesmatter-2/.
Guérin, D., & Sharkey, P. (2005). No gods, no masters. Edinburgh, Scotland: AK Press.
Hegel, G. W. F. (1977). Phenomenology of Spirit. London: Oxford University Press.
Inoue, A.B. (n.d). Reading as a Mindful Practice [Scholarly project].
Kadourian, Raffi. “Edward Burtynsky’s quest to photograph a changing planet.” The New Yorker, December 19th & 26, 2016
Kaplan, J. (2015). Humans need not apply: a guide to wealth and work in the age of artificial intelligence. New Haven: Yale University Press.
Khatchadourian, R. (2016, December 19). Edward Burtynsky’s quest to photography: a changing planet. The New Yorker, 80-87.
Klemperer, V. (1999). 1935. I will bear witness: a diary of the Nazi years 1933-1941 (pp. 108-   145). New York: Modern Library.
Lenin, V. I., & Tucker, R. C. (1975). The Lenin Anthology. New York: W.W. Norton & Company.
Luxemburg, R., Hudis, P., & Anderson, K. (2004). The Junius Pamphlet: The Crisis in German Social Democracy. The Rosa Luxemburg reader (pp. 313-341). New York: Monthly Review Press.
Lyotard, J. F. (1989). Universal History and Cultural Differences. In A. Benjamin (Ed.), The Lyotard Reader. Cambridge: Basil Blackwell.
Martí, J., Allen, E., & Echevarría, R. G. (2002). José Martí: selected writings. New York: Penguin Books.
Menchú, R., & Burgos-Debray. E. (1984). I, Rigoberta Menchú: an Indian woman in Guatemala. London: Verso.
Outlaw, L.T. (1996). On race and philosophy. New Yorker: Routledge.
Pacheco, José Emilio. (2001). Battles in the Desert. Ediciones Era.
Proudhon, Pierre-Joseph. (2005). “Self-Portrait,” and “Property is Theft.” No Gods No Masters. AK Press.  
Rousseau, Jean Jacques. “A Dissertation On The Origin And Foundation OF The Inequality Of Mankind: First Part.”
Singer, Petter (2009). Common Objections to Giving, The Life You Can Save (pp. 21-41). New York: Random House.
Stiglitz, J. E. (2015). The great divide: unequal societies and what we can do about them. New York: W.W. Norton & Company.
Washington, B. T. (2010). Up from slavery, an autobiography. New York: New American Library.
West, Cornel. (1999). “Race And Modernity.” The Cornel West Reader. Basic Civitas Books.
Yates, M. D. (2016, November 1). Measuring Global Inequality. Monthly Review. Retrieved from http://monthlyreview.org
We Affirm that All Black Lives Matter. Black Lives Matter Statement: Guiding Principles. Retrieved from http://blacklivesmatter.com/guiding-principles

Digital Humanities

Tomás Crowder-Taraborrelli
Humanities 290-01 (1169) Digital Humanities, Spring 2017
Tu. Th. 3:00-4:30 PM Gan202
#digitalmediasua



DIGITAL HUMANITIES

When machines and computers, profit motives and property rights, are considered more important than people, the giant triplets of racism, extreme materialism and militarism are incapable of being conquered

Martin Luther King, The Riverside Church in New York, 1967


…nothing is so frightening as a labyrinth with no center.

Borges, citing G.K. Chesterton


INTRODUCTION

This course explores the intersection between digital technology and media with academic research in the Humanities. In recent years, this area of studies has flourished into one of the most popular and well-funded fields of inquiry. The corporate takeover of the Internet has prompted researchers to reflect on the impact that social networks, digital archiving, computer interfaces, and online communication, has had and will have on academic research, publishing, and social relations in general. Most authors we will be reading and discussing this semester seem to agree that the each year the arrival of new technologies in the consumer market appears to be intensifying. These new technologies both threaten and enhance our understanding of the capacities of human beings to remember, preserve, reproduce and represent reality. I hope that this course will grant us the opportunity to better understand the challenges and high hopes that digital technologies bring to the global community.


ASSIGNMENTS:

   All assignments for this course must be uploaded to a blog. Your blog should be dedicated only to this course. You can upload images, videos, links, and files to your blog. Please keep in mind that all your assignments need to be uploaded by the deadline(10%)
   Complete common readings and any additional readings assigned specifically to you(20%)
   Attendance and participation at film screenings (20%)
   8 writing assignments (15% each)
   Abstract and outline of your final presentation (10%)
   Final presentation (10%)
   Final Paper (15%)

ABBREVIATIONS

CR    Common Readings- Every student needs to do the reading and prepare for
class discussion
ARS   Assigned Reading to 1 student: The student who is assigned the reading
must prepare a 5-10 minutes presentation on the reading and prepare to
engage with other readings or films scheduled for that day.

COURSE SCHEDULE

Tuesday, February 7th
Digital Humanities, why should we care?
Liu, Alan. The Meaning of Digital Humanities: What is the meaning of the
digital humanities to the humanities? (CR)11 pages
Mande, Joe. How I Learned To Game Twitter. The New Yorker (CR)
The World Unplugged (ARS) 4 pages
Thursday February 9th
Digital humanities discussion continues…
Golumbia, David. “Death of a Discipline.” A Journal of Feminist Cultural
Studies. (CR) 17 pages
Mone,Gregory. What’s Next For Digital Humanities?: New Computational Tools
Spur Advances In An Evolving Field,” Communications of the ACM. (ARS) 2
Pages
Visualizing Venice
Tuesday February 14th
Computer history: The perils of standardization
Ceruzzi, Paul. Introduction and “The Early History of Software 1952-1968. A
History of Modern Computing. (CR). 22 pages.
Ceruzzi, Paul. “The Personal Computer, 1972-1977.” A History of Modern
Computing. (207-221)(ARS) 15 pages
Ceruzzi, Paul. “The Personal Computer, 1972-1977.” A History of Modern
Computing. (221-241)(ARS) 20 pages
Thursday February 16th
Negroponte, Nicholas. “Commingled Bits.” Being Digital. (CR) 13 pages
Negroponte, Nicholas. “Where People and Bits Meet.” Being Digital. (ARS) 14
pages
Negroponte, Nicholas. “Less is More.” Being Digital.(ARS) 11 pages
The Entire History of You. Black Mirror [sequence screened in class]
Tuesday February 21st
Manovich, Lev. “Principles of New Media.” The Language of New Media. (CR) 22
pages.   
Manovich, Lev. “What New Media Is Not.” The Language of New Media. (ARS) 13
pages.
Cadwalladr, Carole. “Google, Democracy And The Truth About Internet Search.”
The Guardian. (ARS) 11 pages
Discussion of The Entire History of You. Black Mirror.
Thursday February 23rd [away conference]
Digital technology and education
Blikstein, Paulo. “Travels In Troy With Freire”.(CR) 26 pages
Freire, Paulo. “Chapter 1.  Society In Transition. Education for
Critical Consciousness. (ARS) 8 pages.
Negroponte, Nicholas. “Hard Fun.” Being Digital. (ASR). 10 pages
7 p.m. Pauling 216. Community Cinema Event: The Bad Kids, dir. Keith Fulton & Lou Pepe.
Tuesday February 28th [away conference]
No class to make up for mandatory screening Feb. 23rd.
e, Lee and Barry Wellman. “Interlude: A Day in a Connected Life,”
Networked: The New Social Operating System.(CR) 12 pages
Thursday March 2nd [away conference]
Prompts for first paper
Assignment: Pick a movie on reserve in the library and watch it over the weekend.
Black Mirror. [Pick an episode. Streaming Netflix].
We Are Legion. The Story of Hacktivists. Brian Knappenberger, 2012. [on reserve in the Library]
Citizenfour. Dir. Laura Poitras, 2014. [on reserve in the Library]
Tuesday March 7th [away conference]
van Dijck, Jose. Mediated Memories as a Conceptual Too. Mediated Memories in the Digital Age. 26 pages (CR)
Thursday March 9th [away conference]
Watch The Internet’s Own Boy: The Story of Aron Swartz. Dir. Brian Knappenberger (2014).
Tuesday March 14th
Marwick, Alice. “Introduction.” Status Update: Celebrity, publicity, and
branding in the social media age. (CR) 19 pages
Marwick, Alice. “Self-Branding.” Status Update: Celebrity, publicity, and
branding in the social media age. (163-181) (ARS) 18 pages (Presentation)
Marwick, Alice. “Self-Branding.” Status Update: Celebrity, publicity, and
branding in the social media age. (181-204)(ARS) 23 pages (Presentation)
First essay due at 10 a.m.
Thursday March 16th
Segovia, Kathryn and Jeremy N. Bailenson.”Identity Manipulation What Happens
When Identity Presentation is Not Truthful.” The Social Net: Understanding our online behavior. Ed. Yair Amichai-Hamburger. (CR) 13 pages
Margalit, Ruth. “Should Auschwitz Be A Site For Selfies?” The New
Yorker, 2014. (ARS)3 pages
Short film of the Yolocaust (‘Holocaust Selfies’)
“Selfies at Auschwitz: When Tourism Destroys the Meaning of Memory.”
Yolocaust Video
Tuesday March 21st
Galloway, Alexander R. “Introduction: The Computer as a Mode of Mediation.”
The Interface Effect. (CR) 24 pages
Galloway, Alexander R. ”Software and Ideology.” The Interface Effect. (ARS)
23 pages.
Doulas Engelbart Demo (clip screened in class)
Thursday March 23rd
Thomas, Douglas. “(Not) Hackers: Subculture, Style, and Media Incorporation.”
Hacker Culture. (CR) 31 pages
Tuesday March 28th
Can machines think? AI
Kaplan, Jerry. “Introduction: Welcome to the Future,” “America, Land of the
Free Shipping.” Humans Need Not Apply: A Guide to Wealth and Work in the Age of Artificial Intelligence.(CR) 14 pages
Kaplan, Jerry. “America, Land of the Free Shipping.” Humans Need Not Apply: A
Guide to Wealth and Work in the Age of Artificial Intelligence.(ARS) 11 pages
Thursday March 30th
Herrera, Linda. “Wired Youth Rise,” Revolution in the Age of Social Media:
The Egyptian Popular Insurrection and the Internet. (1-24) (CR) 24 pages
Herrera, Linda. “Cyberdissident Diplomacy,” Revolution in the Age of Social
Media: The Egyptian Popular Insurrection and the Internet. (1-24) (ARS)
22 pages
Gerbaudo, Paolo. “Friendly Reunions: Social Media and The choreography Assembly.” Tweets and the Streets. Social Media and Contemporary Activism. (CR) 30 pages.
Gerbaudo, Paolo. “Introduction.” Tweets and the Streets. Social Media and Contemporary Activism.(ARS) 17 pages.
Heller, Nathan. “The Failure of Facebook Democracy.” The New Yorker, 2016. (ARS) 4 pages
Tuesday April 4th
Baym, Nancy K. “Communities and Networks,” “New Relationships, new Selves.”
Personal Connections in the Digital Age. (CR) 31 pages
      In Real Life, dir. Beeban Kidron, 2014 (sequence screened in class). 0.:50.
Kirsch, Adam. “Technology is Taking Over English Departments: False Promise of the Digital Humanities.” The New Republic.
Thursday April 6th
Networked communities
Baym, Nancy K. “Communities and Networks,” “New Relationships, new Selves.”
Personal Connections in the Digital Age. (CR) 31 pages (continue)
Vaidhyanathan, Siva Introd. “The Googlization of Memory: Information
Overload, Filters, and the Fracturing of Knowledge,” The Googlization
of Everything And Why We Should Worry. (ASR). 13 pages
Tuesday April 11th
Network communities (continued)
Rainie, Lee and Barry Wellman. “Networked Families.” Networked:
The New Social Operating System. (CR) 24 pages.
Baudrillard, Jean. “The Ecstasy of Communication,” The Ecstasy of
Communication. (ARS) 12 pages
“Meet Erica- Erica Man Made”
Tuesday April 13th
Library workshop with Helen Alexander and Jan Fandrich
Morville, Peter. “The Sociosemantic Web.” Ambient Findability. (CR) 35 pages.
Tuesday April 18th
Wikipedia
Shirky, Clay. “Personal Motivation Meets Collaborative Production.”
      (ARS)33 pages
Shirky, Clay. “Sharing Anchors Community,” Here Comes Everybody The
Power of Organizing Without Organizations. (CR) 30 pages
Thursday April 20th
Surveillance and war
Vaidhyanathan, Siva. “The Googlization of Us: Universal Surveillance and
Infrastructural Imperialism.” The Googlization of Everything (And Why We Should Worry). (82-98) (CR) 15 pages
Vaidhyanathan, Siva. “The Googlization of Us: Universal Surveillance and
Infrastructural Imperialism.” The Googlization of Everything (And Why We Should Worry). (98-114) (ARS) 14 pages
Community Cinema screening. National Bird. 7 p.m. Pauling 216. (screening mandatory, make up for class)
Tuesday April 25th
Literature and Digital Technology
Hayles, Katherine. “The Future of Literature: Print Novels and the
Mark of the Digital.” Electronic Literature: New Horizons for the
Literary. (CR) 28 pages
Vaidhyanathan, Siva Introd. “The Googlization of Knowledge: The Future of
Books.” The Googlization of Everything And Why We Should Worry. (ARS) 24 pages.
Lo and Behold: Reveries of the Connected World. Dir. Wernerz Herzog, 2016.
https://www.netflix.com/title/80097363(1:09:39 III The Dark Side)
Interview to N. Katherine Hayles
Thursday April 27th
Van Dijck, Jose. “From Shoebox to Digital Memory Machine.” Mediated Memories In The Digital Age. (ARS)
Friend, Tad. “Silicon Valley’s Quest to Live Forever.” The New Yorker. 3/27/2017
2045 Strategic Social Initiative http://2045.com/
Screening in class: The Entire History of You. Black Mirror.
Tuesday May 2nd
Knowledge and Memory
Aiden, Erez and J.B. Michel. “Armchair Lexicographerologists,” Uncharted Big
Data as a Lens on Human Culture. (CR). 27 pages
Aiden, Erez and J.B. Michel.“Utopia, Dystopia and Dat(A)topia,”Uncharted Big
Data as a Lens on Human Culture. (ARS) 28 pages
Cultural Observatory, Ngram Viewer: http://www.culturomics.org/home
Thursday May 4th
Abstract of Final project is due (1-2 pages)
Tuesday May 9th
Student Presentations of Final Project
Thursday May 11th
Student Presentations of Final Project
Tuesday May 16th
Study Day
May 17th- 23rd (Final Exams)
Final essay due by midnight (Date to be announced)

Digital Humanities Bibliography 
Aiden, E., & Michel, J. (2013). Uncharted: big data as lens on human culture. New York: Riverhead Books, a member of Penguin Group (USA).
Amichai-Hanburger, Y. (2005). The Social net: understanding human behavior in cyberspace. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
Baudrillard, J. (1994). The illusion of the end. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press.
Baym, N.K. (2010). Personal connections in the digital age. Cambridge, UK: Polity.
Blikstein, P. (1992). Introduction. Travels in Troy with Freire.
Boyd, D. (2014). It’s Complicated: The Social Lives of Network Teens. London: Yale University Press.
Cadwalladr, C. (2016). Google, democracy and the truth about internet search.  The Guardian. Retrieved December 5, 2016, from http://www.theguardian.com/
Ceruzzi, P. E. (2003) A history of modern computing. London, Eng.: MIT Press.
Freire, P. (1973). Society in Transition. Education for Critical Consciousness. New York: Seabury.
Friend, Tad. (2017). “Silicon Valley’s Quest to Live Forever.” The New Yorker.
Morville, Peter. “The Sociosemantic Web.” Ambient Findability.
Galloway, A. R. (2012). The interface effect. Cambridge, UK: Polity.
Garbaudo, P. (2012). Tweets and the streets: social media and contemporary activism. London: Pluto Press.
Golumbia, D. (2014). Death of a Discipline. A Journal of Feminist Cultural Studies, 25(1), 156-176. Duke University Press.
Hayles, K. (2008). The Future of Literature. Electronic Literature: New Horizons for the Library (pp. 159-186). Notre Dame: University of Notre Dame.
Heller, N. (2016). The Failure of Facebook Democracy. The New Yorker. Retrieved November 22,2016.
Herrera, Linda. (2014). Revolution in the Age of Social Media: The Egyptian Popular Insurrection and the Internet. Verso.
Jenkins, H. (2006).  Converge culture: where old and new media collide. New York: New York University Press.
Kaplan, Jerry. (2015). Humans Need Not Apply: A Guide to Wealth and Work in the Age of Artificial Intelligence. Yale University Press.
Liu, A. (2013). The Meaning of the Digital Humanities. The Changing Profession, 128 (10), pp 409-423.
Mande, J. (2016). How I learned to Game Twitter. The New Yorker. Retrieved November 29, 2016.
Manovich, Lev. (2001). “What New Media Is Not.” The Language of New Media. The MIT Press.
Margalit, R. (2016). Should Auschwitz Be a Site for Selfies?. The New Yorker. Retrieved January 9, 2017.
Marwick, A. E. (2013). Status update: celebrity, publicity, and branding in the social media age. New Haven: Yale University Press.
Mone, G. (2016). What’s Next for Digital Humanities. Society, 59(6), 20-21.
Morville, Peter. “The Sociosemantic Web.” Ambient Findability.
Negroponte, N. (1995). Being Digital. New York: Knopf.
Rainie, H., & Wellman, B. (2012). Networked: The New Social Operating System. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.
Segovia, Kathryn and Jeremy N. Bailenson. (2013). ”Identity Manipulation What Happens When Identity Presentation is Not Truthful.” The Social Net: Understanding our online behavior. Ed. Yair Amichai-Hamburger.
Shirky, C. (2018). Here comes everybody: the power of organizing without organizations. New York: Penguin Press.
Thomas, D. (2002) (Not)Hackers: Subculture, Style, and Media Incorporation. Hcker culture (pp. 141-171). Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press.
Vaidhyanathan, S. (2011). The Goolization of everything: (and why we should worry). Berkley: University of California Press.
van Dijck, J. (2007). Mediated Memories as a Conceptual Too Mediated Memories in the Digital Age. Stanford University Press.  

Courses taught at Stanford University

Stanford Postdoctoral Fellow


HUM 38B Roots and Routes: Narrative Geographies of the Americas
Two-quarter sequence. Colonialism, transnationalism, migration and immigration, and gender and language in the Americas through novels and shorter pieces from the Latin American, Chicano/a, and Latino/traditions. (Brotherston, Rosa, Yarbro-Bejarano)


HUM 25A,B. Art and Ideas: Performance and Practice
Two-quarter sequence. Issues in aesthetics and performance through examples from the classical age to the present. Concepts of art and practice intersecting with topics such as imitation, instruction through pleasure, the creative process, perception, social analysis, and embodiment as a form of knowledge. Texts and performances from drama, dance, music, visual arts, and performance art practices that reflect aesthetic ideas. GER:IHUM-2,3 IHUM 25A. 5 units, Win (Rayner) IHUM 25B. 5 units, Spr (Ross)


HUM 46. Visions of Mortality
Anyone reading this is alive, and so will someday die. Issues arising from these facts of life and death beginning with the most fundamental questions arising from the first-person confrontation with thoughts of one’s own mortality. Is death bad for a person, and if so, why? What can the badness or the indifference of death tell us about what makes life good? If death is the permanent end of existence, does this make human choices arbitrary, and life meaningless? GER:IHUM-1 5 units, Aut (Barrett, Bobonich)


HUM 62. Conflict, Cooperation, and Human Nature
Forms of social interaction and their relationship with what makes people human. The focus is on the construction of family systems, warfare, and slavery as uniquely human activities. How people manipulate classifications such as the nonhuman in an effort to define a potential spouse, an opponent in war, or a slave. Sources include anthropology, history, and comparative perspectives. GER:IHUM-1 5 units, Aut (Hilde, Jones)


HUM 8A,9A. Myth and Modernity: Culture in Germany
Two-quarter sequence. The tension between tradition and progress through an examination of German cultural history. The experience of modernity typically involves overcoming or denying the past, but that same past can return to haunt the present in the form of myths. The interplay of myth and modernity, the irrationality of narrative, and the reason of progress, through the example of German culture, especially in literature, from the heroic epics of the medieval era through the catastrophes of the last century. GER:IHUM-2,3 IHUM 8A. 5 units, Win (Berman) IHUM 9A. 5 units, Spr (Eshel, Strum)


Cursos online

Núcleo Educativo Cine Documental
(aún a precios 2012) 


La chica del sur (2012)

Investigación y guión para el desarrollo de documentales
 
8 clases – Workshop – Clínica de guiones – Fragmentos de documentales  – Textos complementarios y entrevistas con los cineastas – Campus virtual con Foro y chat (no requiere la instalación de ningún programa) – Se otorgan certificados

 
Dictado por: Tomás Crowder-Taraborrelli y Javier Campo
Cierre de inscripción: 14 de marzo de 2014.
Comienzo: 17 de marzo de 2014.
Informes e inscripción: 

cursos@cinedocumental.com.ar
 
 

Historia del cine documental argentino
(Actualizado 2014)

En 8 clases durante 2 meses.
Cierre de inscripción: 14 de marzo de 2014.
Comienzo: 17 de marzo de 2014.
Se entregan certificados.

Proposal

LEARNING CLUSTER, ARGENTINA 2013



Soka University Learning Cluster 2013: Sustainable Housing and Urban Development in Buenos Aires, Argentina




Time-lapse video of the construction of the adobe studio

The process of building your home will be one of the greatest, and hopefully, most rewarding challenges in your life

Lisa Schroeder and Vince Ogletree authors of Adobe Homes For All Climates

Introduction

Why have homes become unaffordable for most people in the world? Is it due to the cost of land, the price of construction, property taxes, and/or public services? Why must one hire an architect or an engineer when, with limited training, one can build a home by hiring just a few workers? This Learning Cluster will explore ways in which many people in the developing world have built houses with reclaimed, environmentally sound and aesthetically pleasing materials. We will also explore the connections between this type of sustainable, accessible development and links to the concept of leading a self-sufficient mortgage-free and debt free life.

While earthship style sustainable adobe homes are fast becoming trendy in many parts of the developed world, this type of construction has long been practiced in Argentina. Indigenous communities built their homes with adobe; many of them are still standing in the Northern part of the country. Pioneer adobe builder Jorge Belanko, mentored by Professor Gernot Minke, founder of Earth Architecture, has committed his life to building adobe houses in the south of Argentina and to teaching others the simple construction methods. Belanko produced a well-known didactic documentary film that demonstrates the different techniques in earth building. He argues in Las manos, el barro, la casa that since the 1930s, construction with earth has been deemed to be for “poor” people; that a whole business was built around the concept that “hard materials” like concrete, are longer lasting, more elegant, and more valuable. Belanko, is one of many Argentines, redeeming an indigenous building practice that is cost-effective, easy to accomplish, environmentally sound, aesthetically pleasing, and safe. Earth building as demonstrated by the interest in Belanko’s work, is particularly popular in countries like Argentina where building materials are expensive.

Increasingly people when building homes demand energy-and cost-effective buildings that emphasise a healthy, balanced indoor climate. They are coming to realise that mud, as a a natural building material, is superior to industrial building materials such as concrete, brick and lime-sandstone. Newly developed, advanced earth building techniques demonstrate the value of earth not only in do-it-yourself construction, but also for industrialised construction involving contractors. 
Gernot Minke


Purpose of the Learning Cluster

This Learning Cluster will examine the social, economic, and environmental problems of housing and urban development in Buenos Aires, one of Latin America’s most populous cities, and ways in which sustainable adobe construction is being positioned by many as a possible solution. Since the 1970s, metropolitan areas in Latin America have grown dramatically, as has the income inequality between the wealthy and the poor. Slums commonly referred to as villas miserias, have increasingly become perilous ways for the poor to gain access to housing. In the last decades, the wealthy, in part influenced by unrelenting media stories about crime and insecurity have moved to the suburbs to build luxurious homes in gated communities. Conversely, slums like the well-known Villa 31 in Buenos Aires continue to expand, presenting their own sets of complex environmental issues. By analyzing ways in which sustainable housing can safely and efficiently modify the living standards in the slums, this course will assuredly transform the skepticism about sustainable housing and provide for a more educated approach to urban development in Latin America. Urban transformation has had profound cultural, social, and political consequences for society at large.

During the first part of this travel course, we will study the rich architectural history of Buenos Aires, once considered to be the “Paris” of Latin America because of its neoclassical
buildings and wide boulevards. We will consider the decisive historical events that have shaped its urban identity. We will visit traditionally wealthy neighborhoods like Barrio Norte, working class neighborhoods like La Boca, and neighborhoods that are currently experiencing rapid transformation due to a real estate boom like Palermo Soho, Palermo Hollywood, and Puerto Madero. We will also visit the politically charged Villa 31, a slum that was built in one of the wealthiest neighborhoods of the city. Mercedes Maria Weiss, professor of art-history and architecture at the University of Buenos Aires, will lead seminars on urban history and development for our LC. The objective of these seminars will be to understand the economic and political forces that have ordered and regulated the construction of neighborhoods and housing along economic lines.

During the second part of the course, we will travel to Ingeniero Maschwitz, in the Northern part of the city, and participate on an eco-construction team with plastic artist Pablo Salvadó, whose work was exhibited in the Soka University Art Gallery in 2008. We will participate in helping to build a sustainable adobe building. This building will eventually be completely self-sufficient and off the electricity, water and sewage grid.

Students will have hands-on experience in the design and construction of a low-impact natural building that requires little training in construction. Students will form teams according to their interests. These teams will be coordinated by Professor Crowder-Taraborrelli:

* a design team ( which will draw plans for the structure of the building)

* a budget team (which will calculate costs for purchasing equipment and materials)

*an environmental and services team (which will asses the resources available in the area, design and install electricity and water access)

* a building team (which will coordinate the field work)

The building workshop will run from 9A.M.-5 P.M. Plastic artist Pablo Salvadó will provide all materials and tools. Among the many skills students will learn during the workshop on earth building are: laying out a rock foundation and perimeter drain, building small and medium size walls with discarded car tires, mixing adobe and plastering walls with adobe (clay), and participating in the design of a sustainable garden. In order to capture this experience, the students will create a short documentary (10-15 minutes) to be presented at the Learning Cluster Fair. This short documentary will help to educate SUA students about the practical, structural, and societal effects of living a sustainable life, as well as the positive effects on the environment and humanity.

Residence in Phoenix, Arizona. Built with rammed earth walls. Architect: Eddie Jones

Course Objectives

1.Gain a deeper understanding of the significance of sustainable living where environmentally stable housing and financial security is under threat.

2. Research the process and practice of sustainable construction using both recycled and natural resources.

3.Perform a comparative study between southern California and the province of Buenos Aires in regards to property management and building permit regulations where sustainable construction is concerned.

4.Critically analyze the contrasting architectural styles as well as the use of materials among affluent and impoverished communities.

5. Create meaningful relationships between the group and organizations in Argentina dedicated to building sustainable homes.

6. Facilitate discussions that encourage social change through community activism.

Learning Outcomes

Team building; experience hands on learning; production and construction of a documentary.

As the universal movement for sustainable living collects momentum, the students of this Learning Cluster will have a much more expansive and tangible understanding of what it takes to bring the theory of sustainable living into practice. By visiting and exploring wealthy and poor neighborhoods alike, students will gain knowledge of both the materials and resources that have been utilized, in a highly contrasting way, to create the city of Buenos Aires. Students will aspire to achieve the following learning outcomes in a variety of ways:

Develop students’ habits of independent inquiry and study: Prior to leaving for Argentina, all students will form research teams and present their findings to the rest of the class. The documentary aspect of the project in Argentina will provide another avenue for independent growth, as students will be able to develop their own questions to be asked in interviews as well as organize visual material to complement the pedagogical objectives of the Learning Cluster.

Engender analytical and investigative skills and the ability to apply them to a specific problem or question: During their first week in Argentina students will develop questions and expectations based both on their own research as well as research presented by their classmates. During the second and third weeks, they will combine this research with firsthand experience in order to understand how to bridge the gap between theory and practice.

Enhance the ability to work collaboratively: Students will be working together to organize the trip, develop the documentary interviews, divide the subject matter, and create a cohesive final project. They will also have to develop a steadfast work ethic to include all team members, both domestic and international, who will be collaborating and contributing to the success of the project. The experience in its entirety will require students to depend on each other’s skills, including Spanish speaking abilities, different cultural understandings, and creative writing talents.

Foster a contributive ethic by working on issues that have a larger social significance or meaning: The creation of sustainable housing not only benefits the immediate community and the environment directly, but also ripples out to provide an alternative way to build a house for people who cannot afford the standard industrialized, corporate approach to building. Our documentary will further contribute to spreading awareness about the feasibility of and access to resources for this type of construction.

Prepare students for their roles as engaged global citizens: Through personal encounters, new experiences, hands on creation, community collaboration, inquiry into government regulations, critical evaluation of materials and resources, and an overall objective of contributing to the sustainability of humanity, this experience in Argentina will help deepen the understanding of what it means to be a global citizen.

Impact on SUA Community

Upon return, students from this Learning Cluster will attempt to impact the SUA community in an innovative manner that will shed light upon the environmental inquiries that are still very much alive on-campus. Once we learn the techniques of building an earth structure, we will be able to impart this knowledge to those who are willing to learn and take action. Bringing awareness of our LC project to the SUA community will allow for a gradual shift in the way our generation perceives sustainable living in the United States, and especially, in Orange County. Understanding, for instance, the implications of renewable and solar energy will help Soka students realize that we each have the capacity to push the “eco-friendly–go green” movement even further. This will instill a sense of pride in our students to contribute to the global community on an exceedingly prudent and moral level. These earth ships prove that humanity is capable of “doing more”. SUA can be one of the first campuses to realize the potential and effectiveness of these living standards.

Soka takes great pride in the Language and Culture Program. Close to 90% of our LC class is studying the Spanish language. By traveling to Argentina to experience the culture and life in Latin America, we can share our discoveries and challenges in working in another language with fellow students back home. We envision that this LC’s travel component will empower others to better their language skills by immersing themselves in a Spanish speaking culture.

Finally, the meaning behind the word “Soka”—to create value—is also tied into our LC’s belief that through the creation of sustainable living spaces, we can create value on our own. A home is one of the most quintessential parts of being human. Humans need shelter, and creating a home can both accomplish that goal and represent part of the human identity within society. By collaborating together as a team to build this sustainable living space, this LC re-defines what value means within the home. A home is not just composed of nails, wood and paint–it can be composed of matter that we recycle, of matter that is part of the earth we live on. Giving, instead of taking is what matters most in this paradigm for sustainable dwellings. We feel that such a message will resonate with the SUA community. Can value be created within a home? Why is it important to give back? These are some of the working questions that define our Learning Cluster.

Significance of Fieldwork and Location

While abroad, this Learning Cluster will study the architectural history of Buenos Aires, as well as construct a true realization of sustainable architecture. As sustainable architecture is still in its infancy, contributing to a fully self-sustaining housing project is a rare opportunity that can influence the current perception and future of sustainable eco-housing. The structure that we will leave in Argentina will be a unique and significant step towards a more sustainable world. It will advertise itself to the local community, but we plan to spread additional awareness through an instructional documentary. While much of our studies are for the course members, this endeavor is about proving that “off the grid” living is not only possible, but cost effective and feasible. We hope to inspire and instigate future architectural experimentation and innovation.

Buenos Aires is the heart and spirit of Argentina, and the focus of this LC. Touring the city and buildings in Argentina is vital in this critical study to decipher the distinct differences between communities within the city. Understanding Urban Development in Buenos Aires, Argentina plays a large role in understanding how sustainable housing can be successful in nearby communities.

This LC also seeks to analyze the architectural and aesthetic styles of housing in the city, in collaboration with a local non-profit institution called Techo. Like this LC, Techo advocates the importance of strengthening urban development on social policies in impoverished areas. More pertinent to this course, Techo builds an environment where sustainable communities exist in order to improve the quality of life for those who are struggling to survive in Buenos Aires and its surrounding neighborhoods. By gaining a deeper understanding of the area as the students travel to contrasting locations, they will be able to engage with the community members and discuss how they can help impact the community on the social and cultural facet of this study. What is really at risk here is that the public in Argentina lacks awareness about sustainable housing. This course will help them see that this is a cost-effective manner of living that is easily accessible.

The opportunity given to the students to travel to Argentina will profoundly affect the way in which these students comprehend the rapidly growing slums at a time in which an unstable and unforgiving economy exists for all. They are found in rural areas and as well as in populous cities such as in Buenos Aires. According to July 2004 estimates, there are about 640 precarious neighborhoods in suburban Buenos Aires, comprising of 690,000 residents and 111,000 households. The population of the villas miserias in the city of Buenos Aires property doubled during the 1990s, reaching about 120,000 as of 2005, which is continuously growing today. These statistics show how important it is to study the reasons behind not only how both slums, such as “neighborhoods of misery” and cities are built and where they are located, but also of laying the foundation for the causes and reasons for why they exist.

Vineyard Residence, Victoria Australia. Rammed earth walls. John Wardle Architects.

Itinerary, course reading and activities

Dates: Monday, January 7th- Wednesday, January 30th 2013

Week 1

Monday Jan. 7

ON-CAMPUS
9-12:00 pm GAN 209

Review syllabus with the class and course/objective overview. Assign group and/or individual research based questions and topics for course. Assign readings for annotated bibliography.
Evaluation of costs for purchasing equipment and materials. Update budget.
Discuss reading: Wilson, pgs. 1-55, Phillips 148-165 (Angel).
Start building blog/LC website for fair
Take picture of LC group (Charlie Kerhin)
In class training session to prepare construction of adobe structure.
Screening: Garbage Warrior

Tuesday Jan 8

ON-CAMPUS

9-12:00 pm GAN 209

Overview of history of urban development in Buenos Aires, Argentina since the 1970’s
Overview of sustainable housing in/around Buenos Aires, Argentina (Techo website)

http://www.untechoparamipais.org/argentina/colecta2012/
Discuss Reading: Wilson, Part 1 and 3.
Continue working on website
Team tasks: Begin working on construction plan
Discussion of Garbage Warrior
Screening: Las manos, el barro, la casa 1st part

Wednesday Jan 9:

ON-CAMPUS

9-12:00 pm GAN 209

Each group presents on their group’s objectives and planning.
Screening: Las manos, el barro.
Discuss documentary and its implications.
Discuss reading: Carns, Chapter 7 and Sanchez Chapter 1.
Continue working on website and construction plan

Thursday Jan 10

ON-CAMPUS

9-12:00 pm GAN 209

Go over the itinerary to make sure all activities are scheduled
Finalize construction plan and send it to Pablo
Continue building blog/website
Screening: Earthship-Britanny Groundhouse

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=krWgtnJRAUg&feature=related

Friday Jan 11

EN ROUTE TO BUENOS AIRES

Saturday Jan 12

BUENOS AIRES, ARGENTINA

Meeting time TBA depending on flight arrival.
Reading: Phillips, Chapter 14 and 16. Teams discuss reading according to their team topic and assignment
Water, discuss reading: Ludwig, Chapter 7.
Meet with collaborating institution, Techo representatives and conduct short interview to better understand community development in the Buenos Aires region.

7PM: Daily Reflection

Sunday Jan 13:

BUENOS AIRES, ARGENTINA

9AM-12PM: Meet to prepare for week two and discuss travel and earth ship construction.

10AM-1PM: Architectural tour of the Center of Buenos Aires with Professor Weiss. Compare styles of construction and techniques with earth architecture and green building.

1PM-2PM: Lunch in San Telmo with Pablo Salvado

5PM: Meet at Tomas’ apartment. Teams present list of objectives and tasks during construction of earth building. Discuss reading: Minke, Chapter 2 and 3, Fryer Chapters 4 and 5.

7PM: Work on blogs on LC website. Upload photographs.

Week 2

Monday Jan 14:

BUENOS AIRES, ARGENTINA

9AM-12PM: City tour

12PM-2PM: Lunch

2PM-4PM: Design of earth building-teams offer suggestions for building techniques. Discuss readings: Schroder, Ogletree, Chapters 2, 3, 4, 5.

5PM: Meeting with plastic artist Salvado to discuss plans for earth structure. Demonstration of labor— how to utilize sustainable materials for successful building. Become familiar with materials as a group.

7PM: Daily Reflection

Tuesday Jan 15:

BUENOS AIRES CITY or ON SITE?
Un techo: meeting with members of NGO
12-2PM: Lunch
17:30 or 18:00 Meeting with Economist Alexis Dritsos.

Wednesday Jan 16:

ON-SITE Day 1

8AM: Breakfast

9AM: Depart by bus for Ingeniero Maschwitz.

10AM: Arrive at location. Meet with plastic artist Pablo Salvado. Foundation work.

12PM: Lunch

1-5PM: Continue work on draining ditch and foundation. Discuss reading: Hunter Chapter 4.

5PM: Return to city.

7PM: Dinner

8PM: Daily Reflection on Angel. Teams meet to discuss progress of earth building.

Thursday Jan 17:

ON-SITE Day 2

8AM: Breakfast

9AM: Depart by bus for Ingeniero Maschwitz.

10AM: Arrive at location

12PM: Lunch

1-5PM: Continue construction of on-site project. Wall, windows, draining.

5PM: Return to city

6PM: Dinner

8PM: Daily Reflection on Angel.


Friday January 18:

ON-SITE Day 3

10AM: Arrive at location. Work on project with on-site architects.

12PM: Lunch

1-5PM: Continue construction of on-site project.

5PM: Return to city

6PM: Dinner

8PM: Daily Reflection on Angel.

Saturday January 19:

ON-SITE Day 4

10AM: Arrive at location. Work on project with on-site architects.

12PM: Lunch

1-5PM: Continue construction of on-site project. Construction of walls, preparation of adobe.

5PM: Return to city

8PM: Daily Reflection

Sunday January 20:

ON-SITE Day 5

10AM: Arrive at location. Work on project with on-site architects.

12PM: Lunch

1-5PM: Continue construction of on-site project. Walls, adobe, plastering.

5PM: Return to city

6PM: Dinner

8PM: Daily Reflection

Week 3

Monday January 21:

ON-SITE Day 6

10AM: Arrive at location. Work on project with on-site architects.

12PM: Lunch

1-5PM: Continue construction of on-site project.

5PM: Return to city

6PM: Dinner

8PM: Daily Reflection

Tuesday January 22:

ON-SITE Day 7

10AM: Arrive at location. Work on project with on-site architects.

12PM: Lunch

1-5PM: Continue construction of on-site project.

5PM: Return to city. Update on progress of documentary film.

6PM: Dinner

8PM: Daily Reflection

Wednesday January 23:

ON-SITE Day 8

10AM: Arrive at location. Discuss Reading: Hunter, Chapter 5. Work on project with on-site architects.

12PM: Lunch

1-5PM: Preparation of roof structure.

5PM: Return to city

6PM: Dinner

8PM: Daily Reflection

Thursday January 24:

ON-SITE Day 9

10AM: Arrive at location. Work on project with on-site architects.

12PM: Lunch

1-5PM: Continue working on the roof

5PM: Return to city

6PM: Dinner

8PM: Daily Reflection

Friday January 25:

ON-SITE Day 10

10AM: Arrive at location. Work on project with on-site architects.

12PM: Lunch

1-5PM: Continue working on the roof

5PM: Return to city

6PM: Dinner

8PM: Daily Reflection

Saturday January 26:

FREE DAY

Sunday January 27:

6:30 p.m. Transportation to the airport

10:30 p.m. Flight leaves to the U.S.

Week 4

Monday January 28:

Arrive to the U.S.

Tuesday January 29:

ON-CAMPUS

10AM-12PM: Finalize any film editing needed.

1PM-3PM: Film finalizing continued.

Wednesday January 30:

ON-CAMPUS

10-12AM: Meet to discuss and launch our short film on YouTube.

1-3PM: Discuss our Learning Cluster Fair Presentation. (TBA)

End of Winter Block

*We will be filming throughout our Learning Cluster. The objective is to create a short film documentary (15-20 min) about our group and individual studies on Urban Development, Architecture, and Sustainable Housing in Buenos Aires, Argentina.

*In preparation for this Learning Cluster each student will choose individual topics to explore by themselves and in a team to prepare for a presentation.

Collaborating Institution

Techo: http://www.techo.org

As mentioned in the itinerary, this cluster will meet with representatives of this non-profit organization to discuss the implications of sustainable housing for impoverished communities. Students will conduct a short interview to gain clarity on urban development policies in inner-city neighborhoods where most Techo volunteers work to improve the quality of life for members of each area. This organization maintains an exceptional standard that coincides with the objectives of the course.

Below, is a statement from the non-profit Techo:

TECHO pursues three strategic objectives: (1) The promotion of community development in slums, through a process of community strengthening that promotes representative & validated leadership, drives the organization and participation of thousands of families living in slums to generate solutions of their own problems. (2) Fostering social awareness and action, with special emphasis on generating critical and determined volunteers working next to the families living in slums while involving different actors of society. (3) Political advocacy that promotes necessary structural changes to ensure that poverty does not continue reproducing, and that it begins to decrease rapidly.

Vision: A fair and poverty free society, where everyone has the opportunities needed to develop their capacities and fully exercise their rights

Mission: Work Tirelessly to overcome extreme poverty in slums, through training and joint action of families and youth volunteers. Furthermore, to promote community development, denouncing the situation in which the most excluded communities live. And lastly, to advocate for social policies with other actors in society.

Works Cited

Carns, Ted.Off on Our Own: Living Off-Grid in Comfortable Independence: One Couple’s“Learn as We Go” Journey to Self-Reliance. N.p.: St. Lynn’s, 2011. Print.

Fryer, Julie. The Complete Guide to Water Storage: How to Use Gray Water and Rainwater Systems, Rain Barrels, Tanks, and Other Water Storage Techniques for Household and Emergency Use (Back to Basics Conserving). N.p.: Atlantic, 2011. Print.

Hunter, Kaki, and Donald Kiffmeyer. Earthbag Building: The Tools, Tricks and Techniques (Natural Building Series). N.p.: New Society, 2004. Print.

Low, Setha M. Theorizing the City: The New Urban Anthropology Reader. N.p.: Rutgers UP, 1999. Print.

Ludwig, Art. Water Storage: Tanks, Cisterns, Aquifers, and Ponds for Domestic Supply, Fire and Emergency Use–Includes How to Make Ferrocement Water Tanks. N.p.: Oasis Design, 2005. Print.

Minke, Gernot. Building with Earth: Design and Technology of a Sustainable Architecture. 2nd ed. N.p.: Birkhäuser Architecture, 2009. Print.

Phillips, E. Barabara. City Lights: Urban-Suburban Life in the Global Society. N.p.: Oxford UP, 2009. Print.

Rock, David. Argentina, 1516-1987: From Spanish Colonization to Alfonsín. N.p.: University of California Press, 1987. Print.

Roy, Rob. Earth-Sheltered Houses: How to Build an Affordable Home. N.p.: New Society, 2006. Print.

Sanchez, Laura, and Alex Sanchez. Adobe Houses for Today: Flexible Plans for Your Adobe Home. N.p.: Sunstone, 2008. Print.

Schroder, Lisa, and Vince Ogletree. Adobe Homes for All Climates: Simple, Affordable, and Earthquake-Resistant Natural Building Techniques. N.p.: Chelsea Green, 2010. Print.

Sernau, Scott R. Social Inequality in a Global Age. Third ed. N.p.: Sage, 2010. Print.

Wilson, Jason. Buenos Aires: A Cultural History. N.p.: Interlink, 1999. Print.


Documentary films and instructional videos:


Earthship-Britanny Groundhouse
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=krWgtnJRAUg&feature=related

Garbage Warrior
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YrMJwIedrWU&feature=related

El barro, las manos, la casa
http://vimeo.com/41616082
http://ecocosas.com/documentales/el-barro-las-manos-la-casa-documental/

Other possible resources for student research

Earth architecturehttp://www.eartharchitecture.org

1. “Tips on Building an Adobe House” . This website has sections dedicated to different aspects of building an adobe home. One of the most helpful sections is titled “Adobe Bricks.” It has step by step instructions on how to make adobe bricks which essentially make up the structure. http://desertphile.org/adobe/adobe.htm

2. Adobe Houses for Today: Flexible Plans for Your Adobe Home book for purchase: $27 .This book was mentioned in an article titled “Top Six Adobe House Building Plans and Manuals.” It covers plans for building an adobe house including many photographs and diagrams.http://about.pricegrabber.com/search_getprod.php/masterid=950401135/search=Adobe%2BHouses%2Bfor%2BToday/rd_type=M

3. Adobe: Build it Yourself book for purchase: $29 This book was also mentioned in the article “Top Six Adobe House Building Plans and Manuals.” This one covers the building codes and energy requirements in building an adobe home.http://about.pricegrabber.com/search_getprod.php/masterid=950348502

4. “Adobe Building Systems” This website is titled “Adobe Building Systems.” On this particular link you will find what amounts to a power point on the basics of building an adobe home. http://www.adobebuilding.com/Education/green%20building.html

5. Sustainable Development in Argentinahttp://eau.sagepub.com/content/4/1/37.full.pdf+html
Sustainable development in Argentina analyzes why, despite having an impressive endowment of renewable and non-renewable resources, Argentina has failed to maintain its relative global position in economic, social and environmental development in recent decades. The authors summarize the main environmental problems in the country and conclude that the current trend is not unsustainable development but unsustainable underdevelopment, with increasing damage to natural resources and ecosystems and a growing incidence of poverty.

6. Sustainable building and community organization technologieshttp://search.proquest.com/docview/200023418/fulltextPDF?accountid=25347
Whilst much has changed in Argentina over the last four decades, housing remains a critical issue. Public housing schemes favor the construction of expensive homes that are accessible to few. There is an ever-growing need, therefore, to tackle the housing problem through a comprehensive approach that addresses housing, employment and local development. The Experimental Centre for Economic Housing/Association for Economic Housing (AVE/CEVE) is a non-governmental organization established over 40 years ago in the context of rapid urbanization. AVE/CEVE has worked to develop, apply and transfer a range of technical solutions to address various housing issues affecting low-income communities. Its approach encourages the active participation of residents throughout the process — both in projects for housing construction and in technology transfer processes. AVE/CEVE has developed a number of technologies and systems that seek to ensure the efficient use of energy and water resources, including a compact toilet and sink unit which results in water savings of 20%.

7. Buenos Aires: Global Dreams, Local Crises by David J. Keelinghttp://www.amazon.com/Buenos-Aires-Global-Dreams-Crises/dp/0471949353/ref=sr_1_7?ie=UTF8&qid=1349301672&sr=8-7&keywords=urban+development+argentina&tag=rnwff-20
Buenos Aires is a city of fascinating contrasts. The most southerly of the world’s great metropolises, it dominates the Argentine urban system, but is relatively isolated from the rest of Latin America and the global economic and political system. The archetypal elegance and sophistication of the Paris of the South is set against the problem of poor housing, social deprivation, and suburban sprawl. As Argentina struggles to maintain a democracy, the future stability of the region depends on how this vital, varied, and vulnerable city comes to terms with the need to restructure in the face of economic, environmental, and demographic crises. The book begins with an overview of the city’s four-hundred-year history, which forms the basis for an examination of the contemporary urban landscape. This leads to an analysis of local politics in relation to planning and housing policies that is followed by a consideration of changes in the city’s economic structures and an examination of Buenos Aires’ national, regional and global transport links. The book then turns to a detailed look at the city’s green spaces, environmental problems, and health care systems.

8. The Influence of the World Bank on National Housing and Urban Policies: The Case of Mexico and Argentina During the 1990s (Ashgate Economic Geography Series) by Cecilia Zanettahttp://www.amazon.com/Influence-World-National-Housing-Policies/dp/0754634914/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1349301672&sr=8-1&keywords=urban+development+argentina&tag=rnwff-20
Firmly grounded on her professional work, Dr. Zanetta’s academic research is aimed at building a bridge between practice and the world of ideas to ultimately improve living conditions in developing countries. During the past ten years, she has worked extensively on development projects in many Latin and Central American countries, including Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Ecuador, El Salvador, Honduras and Peru. Her main areas of interest include urban and housing policies, decentralization, public sector modernization and sub-national governments. Dr. Zanetta is an adjunct faculty member at the Department of Geography, University of Tennessee.

Tandil Curso 2013

Universidad Nacional del Centro de la Provincia de Buenos Aires

Facultad de Arte

Seminario de posgrado 

CINE, CRÍMENES DE LESA HUMANIDAD Y GENOCIDIO: Estrategias de documentación y representación

 Prof. Tomás Crowder-Taraborrelli*


Días y horarios: Miércoles 10, Jueves 11 y Viernes 12 de julio de 9 a 13 hs. y 15 a 19 hs.

Lugar: Sede de la Facultad de Arte (9 de julio 430, Tandil)

Se adjunta Programa.

*Tomás Crowder-Taraborrelli: Profesor de la Universidad Soka, California. Productor asociado de ITVS, la televisión pública norteamericana. Co-editor de la sección de cine de la revista Latin American Perspectives.

SEMINARIO NO ARANCELADO. CUPOS LIMITADOS. Inscripción previa: investigacion@arte.unicen.edu.ar

Organiza: Departamento de Historia y Teoría del Arte- Facultad de Arte UNICEN

Más información: Secretaría de Investigación y Posgrado, 9 de julio 430, Planta Alta, Tel (0054) – 249 – 440631 int. 210

investigacion@arte.unicen.edu.ar
http://www.arte.unicen.edu.ar

Con los estudiantes del seminario de posgrado