Introduction to Latin American Studies

INTS 130-01 (1608)
Tomás F. Crowder-Taraborrelli
Office hours: Maathai 414, Mondays 10:15 to 11:00 a.m
Class Time: Tuesdays and Thursdays 1:00 – 2:30 p.m.


It is a great pleasure and also a great challenge to teach a course like this. Since the Wars of Independence, Latin America has seen dramatic changes in its political and social identity. The last century has been marked by a never-ending series of coup d’états, often times sponsored by U.S. governments, which have undermined democratic governments and their policies. In spite of this, Latin America has shown resilience and continues to advance a progressive agenda that strives to do away with social inequality. In this course, we will examine the history of the region, paying particular attention to major political changes and their repercussion in popular culture. The course is organized chronologically, but we will always strive to assess how past events mobilize social forces in the present.


Books
Galeano, Eduardo. The Open Veins of Latin America.
New York: Monthly Review Press, 1997.
Chasteen, John Charles, Born in Blood and Fire: A
Concise History of Latin America, 2nd ed., N.Y.; London: W.W. Norton & Co., 2006.

Assignments
There are four types of assignments in this course: a group or individual presentation (based on the assigned discussion topic readings), a mid-term exam and a final argumentative research paper (8 – 10 pages).


Readings
I have organized course readings in two categories: common readings (CR) and assigned readings (AR). All students will have to read Common Readings and students assigned to a particular discussion topic will read CRs and also Discussion Topic Readings. Students are encouraged to read all readings, but I understand that it might not be possible. Since discussion is an essential part of each class, please complete all the readings before class and bring to class a few questions to generate dialogue. Always bring hard copies of the reading to class so you can cite passages and/or page numbers during discussion.


Tentative schedule of Readings and Assignments (Please check our Bright Space course site for more information about the readings)

Week 1
“The Conquest”

Thursday September 8th
Galeano, Eduardo. The Open Veins of Latin America. 1-58 (CR)
Fernandez Retamar, Roberto. “Caliban: A question”. The Oxford Book of Latin American Essays. (375- 378) (CR)

Week 2
Tuesday September 13th
Cabeza de Vaca. Naufragios [selections] (CR)
Moreno Fraginals, M. “The Death of the Forest” (AR)
Chasteen, J. Born in Blood and Fire, Chapter 1 (CR)
Las Casas, Bartolome. In Defense of the Indians. (Selections)
Rodriguez, Silvio. “La maza”. Song [COURSE WEBSITE, April 24, 2018]

Thursday September 15th
Galeano, E. TOVOLA 59-113 (CR)
FILM: La hora de los hornos, dir. Grupo Cine Liberación [first part screened in class] [COURSE WEBSITE, April 23, 2018]

Week 3
The Conquest and Colonialism

TUESDAY September 20th
Galeano, Eduardo. The Open Veins of Latin America. 59-133 (CR)
Mills, Keneth and William B. Taylor. Colonial Spanish America: Chapters 6, 12,15.
FILM: La tierra quema, Dir. Raymundo Gleyzer [COURSE WEBSITE, April 22, 2018]

THURSDAY September 22nd
Chasteen, John Charles. Born in Blood and Fire. Chapter 1 (25-57) (AR)
Manzano, Juan Francisco. “Autobiography of a slave” The Cuba Reader (49-57) (AR)
Cuban Music: “Santa Barbara, Que viva Chango”, Conjunto Folklorico Nacional de Cuba. [COURSE WEBSITE, April 21, 2018]
Film: Inner Borderlines: Visions of America Through The Eyes of Alejandro Morales, 7 p.m. Pauling 216

Week 4

Independence 

TUESDAY September 27th
Galeano, Eduardo. The Open Veins of Latin America. 113-133 (CR)
Marti, Jose. “Our America” and other selected essays. (CR)
Introd. to Sarmiento’s Life in the Argentine Republic in the Days of the Tyrants(CR)
Chasteen, John Charles. Born in Blood and Fire. Chapter 3, 91-112 (AR)

THURSDAY September 29th
Galeano, Eduardo. The Open Veins of Latin America. 134-170 (CR)
Ortiz, Fernando. “Tobacco and Sugar”. The Oxford Book of Latin American Essays. 
(70-74)
Ortiz, Fernando. “Transculturation”. The Cuba Reader.
Moore, Robin. “Afrocubanismo and Son” (192-200)
Sublette, Ned. Cuba and Its Music. (Available in the library as an electronic text) Recommended reading.
Parra, Violeta. “Easy for singing”, “Dumb, Sad and Thoughtful” (AR)
FILM: Violeta se fue a los cielos, dir. Andres Wood (Chile, 2011) [selection] [COURSE WEBSITE, April 20, 2018]

Week 5

Revolution

TUESDAY October 4th
Skidmore, Thomas E., Peter H. Smith & James N. Green. “Mexico: The Taming of a Revolution”. Modern Latin America. (47-78)
Florescano, Enrique. “The Colonial Latifundio” (CR)


THURSDAY, October 6th
The Mexican Revolution. Selection of readings (Angel): Flores Magon, “Land and Liberty”, Zapata and others, “Plan of Ayala”, Cabrera, “The Restoration of the Ejido” (CR)
Mexico at the Hour of Combat: Sabino Osuna’s Photographs of the Mexican Revolution (in class writing workshop)
Sosa, Mercedes, “Gracias a la Vida” [COURSE WEBSITE, April 19, 2018]
Yupanqui, Atahualpa. “El Arriero”, Divididos “El Arriero” [COURSE WEBSITE, April 19, 2018]

Week 6

Modernity

TUESDAY October 11th
Skidmore, Thomas E., Peter H. Smith & James N. Green. “Brazil: The Awakening Giant”. (296- 340) CR 
de Andrade, Oswald. “Anthropophagite Manifesto”. The Oxford Book of Latin American Essays. (96-99) (CR)

THURSDAY October 13th
Lispector, Clarice. “Creating Brasilia”. The Oxford Book of Latin American Essays. (331- 334). AR
Buarque, Chico. Construcao. Songs by Caetano Veloso, Jorge Bem [Played and discussed in class, see COURSE WEBSITE, April 18, 2018, for lyrics and music]
Short documentary on Brasilia [sequence screened in class] Brasilia, contradicoes de uma Cidade Nova
dir. Joaquim Pedro, 1967.

Week 7
Tuesday October 18th
FILM Screening: Title to be announced

Thursday October 20th
Readings to be announced

Week 8
Tuesday, October 25th
MIDTERM

Thursday October 27th
Galeano, Eduardo. The Open Veins of Latin America. Chapter 5. 205- 261 (CR)

Research paper topic due!

Week 9
Tuesday, November 1st
Guevara, Che. “Man and Socialism”. (370-374) Cuban Reader (CR)
Chapter X, Social Revolution. Problems in Modern Latin America (CR)
Alvarez, Santiago. Now [short film screened in class] [COURSE WEBSITE April 17, 2018]

Thursday, November 3rd
Espinosa, Julio Garcia Espinosa. “For an Imperfect Cinema”. The Cuba Reader.
Desnoes, Edmundo. “Inconsolable Memories: A Cuban View of the Missile Crises”.
Schwartz, Rosalie . “The Invasion of the tourist”. (244-252)
Class discussion of final research papers

Week 10
Alternative Forms of Government


Tuesday November 8th
Sitrin, Marina. Everyday Revolutions…Chapter 3, “Horizontalidad” (CR)
Zibechi, Raul. Territories in Resistance. Chapter 16 “The Art of Governing Movements” (CR)

Thursday November 10th

Campo, Javier and Tomás Crowder-Taraborrelli. Introduction: Media and Democratization. Unpublished Introduction of a Special Issue of Latin American Perspectives.


Week 11
State Terrorism

Tuesday November 15th
Arditti, Rita. Searching for Life: The Grandmothers of the Plaza de Mayo and the Disappeared
Children of Argentina
50-78 (CR)
Dinges, John. The Condor Years: How Pinochet and His Allies Brought Terrorism to Three Continents. 99-125 (CR)
FILM: La batalla de Chile, Dir. Patricio Guzmán [selection] [COURSE WEBSITE, April 16, 2018]

Thursday, November 17th.
Walsh, Roberto. “Carta a la Junta”.
Davis, Jeffrey. “Moving the Process and Proving The Truth”. Seeking Human Rights Justice in Latin America.
FILM: Fernando Ha Vuelto. Dir. Silvio Caiozzi. [COURSE WEBSITE, April 15, 2018]

Week 12
Religion and Liberation


Tuesday November 22nd
Gutiérrez, Gustavo. A Theology of Liberation, “Theology and Liberation” (CR).
Carroll, James. “Who am I to judge…” New Yorker Magazine(“
NewYorkerPopeArticle” on Bright Space)

Thursday November 24th
Reading TBA.


Week 13
Narcoscapes and Narcoculture

Tuesday November 29th
Cabanas, Miguel A. Narcoculture and the Politics of Representation (CR)
FILM: Narco Cultura, dir. Shaul Shwarz (on Netflix, streaming)


Thursday December 1st
Eisenhammer, Stephen. “Bare Life in Ciudad Juarez: Violence in a Space of Exclusion” (AR)
FILM: Señorita Extraviada (selection). [COURSE WEBSITE April 14, 2018]


Week 14
Water Wars


Tuesday December 6th
Dangl, Benjamin. The Price of Fire: Resource Wars and Social Movements in Bolivia. Chapters 3 and 4 CR)
FILMS: The Corporation and Even the Rain [selections]. [COURSE WEBSITE April 13, 2018]

Thursday December 8th
Oral presentations

15th Week
Tuesday December 13th
Study Day

Thursday December 15th
Oral presentations if needed
Final Research paper due


Bibliography

Ahrens, Jan Martínez. “El peso mexicano sufre la peor caída del planeta por el efecto Trump.” El País, 11 Nov. 2016, elpais.com/economia/2016/11/11/actualidad/1478881241_290530.html.

Benjamin, Jules R. The United States and the Origins of the Cuban Revolution. Princeton University Press, 1992. Print.

Burton, J. “The cameras as ‘gun’: Two decades of culture and resistance in Latin America.” Latin American Perspectives, 1978. Print.

Bolivia (Plurinational State of)’s Constitution of 2009. Oxford University Press, Inc., constituteproject.org.

Cabeza De Vaca, Naufragios de Alvar Nunez Cabeza de Vaca. University of California Press, 1993. Print.

Centenera, Mar. “Historias trágicas detrás del ‘miércoles negro’ en Argentina.” El País , 19 Oct. 2016, http://elpais.com/internacional/2016/10/19/argentina/1476877699_409150.html.

Chasteen, John Charles. Born in Blood & Fire: A Concise History of Latin America. W. W. Norton & Company, 2011. Print.

Cleary, Edward L. “Beginning of the Human Rights Era: Military Repression.” The Struggle for Human Rights in Latin America. Praeger, 1997. Print.

Collyns, Dan. “Women in Peru protest against rising tide of murder and sexual crime.” The Guardian, http://www.theguardian.com/global-development/2016/aug/13/women-peru-protest-rising-tide-murder-sexual-crime.

Corrales, Javier. “Six Reasons Why Argentina Legalized Gay Marriage First.” Americas Quarterly, 30 July 2010. web.

Dangl, Benjamin. The Price of Fire: Resources, War, and Social Movements in Bolivia. AK Press, 2007.

Dinges, John. “The Condor system.” The Condor Years: How Pinochet and His Allies Brought Terrorism To Three Continents. The New Press, 2005. pp. 99-125. Print.

Eisenhammer, Stephen. “Bare Life in Ciudad Juárez: Violence in a Space of Exclusion.” Latin American Perspectives, 30 Oct. 2013.

Ellner, Steve. “Social and Political Diversity and the Democratic Road to Change in Venezuela.” Latin American Perspectives, vol. 40, no. 190, ser. 3, May 2013, pp. 63–82.

Equiano, Olaudah. The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano, or Gustavus Vassa, the African. Written by Himself. CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform, 2014.

Fernandez Retamar, Roberto. “Caliban: A question”. The Oxford Book of Latin American Essays. 375- 378. Print.

Finnegan, William. “Venezuela, a failing state.” The New Yorker, 14 Nov. 2016.

Fletcher, Bill, and Peter Kornbluh. “Independence Movements Under Fidel Castro.” Democracy Now, 28 Nov. 2016.

Florescano, Enrique. “The Colonial Latifundio,” The Mexico Reader: History, Culture, and Politics. Joseph, Gilbert M., and Timothy J. Henderson, editors. Duke University Press Books, 2003. Print.

Galeano, Eduardo. The Open Veins of Latin America. Monthly Review Press, 1997. 1-58.

Gallegos, Zorayda. “Hallados 4.600 fragmentos óseos en un campo de exterminio de Los Zetas.” El País , 1 Nov. 2016, http://elpais.com/internacional/2016/10/19/mexico/1476831467_522360.html.


Greenwald, Glenn, et al, editors. “Brazil Is Engulfed by Ruling Class Corruption — and a Dangerous Subversion of Democracy.” The Intercept_, 18 Mar. 2016, theintercept.com/2016/03/18/brazil-is-engulfed-by-ruling-class-corruption-and-a-dangerous-subversion-of-democracy/.

Guevara, Che. “Message to the Tricontinental.” Che Guevara Internet Archive, 1967, http://www.marxists.org/archive/guevara/1967/04/16.htm.

Gutierrez, Gustavo. ”Theology: a critical reflection.” A Theology of Liberation: History, Politics, and Salvation. Orbis Books, 1988. pp. 2-25. Print.

Holpuch, Amanda. “Immigrants fear Trump deportations: ‘This election changed my optimism’.” The Guardian, 11 Nov. 2016, http://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2016/nov/11/donald-trump-immigration-policy-deportations-build-wall.

Joyce, Christopher, and Eric Stover. “A Southern Exposure.” Witnesses from the Grave. Little Brown & Co (T), 1991. pp. 205-304. Print.

Klein, Naomi. “It was the Democrats’ embrace of neoliberalism that won it for Trump.” The Guardian, 9 Nov. 2016.

Kolko, G. Confronting The Third World: United States Foreign Policy 1945-1980. Pantheon, 1988. Print.

Lefeber, Walter. “The Collapse of The System.” Inevitable Revolutions: The United States in Central America. W. W. Norton & Company, 1993. pp. 197-270. Print.

Langlois, Jessica. “How the Chicanas of Eastside Mujeres Network Are Fighting to End Violence Against Women.” LA Weekly, 21 Sept. 2016, http://www.laweekly.com/news/how-the-chicanas-of-eastside-mujeres-network-are-fighting-to-end-violence-against-women-7408606.

Marti, Jose. Obras Completas: Edición Critica. Paperback. 2002. Print.

Menchu, Rigoberta. “Rigoberta Menchu.” The Oxford of Latin American Essays. Oxford University Press, 1997. pp. 490-494. Print.

Minic, Cristóbal Alvarado. “Venezuela Expert Miguel Tinker Salas Breaks Down Nation’s Crisis.” Pomona College, 27 June 2016, http://www.pomona.edu/news/2016/06/27-venezuela-expert-miguel-tinker-salas-breaks-down-nation%E2%80%99s-crisis.

Moreno Fraginals, M. “The Death of the Forest.” The Cuba Reader: History, Culture, Politics. Eds. Chomsky, A., et al., editors. The Duke Press, 2009. Print.

Neruda, Pablo. Neruda: Selected Poems. Houghton Mifflin, 1990. Print.

Ocaño, Manuel . “Culpa organización a EU de crear un caos de refugiados en la frontera mexicana.” El Latino San Diego , 27 Oct. 2016.

Piketty, Thomas. “We must rethink globalization, or Trumpism will prevail.” The Guardian, 16 Nov. 2016, http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2016/nov/16/globalization-trump-inequality-thomas-piketty.

Schlesinger, S., et al, editors. The Story of the American Coup in Guatemala. David Rockefeller Center for Latin American Studies, 2005. Print.

Semanal, Bitacora . “La Jornada Mexico. Violencia contra mujeres.” La Jornada en linea.

Skidmore, Thomas E., et al.,. Modern Latin America. “Mexico: The Taming of a Revolution.” Oxford University Press, 2013. Print.

Sitrin, Marina A. “Horizontalidad.” Everyday Revolutions: Horizontalism and Autonomy in Argentina. Zed Books, 1988. pp. 61-100. Print.

The Associated Press in Rio de Janeiro. “ Brazil police use pepper spray at austerity protest outside Rio parliament.” The Guardian, 16 Nov. 2016, http://www.theguardian.com/world/2016/nov/16/brazil-rio-de-janeiro-police-pepper-spray-protest-olympics.

Vicuna, Cecilia, and Ernesto Livon-Grosman. The Oxford Book of Latin American Poetry. Oxford University Press, 2009. Print.

West, Cornel. “Goodbye, American neoliberalism. A new era is here.” The Guardian, 17 Nov. 2016, http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2016/nov/17/american-neoliberalism-cornel-west-2016-election.

William B, Taylor, and Kenneth Mills, editors. Colonial Spanish America: A Documentary History. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 1998. Print.
Wilson, Diana Tamar. “Violence Against Women in Latin America.” Latin American Perspectives, vol. 41, no. 194, ser. 1, 16 Dec. 2014.

Introduction to the Pacific Basin

SPRING 2018
Tomás Crowder-Taraborrelli
Office hours: Mondays 11:00- 12:00 p.m. Maathai 414


Introduction to the Pacific Basin

The prospect of exploring the history of the relationship between two areas of the world narrowly defined as the Pacific Rim and Latin America poses an interesting set of challenges. Both areas host hundreds of communities that have had very complicated histories with respect to their national governments and other nations. In this course, the main goal will be to determine some of the most common cultural traits and socio-historical events that shape the discourse of identity in these enormously rich geographical and cultural areas. In outlining a narrative history to our enterprise of inquiry, I have selected readings and films that, for the most part, have to do with violent episodes in the histories of both of these regions. There are several reasons why I have chosen this approach: one, is because I believe that violent periods expose the social and political frictions that, for one reason or another, have been repressed; secondly, the reasons why these violent periods erupted are oftentimes still very controversial (theories about their origins capture the interest of many scholars and artists around the world today); and third, studying the causes of violent periods can often lead to an understanding of efforts to establish peace and justice in the affected communities. This is an interdisciplinary course, and I hope students will be able to engage critically with the materials and explore their disciplinary interests with passion and respect for the diverse views presented in the articles, books, and films that are part of the curriculum.


Goals and Objectives

Some of the goals of this course are: 1) to foster a critical understanding of human rights in the Pacific Basin 2) to determine what organizations and single individuals have done to promote social justice and peace in their communities, and 3) to evaluate the contribution that artists and intellectuals have made to the ways that communities “imagine themselves.” Students will be asked to take copious notes during class discussions and as they complete their readings, and to carry out research for their final essay.

Assignments

Paper #1 15% (3 pages)

Paper #2 15% (4 pages)

Paper #3 20% (6 pages)

4 Short response papers 20% (1-2 pages each)

Oral Presentations 10%

Participation 20%


Readings

Complete common readings and any additional readings assigned specifically to you. Take notes. Come to class prepared to raise challenging questions about the readings. Question the interpretative authority of the authors and also of your classmates and professor.

Abbreviations

CR Common Readings- Every student needs to do the reading and prepare for class discussion

AR Assigned Reading to 1 student: The student who is assigned the reading must prepare a 10-minute presentation on the reading and prepare to engage with other readings or films scheduled for that day.

Written Work

Please type all written work using a standard 12-point font, double-space the text, leave a one-inch margin on all sides and staple multiple pages. Don’t forget to put your name and course number on the paper. Late papers will be marked down 1/3 grade for each day late.

Please follow the APA Style format for citations and general style formatting. You can find an online version of the APA style manual at: http://owl.english.purdue.edu 

Schedule of readings

For the most updated schedule of reading please visit the course’s wiki (on brightspace) 

Required Text

Otsuka, Julie. The Buddha in the Attic. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 2011

COURSE WEBSITE

http://pacificbasincrowder.blogspot.com/

COURSE SCHEDULE 

Week 1: Introduction to the course

TUESDAY, February 6:
Barter, Shane J., and Michael Weiner. “An Introduction to the Pacific Basin.” The Pacific Basin: An Introduction.(CR) 9 pgs.

Wallerstein, Immanuel. “Culture as the Ideological Battleground of the Modern World System”. (CR) 25 pgs.

The Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

http://www.un.org/en/universal-declaration-human-rights/

FILM: Manufactured Landscapes, Dir. Edward Burtynsky [sequence screened in class]

THURSDAY, February 8:
Byung-Chul Han. “Healing as Killing.” Psycho-Politics. (AR) 4 pgs.

Jenkins, Rhys. “China’s Global Expansion and Latin America”. (CR) 29 pgs.

Organization of groups: 1) Human Rights 2) War and International Law 3) Culture and the representation of identity 4) History and memory

Why China matters

TUESDAY, February 13:

Loyalka, Michelle Dammon. “Introduction.” Eating Bitterness: Stories from the Front Lines of China’s Great Urban Migration. (AR) 8 pgs.

Loyalka, Michelle Dammon. “The Teenage Beauty Queens.”Eating Bitterness: Stories from the Front Lines of China’s Great Urban Migration. (CR) 33 pgs.

FILM: Last Train Home, Dir. Lixin Fan (First Part)


THURSDAY, February 15:

Benjamin, Walter. “Imperial Panorama,” “The Telephone.” Berlin Childhood around 1900. (AR) 6 pgs.

Weiner, Michael. “East Asia: Convergence and Divergence.” The Pacific Basin: An Introduction.(CR) 11 pgs.

FILM: Last Train Home, Dir. Lixin Fan (Second Part)


The Colonial Years in Latin America (Immigration, Slavery and Race Relations) 


TUESDAY, February 20:
England, Sarah and Ian Read. “Latin America: A living and changing artifact.”

The Pacific Basin: An Introduction.(AR) 13 pgs.

Hu-DeHart, Evelyn. “Race Construction and Race Relations. Chinese and Blacks in Nineteenth-Century Cuba”. Encounters: People of Asian Descent in the Americas. 8 pgs. (CR)

THURSDAY, February 22:
Skidmore, Thomas E., Aline Helg and Alan Knight. “Introduction.” The Idea of Race in Latin America, 1870-1940. (AR) 4 pgs.

Dulitzky, Ariel E. “A Region in Denial: Racial Discrimination and Racism in Latin America.” Neither Enemies Nor Friends: Latinos, Blacks, Afro- Latinos. (CR) 15 pgs.


The Latin American human rights legacy


TUESDAY, February 27:

Las Casas, Bartolome. In Defense of the Indians [Selections] (CR) 3 pgs.

Mignolo, Walter D. “Racism As We Sense It Today.” The Modern Language Association of America. (AR) 5 pgs.

Barter, Shane. “The Age of Colonialism (s).” The Pacific Basin: An
Introduction. (AR) 10 pgs.

THURSDAY, March 1:
Carozza, Paolo G. “From Conquest to Constitutions: Retrieving a Latin American Tradition of the Idea of Human Rights.” (CR) 33 pgs.

Start reading Julie Otsuka’s The Buddha in the Attic.

FIRST SHORT RESPONSE DUE ON Sunday March 4 by 6 p.m.!

Japanese Immigration to the United States

TUESDAY, March 6:
England, Sarah and Michael Weiner. “Migration, immigration, and settlement within the Pacific Basin.” The Pacific Basin: An Introduction. (AR) 10 pgs.

Sunada Sarasohn, Eileen . “On Being Japanese in America.” The Issei: Portrait of a Pioneer: An Oral History. (AR) 6 pgs.

Otsuka, Julie. The Buddha in the Attic. 1- 60 pgs. (CR)


THURSDAY, March 8:

O’Brien, David J. and Stephen S. Fugita. “The Concentration Camp Experience.” The Japanese American Experience. (AR) 13 pgs.

Otsuka, Julie. The Buddha in the Attic (finish de novel) (CR)

Community Cinema Screening: Dolores – March 8th (Thursday), 7-9 p.m., PAU 216

With intimate and unprecedented access, Peter Bratt’s Dolores tells the story of Dolores Huerta, among the most important, yet least-known, activists in American history. Co-founder of the first farmworkers union with Cesar Chavez, she tirelessly led the fight for racial and labor justice, becoming one of the most defiant feminists of the 20th century.

http://www.soka.edu/news_events/calendar-of events.aspx?trumbaEmbed=view%3Devent%26eventid%3D126271087


Active Citizenship


TUESDAY, March 13:

Loewen, James W. “The Vietnam War in High School American History”. Censoring History: Citizenship and Memory in Japan, Germany, and the United States. (CR) 22 pgs.

Luther King, Martin. “Nonviolence: The Only Road to Freedom.” (AR) 6 pgs.
https://pacificbasincrowder.blogspot.com/search?updated-max=2015-03-25T15:27:00-07:00&max-results=7

FILM: The Trials of Muhammad Ali (sequence screened in class)


THURSDAY, March 15:

Malcom X, “After the Bombing/Speech at Ford Auditorium.” (CR) 14 pgs. Audio on Youtube (follow this link).
https://pacificbasincrowder.blogspot.com/search?updated-max=2015-03-25T15:27:00-07:00&max-results=7

Marable, Manning. “They Don’t Come Like the Minister.” Malcom X: A Life of Reinvention. (AR) 30 pgs.

MUSIC: Grandmaster Flash and the Furious Five. “The Message.” [in class]

The Economist. “Rappers’ knuckles rapped: A genre’s popularity worries officials.” (AR)
https://www.economist.com/news/china/21735605-criticised-his-coarse-lyrics-rapper-china-blames-influence-black-music-why-hip-hop

First Paper due March 27 by 6 p.m.



SPRING BREAK 3/19-3/23 J J


Human Rights Violations in the Southern Cone

TUESDAY, March 27:
Roniger, Luis and Mario Sznajder. The Legacy of Human-Right Violations in the Southern Cone: Argentina, Chile, and Uruguay. “Preface” and “Introduction.” (CR) 9 pgs.

Roht-Arriaza, Naomi. “The Actors Behind the Pinochet Cases.” The Pinochet Effect: Transnational Justice in the Age of Human Rights. (AR) 17 pgs.

FILM: The Pinochet Case (sequence screened in class)


THURSDAY, March 29:

Roniger, Luis and Mario Sznajder. Chapter 1 The Legacy of Human-Right Violations in the Southern Cone: Argentina, Chile, and Uruguay.(CR) 38 pgs.

FILM: The Pinochet Case (sequence screened in class)


Remembering and forgetting

TUESDAY, April 3:
Sturken, Marita. “Absent Images of Memory: Remembering and Reenacting the Japanese Internment”. Perilous Memories: The asia-Pacific War(s). (CR) 16 pgs.

FILM: History and Memory, dir. Rea Tajiri. (screened in class)

THURSDAY, April 5:
Lee, Erika. “The Chinese Are Coming. How Can We Stop Them.” At America’s Gates: Chinese Immigration During The Exclusion Era, 1882-1943. (CR) 22 pages.

Lee, Erika. “The Keepers of the Gate: U.S. Immigration Officials and Chinese Exclusion.” At America’s Gates: Chinese Immigration During The Exclusion Era, 1882-1943. (AR) 28 pages.

Jelin, Elizabeth. “The Minefields of Memory.” (AR) 3 pgs.

Soka Community Cinema: Look and See: Wendell Berry’s Kentucky, Pauling 216, 7 p.m.

Look & See revolves around the divergent stories of several residents of Henry County, Kentucky who each face difficult choices that will dramatically reshape their relationship with the land and their community. Filmed across four seasons in the farming cycle, it blends observational scenes of farming life, interviews with farmers and community members with evocative, carefully framed shots of the surrounding landscape. Thus, in the spirit of Berry’s agrarian philosophy, Henry County itself will emerge as a character in the film – a place and a landscape that is deeply interdependent with the people that inhabit it.


Trauma, families and national histories

TUESDAY, April 10:
Barter, Shane J. “Armed conflict across the Pacific: Patterns and
possibilities.” The Pacific Basin: An Introduction. (AR) 9 pages.

G. B. Tran’s Vietnamerica: A family’s journey. First Part. (CR) 117 pgs.(Graphic Novel)

SECOND SHORT RESPONSE DUE ON ANGEL, April 10th, at 6 p.m.

THURSDAY, April 12:
Singer, Marc. “Time and Narrative: Unity and Discontinuity in The
Invisibles.” Critical Approaches to Comics: Theories and Methods. 14
pgs. (AR)

Tran, G. B. Vietnamerica: A family’s journey. Second part (CR)last 200 pgs.

Identity, ethnicity, national identity and genocide

TUESDAY, April 17:

“The civil rights issue of our time’: how Dreamers came to dominate US politics.” The Guardian, January, 2018. (AR) 4 pages.
https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2018/jan/27/the-civil-rights-issue-of-our-time-how-dreamers-came-to-dominate-us-politics

De León, Jason. “Prevention Through Deterrence.” The Land of Open Graves: Living and Dying On The Migrant Trail (CR) 37 pages.

THURSDAY, April 19:
Stillman, Sarah. “When Deportation is a Death Sentence.” The New Yorker, February, 2018. (CR) 13 pgs.
https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2018/01/15/when-deportation-is-a-death-sentence

Organize groups for presentations.

Second Paper due April 22 by 6 p.m.

The Pacific War

TUESDAY, April 24:

Dower, John W. ” ‘An aptitude for being unloved’ “: war and memory in Japan”. Ways of Forgetting, Ways of Remembering: Japan in the Modern World. (CR) 31 pgs.


THURSDAY, April 26:

Renov, Michael. “Warring Images: Stereotype and American Representations of the Japanese, 1941-1991”. (CR) 26 pgs.

THIRD SHORT RESPONSE DUE APRIL 30 by 6 p.m.


The Pacific War (continue)


TUESDAY, May 31:

Dower, John W. War Without Mercy: Race & Power in the Pacific War [Chapter selections for student presentations]. 

THURSDAY, May 3:
Dower, John W. War Without Mercy: Race & Power in the Pacific War [Chapter selections for student presentations].

STUDENT PRESENTATIONS

Soka Community Cinema Presents: Iris, Pauling 216, 7 p.m.

Iris pairs the late documentarian Albert Maysles (Grey Gardens, Gimme Shelter), then 87, with Iris Apfel, the quick-witted, flamboyantly dressed 93-year-old style maven who has had an outsized presence on the New York fashion scene for decades. More than a fashion film, the documentary is a story about creativity and how a soaring free spirit continues to inspire. Iris portrays a singular woman whose enthusiasm for fashion, art and people are her sustenance. She reminds us that dressing — and indeed, life — is nothing but a grand experiment. “If you’re lucky enough to do something you love, everything else follows.”

The Pacific War:The Lessons of War (cont.) 

TUESDAY, May 8:
STUDENT PRESENTATIONS (if need)

THURSDAY, May 10 (last class):
STUDENT PRESENTATIONS (if needed)

FOURTH RESPONSE DUE SUNDAY MAY 15 by 6 pm!!!



May 16 to 22: Final’s week

Third Paper due March 20, by 6 p.m. 


Bibliography

Barter, Shane J., and Michael Weiner. “An Introduction to the Pacific Basin.” The Pacific Basin: An Introduction, edited by Shane Barter and Michael Weiner, Routledge, 2017.

Benjamin, Walter. Berlin Childhood around 1900. Harvard University Press, 2006.

Carozza, Paolo G., “From Conquest to Constitutions: Retrieving a Latin American Tradition of the Idea of Human Rights” (2003). Scholarly Works. Paper 581.

De León, Jason. “Prevention Through Deterrence.” The Land of Open Graves: Living and Dying On The Migrant Trail. University of California Press, 2015, pp. 23-37.

Dower, John W. ” ‘An aptitude for being unloved’ “: war and memory in Japan”. Ways of Forgetting, Ways of Remembering: Japan in the Modern World. The New Press, 2014.

Dower, John W. War Without Mercy: Race & Power in the Pacific War. Pantheon, 1987.

Dultizky, Ariel E. “A Region in Denial: Racial Discrimination and Racism in Latin America.” Neither Enemies Nor Friends: Latinos, Blacks, Afro-Latinos,” edited by Anani Dzidzienyo and Suzanne Oboler, Palgrave Macmillian, 2005, pp. 39-58.

Gambino, Lauren. “The civil rights issue of our time: how Dreamers came to dominate US politics.” The Guardian. 27 January 2018.

Han, Byung-Chul. “Healing as Killing.” Psychopolitics: Neoliberalism and New Technologies of Power. Verso, 2017, pp. 29-32.

Hu-DeHart, Evelyn. “Race Construction and Race Relations. Chinese and Blacks in Nineteenth-Century Cuba.” Encounters: People of Asian Descent in the Americas. Ed. Rustomiji-Kerns, Rajini Skrikanth and Leny Mendoza Strobel. Lanham: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 1999.

Jelin, Elizabeth. “The Minefields of Memory.” NACLA.

Jenkins, Rhys. “China’s global expansion and latin america.” Journal of Latin American Studies , vol. 42, no. 4, Nov. 2010, pp. 809–837.

Las Casas, Bartolomé, and Stafford Poole. In defense of the Indians. Northern Illinois University Press, 1992.

Lee, Erika. “The Chinese Are Coming. How Can We Stop Them.” At America’s Gates: Chinese Immigration During The Exclusion Era, 1882-1943.” University of North Carolina Press, 2003, pp. 23-73.

Loewen, James W. “The Vietnam War in High School American History”. Censoring History: Citizenship and Memory in Japan, Germany, and the United States. Hein, Laura and Mark Selden. Armonk: M.E. Sharpe, 2000.

Loyalka, Michelle Dammon. Eating bitterness: stories from the front lines of Chinas great urban migration. University of California Press, 2012.

Malcom X. “After the Bombing/ Speech at Ford Auditorium.” YouTube.

Marable, Manning. “They Don’t Come Like the Minister.” Malcom X: A Life of Reinvention.

Martin Luther King, Jr. “Nonviolence: The Only Road to Freedom.” Teaching American History, teachingamericanhistory.org/library/document/nonviolence-the-only-road-to-freedom/.

Mignolo, Walter D. “Racism As We Sense It Today.” The Modern Language Association of America.

O’Brien, David J. and Stephen S. Fugita. “The Concentration Camp Experience.” The Japanese American Experience.

Otsuka, Julie. Buddha in the Attic . Anchor, 2012.

Renov, Michael. “Warring Images: Stereotype and American Representations of the Japanese, 1941-1991.” The Culture of Japan as Seen Through Its Leisure. Ed. Linhart,S., and Sabine Frühstück. State University of New York Press, 1998.

Roniger, Luis and Mario Sznajder. The Legacy of Human-Right Violations in the Southern Cone: Argentina, Chile, and Uruguay. Oxford University Press, 1999.

Roht-Arriaza, Naomi, “The Actors Behind Pinochet Cases.” The Pinochet Effect: Transnational Justice in the Age of Human Rights.” University of Pennsylvania Press, 2005, pp. 208-237.

Sarasohn, Eileen Sunada. The Issei, portrait of a pioneer: an oral history. Pacific Books, 1990.

Skidmore, Thomas E., Aline Helg and Alan Knight. The Idea of Race in Latin America, 1870-1940. Austin: University of Texas Press, 1990.

Stillman, Sarah. “When Deportation is Death Sentence.” The New Yorker, February 2018.

Sturken, Marita. “Absent Images of Memory: Remembering and Reenacting the Japanese Internment”. Perilous Memories: The asia-Pacific War(s). Ed. Fujitani, T., Geofrey M. White, and Lisa Yoneyame,. Durham: Duke University Press, 2001.

The Economist. “Rappers’ knuckles rapped: A genre’s popularity worries officials.” 25 January 2018.

Tran, GB. Vietnamerica: A Family’s Journey. Villard, 2013.

UN General Assembly. (1948). “Universal declaration of human rights” (217 [III] A). Paris. Retrieved from http://www.un.org/en/universal-declaration-human-rights/

Wallerstein, Immanuel. “Culture as the Ideological Battleground of the Modern World-system.” The Essential Wallerstein. New York: New Press, 2000.

Capitalism & Globalization

Proposal for Independent Study
Professor Tomás Crowder-Taraborrelli


Capitalism and Globalization


This course explores philosophical traditions that seek to explain the relationship between commerce and ethics. Economic theories often deal with the political organization of society, the distribution of wealth, and the rights of all individuals to lead a healthy and happy life. Thus, in most cases, economists and philosophers are both concerned with the welfare of their communities, and the strengths of judicial institutions that guarantee a certain living standard.

The goals of this course are to provide an introduction to the most important literature of political economy, including major thinkers such as Marx, Engels, Ricardo, Proudhon, and Keynes. We will explore the contributions of a few of the most important economic theories to current debates around the expansion of capitalism and the global economy. We will survey major ideas and arguments to try to envision how the current organization of financial markets leads to increasing inequality around the globe. By the end of the semester, the student should be able to identify the underlying arguments used by major economic theorists to support models of development that are more ethical and equitable. This is a 2-unit course.

Assignments

30 % Class participation
30 % Midterm essay (4-6 pages double spaced) due March 13th
40 % Final essay (8-10 pages double spaced) due May 9th Class

Meetings
Day: Monday
Time: 13:00-15:00

Schedule of readings

February 8 
Introduction to the course

February 15
Hume, David. An Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding (Chap. I-IV, VIII, XI, XII)

February 22
Rousseau, Jean-Jacques. The Social Contract (Book I & II)

February 29
Engels, Friedrich. The Origin of the family, private property, and the state (Chap. II & IX)

March 7
Proudhon, Pierre-Joseph. What Is Property? (Chap. II.1, II.2, III.1-III.5, IV.1-IV.6, IV.10)

March 14
Marx, Karl. Capital: A Critique of Political Economy (Chap. I.1-I.3,)

March 21 
Marx, Karl. Capital: A Critique of Political Economy (Chap. XVI, XXIII, XXIV)

March 28 
Shatz, Marshall, ed. Bakunin: Statism and Anarchy (Chap. I, II, V – and selection of VI & VII)


April 4 

Keynes, John M. The general theory of employment, interest, and money (Chap. I, II, VI, XII-XIV, XVII, XXIV)

April 11
John Stuart Mill. Principles of political economy : and, Chapters on socialism (Selection from chap. I, IV, VI & IX)

April 18 
Ricardo, David. The principles of political economy and taxation (Chap. I, IV, VI, VII, VIII, XX, XXI, XXVI, XXVII & XXX)


April 25

Schumpeter, Joseph Alois. Capitalism, socialism, and democracy (Chap. V, VI, VI, XI, XIV, XV, XVI, XX.1, XX.2, XX.4, XXI.1, XX.4, XXII.1, XXII.2)

May 2

Piketty, Thomas, and Arthur Goldhammer. Capital in the twenty-first century (Introduction, selection from chap. I, V, XII, XIV, XV, XVI)

May 9 
Stiglitz, Joseph E. The Price of Inequality (Selection from chap. I, III, IV, V, VI, IX)

May 16
Stiglitz, Joseph E. Globalization and Its Discontents (Selection from chap. I, II, VII, IX)

May 19
Final paper due

Bibliography


Engels, Friedrich. The Origin of the family, private property, and the state. [electronic resource]. n.p.: London : Electric Book Co., c2001., 2001. Ikeda Library Catalog, EBSCOhost (accessed February 6, 2016).

Hume, David. An Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding: with Hume’s Abstract of A Treatise of Human Nature and A Letter from a Gentleman to His Friend in Edinburgh. 2nd ed. N.p.: Hackett Publishing Company, Inc., 1993.

Keynes, John M. The Essential Keynes. N.p.: Penguin Classics, 2015.

Keynes, John Maynard. The general theory of employment, interest, and money. n.p.: Amherst, N.Y. : Prometheus Books, 1997., 1997. Ikeda Library Catalog, EBSCOhost(accessed February 6, 2016).

Marx, Karl. Capital: A Critique of Political Economy. Vol. 1. N.p.: Penguin Classics, 1992.

Mill, John Stuart, Jonathan Riley, and John Stuart Mill. Principles of political economy : and, Chapters on socialism. n.p.: Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 1994., 1994. Ikeda Library Catalog, EBSCOhost (accessed February 6, 2016).

Piketty, Thomas, and Arthur Goldhammer. Capital in the twenty-first century. n.p.: Cambridge Massachusetts : The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 2014., 2014. Ikeda Library Catalog, EBSCOhost (accessed February 6, 2016).

Proudhon, Pierre-Joseph. What Is Property? : An Inquiry Into the Principle of Right and of Government. Auckland: The Floating Press, 1840. eBook Collection (EBSCOhost), EBSCOhost (accessed February 6, 2016).

Ricardo, David. The principles of political economy and taxation. n.p.: New York : Dutton, [1965], 1965. Ikeda Library Catalog, EBSCOhost (accessed February 6, 2016).

Rousseau, Jean-Jacques. The Social Contract. N.p.: Penguin Classics, 1968.

Schumpeter, Joseph Alois. Capitalism, socialism, and democracy. n.p.: New York : Harper & Row, 1976., 1976. Ikeda Library Catalog, EBSCOhost (accessed February 6, 2016).

Shatz, Marshall, ed. Bakunin: Statism and Anarchy. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1990.

Stiglitz, Joseph E. Globalization and Its Discontents (Norton Paperback). N.p.: W. W. Norton & Company, 2003.

Stiglitz, Joseph E. The Price of Inequality: How Today’s Divided Society Endangers Our Future. N.p.: W. W. Norton & Company, 2013.

Media & Democratization: Learning Cluster 2015

Class Website

Course Objectives



In the last decades, the governments of Venezuela, Brazil, Bolivia, Ecuador, Uruguay and Argentina have sought, through media reform, more participation in the production and distribution of media in principle to assure a plurality of voices. This political undertaking, which supporters of these elected governments see as an instrumental part of the process of re-democratization, is at the center of a controversial endeavor to overcome inequality in Latin America. For instance, the governments of Brazil, Venezuela and Argentina, have advanced new regulations through their respective congresses that are believed to be instrumental in the democratization of mass media.

This Learning Cluster will explore the critical intersections of media, democratization, and social struggles Latin America. Together we will analyze the media as key political-economic institutions, as the public sphere or contested political-cultural arenas within which political and social struggles are waged. As such, the media will be understood as the object of political struggles over legislation or regulations that shape its functioning and also as a way to reinforce participatory practices and community projects. Students interested in this course should be willing to theorize and imagine new political, economic, social and cultural systems that are more participatory and egalitarian. Our focus will center on analyzing how different types of media platforms (corporate, state/public, party, community, social, etc.) play a role in current struggles and on how particular types of media restructuring reshape power relations at all levels.
The following are some questions I would like to consider in this LC: What is the role of the State in the production and distribution of media (TV programming, radio programming, film, internet programming) in the past few decades of neoliberal economics, post-dictatorship democratization processes, and increasing popular resistance to inequality in Latin America? How is “identity” shaped by different media formats? Have new digital technologies helped to undermine the monopoly of media conglomerates? What are some of the theoretical and ideological debates around the role of the media in the consolidation of democracy and the pursuit of social justice? How do social movements use and/or create their own media? What are some of the contributions of grassroots organizations and groups in the ongoing process of democratization?
Students enrolled in this LC will be part of a working group that will generate an application for a Nieves Grant to visit Latin America next academic year to continue research on this topic.


Bibliography 


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Barnett, C. (2003). The Production of Communicative Spaces: Formations of the Public. In Culture and Democracy Media, Space, and Representation (pp. 33-53). Tuscaloosa: The University of Alabama Press.

Barnett, C. (2003). Technologies of Citizenship: Assembling Media Publics. In Culture and Democracy Media, Space, and Representation (pp. 81-107). Tuscaloosa: The University of Alabama Press.

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Diez, C. (2015, January 20). Venimos de una hegemonia de la imagen. Retrieved January 20, 2015, from http://www.pagina12.com.ar/diario/suplementos/espectaculos/17-34518-2015-01-20.html

Dinneen, M. (2012). The Chavez Government and the Battle Over the Media in Venezuela. Asian Journal of Latin American Studies, 25(2), 27-53. Retrieved January, 2015.

Dornfeld, B., & Larkin, B. (2002). Putting American Public Television Documentary in Its Places. In F. Ginsburg & L. Abu-Lughod (Eds.), Media Worlds Anthropology on New Terrain (pp. 247-263). University of California Press.

Downing, J., Ford, T., Gil, G., & Stein, L. (2000). Social Movements, the Public Sphere, Networks. In Radical Media: Rebellious Communication and Social (pp. 23-37). Sage Publications.

Downing, J., Ford, T., Gil, G., & Stein, L. (2000). Community, Democracy, Dialogue, and Radical Media. In Radical Media: Rebellious Communication and Social (pp. 38-55). Sage Publications.

Downing, J., Ford, T., Gil, G., & Stein, L. (2000). Art, Aesthetics, Radical Media, and Communication. In Radical Media: Rebellious Communication and Social (pp. 56-66). Sage Publications.

Downing, J., Ford, T., Gil, G., & Stein, L. (2000). Radical Media Organization: Two Models. InRadical Media: Rebellious Communication and Social (pp. 67-74). Sage Publications.

Durham, G.M., Kellner, M. D. (2001). Media and Cultural Studies: KeyWorks. Oxford: Blackwell.

Ford, T., & Gil, G. (2000). Radical Internet Use. In Radical Media: Rebellious Communication and Social (pp. 201-234). Carbondale: Sage Publications.

Fox, E. (1988). Introduction. In Dias de Bail: El fracaso ded la Reforma en la Television de America Latin (pp. 9-16). Paris: Felefacs.

Fox, E. (1988). La Reforma de la television chilena. In Dias de Bail: El fracaso ded la Reforma en la Television de America Latin (pp. 103-121). Paris: Felefacs.

Fox, E. (1988). Antecedentes de la reforma. In Dias de Bail: El fracaso ded la Reforma en la Television de America Latin (pp. 17-53).Paris: Felefacs.

Fox, J. (1998). The Difficult Transition from Clientelism to Citizenship: Lessons from Mexico. In D. Chalmers, C. Vilas, K. Hite, S. Martin, K. Piester, & M. Segarra (Eds.), The New Politics of Inequality in Latin America Rethinking Participation and Representation (Vol. 391-420). New York: Oxford University Press.

Freire, P. (2013). Society in Transition. In Education for Critical Consciousness (Reprint Edition ed., pp. 3-18). Bloomsbury Academic.

Fromson, M. (1996). Mexico’s Struggle for a Free Press. In R. Cole (Ed.), Communication in Latin America Journalism, Mass Media, and Society (pp. 115-137). Ailmington: Scholarly Resources.

Ginsburg, F., Abu-Lughod, L., & Larkin, B. (2002). Introduction. In Media Worlds Anthropology on New Terrain (pp. 1-36). University of California Press.

Gonzalez-Rodriguez, G., & Lugo-Ocando, J. (2008). The Media in Chile: The Restoration of Democracy and the Subsequent Concentration of Media Ownership. In The Media in Latin America (pp. 61-77). Open University Press.

Greenwald, G. (2010). Limiting Democracy: The American Media’s World View, and Ours.Social Research, 77(3), 827-838.

Greenwald, G. (2014). No Place to Hide: Edward Snowden, The NSA, and the U.S. Surveillance State. New York: Metropolitan Books.

Guedas-Bailey, O., & Jambeiro Barbosa, O. (2008). The Media in Brazil: An Historical Overview of Brazilian Broadcasting Politics. In J. Lugo-Ocando (Ed.), The Media in Latin America.(pp. 46-60). Open University Press.

Gurevitch, M., Coleman, S., Blumler, J., & Graber, D. (2011). Political Communication: Old and New Media Relationships. In Media Power In Politics (Sixth Edition ed., pp. 45-56). Washington D.C.: CQ Press.

Hall, S. (1997). Representation: Cultural Representations and Signifying Practices. SAGE. London.

Hargittai, E. (2011). Minding the digital gap: Why understandings digital inequality matters. In S. Papathanassopoulos (Ed.), Media Perspectives for the 21st Century (pp. 231-240). Routledge.

Hindman, M. (2009). The Internet and the “Democratization” of Politics. In The Myth of Digital Democracy (pp. 1-19). Princeton University Press.

Hindman, M. (2009). “Googlearchy”: The Link Structure of Political Web Sites. In The Myth of Digital Democracy (pp. 38-57). Princeton University Press.

Hindman, M. (2009). Political Traffic and the Politics of Search. In The Myth of Digital Democracy (pp. 58-81). Princeton University Press.

Hoover, S., & Emerich, M. (2011). Introduction: Media, Spiritualities and Social Change. In Media, Spiritualities and Social Change (pp. 1-12). London: Continuum.

Hughes, S., & Lugo-Ocando, J. (2008). The Media in Mexico: From Authoritarians to Hybrid System. In The Media in Latin America. (pp. 131-149). Open University Press.

Johansson, T., & Rosengran, K. (1994). Late modernity, consumer culture and lifestyles: Toward a cognitive-affective theory. In Media effects and beyond: Culture, socialization and lifestyles (pp. 265-293). New York: Routledge.

Landau, S., & Hayden, T. (2002). The Zapatista Army of National Liberation Part of the Latin Americn Revolutionary Tradition– But also very Different. In The Zapatista Reader (pp. 146-152). New York: Thunder’s Mouth Press.

Levitsky, S., & Mainwaring, S. (2005). Argentina: Democratic Survival amidst Economic Failure. In F. Hagopian (Ed.), The Third Wave of Democratization in Latin America Advances and Setbacks (pp. 63-89). Cambridge University Press.

Lopes, I. (2013). Political Culture and the Democratization of Communications in Brazil. Latin American Perspectives, 40 No. 3(190), 129-140.

Mainwaring, S., & Mainwaring, F. (2005). Introduction. In The Third Wave of Democratization in Latin America Advances and Setbacks (pp. 1-13). Cambridge University Press.

Mainwaring, S., Perez-Linan, A., & Mainwaring, S. (2005). Latin American Democratization since 1978: Democratic Transitions, Breakdowns, and Erosions. In F. Hagopian (Ed.), The Third Wave of Democratization in Latin America Advances and Setbacks (pp. 14-59). Cambridge University Press.

McAllister, M. (2011). Consumer culture and new media: Commodity fetishism in the digital era. In S. Papathanassopoulos (Ed.), Media Perspectives for the 21st Century (pp. 149-165). Routledge.

McChesney, R. (2004). The Age of Hyper-Commercialism. In The Problem of the Media (pp. 138-174). New York: Monthly Review Press.

Meikle, G. (2008). Whacking Bush. In M. Boler (Ed.), Digital Media and Democracy Tactics in Hard Times (pp. 371-382). Massachusetts: The MIT Press.

Mellado, C., & Lagos, C. (2013). Redefining Comparative Analyses of Media Systems from the Perspective of New Democracies. Communication & Society, 26(4), 1-24.

Montgomery, L., & Cole, R. (1996). The Role of Women in Latin American Mass Media. InCommunication in Latin America Journalism, Mass Media, and Society (pp. 37-49). Ailmington: Scholarly Resources.

Murphy, P. (2007). Introduction Media and Democracy in the Age of Globalization. In I. Blankson & P. Murphy (Eds.), Negotiating Democracy Media Transformations in Emerging Democracies (pp. 1-11). State University of New York Press.

Navarro, L. (2002). Mexico’s Secret War. In T. Hayden (Ed.), The Zapatista Reader (pp. 61-68). Thunder’s Mouth Press.

Nichols, J. (1996). Effects of International Propaganda on U.S.-Cuban Relations. In R. Cole (Ed.),Communication in Latin America Journalism, Mass Media, and Society (pp. 71-103). Ailmington: Scholarly Resources.

Nichols, J., & McChesney, R. (2013, November 6). Free the Media! Retrieved fromhttp://www.thenation.com/article.177033/free-media

Nichols, J., & McChesney, R. (2008, May 29). Who’ll Unplug Big Media? Stay Tuned. Retrieved from http://www.thenation.com/article/wholl-unplug-big-media-stay-tuned#

Palavicini, G. (2011). Mass Media’s Influence on the Transformation of the Mexican Political Regime. Latin America Policy, 2(2), 234-246.

Papathanassopoulos, S. (2011). Introduction: Media perspectives for the 21st century. In S. Papathanassopoulos (Ed.), Media Perspectives for the 21st Century (pp. 1-17). Routledge.

Paz, O. (2002). The Media Spectacle Comes to Mexico. In T. Hayden (Ed.), The Zapatista Reader (pp. 30-33). Thunder’s Mouth Press.

Pingree, S., & Hawkins, R. (1994). Looking for Patterns in Lifestyle Behaviours. In K. Rosengran (Ed.), Media effects and beyond: Culture, socialization and lifestyles (pp. 76-96). New York: Routledge.

Poniatowska, E. (2002). Voices from the Jungle Subcomandante Marcos and Culture. In T. Hayden (Ed.), The Zapatista Reader (pp. 373-381). Thunder’s Mouth Press.

Relly, J., & Gonzalez de Bustamante, C. (2013). Silencing Mexico: A Study of Influences on Journalists in the Northern States. The International Journal of Press/ Politics, Sage Publications, Inc.-Sage Publications, Inc.

Rockwell, R. (2007). Vestiges of Authoritarianism Monopoly Broadcasting in Central America. In I. Blankson & P. Murphy (Eds.), Negotiating Democracy Media Transformations in Emerging Democracies (pp. 35-50). New York: State University of New York Press.

Santos, B. (2014). Manifesto for Good Living/ Buen Vivir AND Minifesto for Intellectual-Activists. In Epistemologies of the South Justice against Epistemicide (pp. 2-17). Paradigm.

Santos, B. (2014). Introduction Creating a Distance in Relation to Western-centric Political Imagination and Critical Theory. In Epistemologies of the South Justice against Epistemicide (pp. 19-46). Paradigm.

Schimmel, S. (2011). The Blogosphere of Resistance: Anonymous Blogging as a Safe Haven for Chellenging Religious Authority and Creating Dissident Communities. In Media, Spiritualities and Social Change (pp. 147-157). London: Continuum.

Selb, P., & Graber, D. (2011). The Al Jazeera Effect: How the New Global Media are Reshaping World Politics. In Media Power In Politics (Sixth ed., pp. 283-291). Washington D.C.: CQ Press.

Selverston, M. (1998). The Politics of Identity Reconstruction: Indians and Democracy in Ecuador. In D. Chalmers, C. Vilas, K. Hite, S. Martin, K. Piester, & M. Segarra (Eds.), The New Politics of Inequality in Latin America Rethinking Participation and Representation(pp. 170-191). New York: Oxford University Press.

Sinclair, J. (1999). Introduction. In Latin American Television: A Global View (pp. 1-32). Oxford University Press.

Sinclair, J. (1999). The Autumn of the Patriarch: Mexico and Televisa. In Latin American Television: A Global View (pp. 33-62). Oxford University Press.

Sinclair, J. (1999). The Latin American Continent: Brazil, Venezuela, and Argentina. In Latin American Television: A Global View (pp. 63-91). Oxford University Press.

Sitrin, M. (2012). Horizontalidad. In Everyday Revolutions: Horizontalism and Autonomy in Argentina (pp. 61-82). Zed Books.

Sitrin, M. (2012). New subjectives and Affective Politics. In EVERYDAY REVOLUTIONS Horizontalism and Autonomy in Argentina (pp. 83-100). Zed Books.

Sturken, M., Thomas, D., J. Ball-Rokeach S. (2004). Technological Visions: The Hopes and Fears That Shape New Technologies. Philadelphia: Temple University Press.

Sutton, B. (2008). Contesting Racism: Democratic Citizenship, Human Rights, and Antiracist Politics in Argentina. Latin American Perspectives, 35(6), 106-121. Retrieved from JSTOR.

Swartz, A. (2008, July 1). Guerilla Open Access Manifesto. Retrieved January 1, 2015, fromhttp://archive.org/stream/GuerillaOpenAccess

Tufekci, Z. (2014). Social Movements and Governments in the Digital Age: Evaluating a Complex Landscape. Journal of International Affairs, 68(1), 1-18.

Turner, T. (2002). Representation, Politics, and Cultural Imagination in Indigenous Video. In F. Ginsburg, L. Abu-Lughod, & B. Larkin (Eds.), Media Worlds Anthropology on New Terrain(pp. 75-89). University of California Press.

Micklethwait, J. (Ed.). (2014, November 29). Everybody wants to rule the world. The Economist, 19-22.

Micklethwait, J. (Ed.). (2014, November 8). How high can it fly? The Economist, 63-64.

Micklethwait, J. (Ed.). (2014, November 18). The future of magic. The Economist, 157-157.

Vialey, P., Belinche, M., & Tovar, C. (2008). The Media in Argentina:Democracy, Crisis and the Reconfiguration of Media Groups. In J. Lugo-Ocando (Ed.), The Media in Latin America(pp. 13-27). Open University Press.

Webster, F., & Papathanassopoulos, S. (2011). Information and democracy: The weakening of social democracy. In Media Perspectives for the 21st Century (pp. 22-40). Routledge.

Wilkinson, K. (2011). Democracy Sponsored by Nafta? Mexican Television in the Free Trade Era. In I. Blankson & P. Murphy (Eds.), Negotiating Democracy Media Transformations in Emerging Democracies (pp. 199-218). New York: State University of New York Press.

Williams, B., & Carpini, M. (2011). 9/11 and Its Aftermath. In After Broadcast News: Media Regimes, Democracy, and the New Information Environment (pp. 222-277). Cambridge University Press.

Williams, B., & Carpini, M. (2011). Shaping a New Media Regime. In After Broadcast News: Media Regimes, Democracy, and the New Information Environment (pp. 278-326). Cambridge University Press.

Williams, R. (1974). Television: Technology and Cultural Form. London: Routledge.

Wroe, A. (2014, November 18). Farewell to escapism (J. Micklethwait, Ed.). The Economist, 158-158.

Vodovnik, Z. (2004). !Ya Basta! Ten Years of the Zapatista Uprising. Oakland: AK Press.

Human Rights & Democratization in Latin America

Tomás F. Crowder-Taraborrelli
Soka University of America
Course meets: 1:00- 4:00 p.m.
Office: Ikeda 414


Office hours: By appointment


HUMAN RIGHTS AND DEMOCRATIZATION IN LATIN AMERICA
INTS 490
Advanced topics in International Studies

Introduction

This course is designed for students who have already taken an introductory human rights course. As such, it will further contextualize human rights as an ethical and judicial principle, and draw analytical parallels to the development of political rights under colonialism, liberalism, and neoliberalism in Latin America. This is an interdisciplinary course; students will read essays, watch documentary and fiction films, listen to music and research the life and work of Latin American authors and social movements. The course will give students a general knowledge of major political events in the region that have challenged established notions of human rights and justice.

Special attention will be given to the systematic use of violence during the armed conflicts of the 1960s and 1970s and the textual and visual testimonies that attempt to document the trauma of political groups and human rights organizations repressed by terrorist States. We will examine the neoliberal turn in politics and human rights rhetoric and track its impact on international law and local governance. An important part of this course will be to consider the role that documentation has played in cataloging atrocities. We will consider groundbreaking evidence that has paved the way for democratic reforms in certain countries and helped to change complicated amnesty laws that have historically blocked the prosecution of crimes against humanity. We will also explore the role of amnesty laws within the larger international legal community.

Assignments
Proposal for research paper                           15% (4 pages)
Annotated bibliography for research paper             10% (2 pages)
AR Presentation                                       10%
Discussion and participation                          30%
Final Paper                                           35% (15 pages)

Weekly required readings will be around 100 pages to be done ahead of class. You must come to class prepared for discussion. Read the text or texts assigned before class, take copious notes and come prepared to class with questions. Your participation not only will improve your overall grade but it is a fundamental part of the course’s success. Each student will lead one discussion seminar, introducing a text or the work of an author or filmmaker and explaining its relevance to the history of human rights in the region. We will watch films in class and attend a couple of screenings outside class (if possible). We will analyze films both as artistic products (formal qualities, cinematic genres and stylistic influences) and as sociological documents.

The course will culminate with a 15 page argumentative essay (research paper). I will be happy to discuss a prospectus for the essay and help you organize your bibliography.  Please type all written work using a standard 12-point font, use double-spaced text, leave a one-inch margin on all sides, and staple multiple pages. Late papers will be marked down 1/3 grade for each day late. Please follow the MLA Style or APA format for citations and general style formatting. You can find an online version of style manuals at:


Accommodation for Persons with a Disability
Student desiring accommodations on the basis of physical learning, or psychological disability for this class is to contact the Office of Student Services. Student Services is located in Student Affairs.

Please check on Brightspace for a weekly update of reading and writing assignments.

COURSE SCHEDULE

WEEK 1: Human Rights in Latin America

Friday September 8th
Introduction to the Course
 Cardenas, S. (2011). Human rights in Latin America: a politics of terror and hope. Philadelphia: Univ Of Pennsylvania Pr. (44 pgs). (CR) 46 pgs.
 Ishay, M. (2009). The history of human rights: from ancient times to the globalization era. Chapter 2. Berkeley, Calif.: University of California Press. (AR) 51 pgs.

FILM: Chicago Boys (2015), by Carola Fuentes and Rafael Valdeavellano (85 mins.)

*Thursday, September 14th:
Opening Art Show Soka University Gallery: Artists Sebastián Chillemi and Pablo Salvadó.  Sleeping in the Forest. Dreamscapes of nature and society. Reception: 5:30- 7:30 p.m.


WEEK 2: Dictatorships and State Repression during the Cold War

Friday September 15th
Amnesty International. “Urgent Action.” Santiago Maldonado
 Los Espiritus, “Perdida en el Fuego” [Recording]

Dinges, J. (2005). The Condor Years: how Pinochet and his allies brought terrorism to three continents. “The Condor System.” New York: New Press. (CR) 27 pags.
 Garcia Espinosa, Julio. “For an Imperfect Cinema.” Chomsky, A., Carr, B., & Smorkaloff, P. M. (2006). The Cuba reader: history, culture, politics. Durham: Duke University Press. (CR) 8 pgs.
 Walsh, Rodolfo. “Open Letter From A Writer To The Military Junta.” http://www.jus.gob.ar/media/2940455/carta_rw_ingles-espa_ol_web.pdf (CR)
 Walsh, Rodolfo. “Carta abierta de un escritor a la Junta Militar”.
El Pais. “Los 43 de Ayotzinapa, una cartografia de la violencia en Mexico”.
 https://elpais.com/internacional/2017/09/07/mexico/1504807666_400055.html


FILMS:

Olla Popular (1968), by Gerardo Vallejo (4 mins.) [in class screening]
Las AAA son las tres armas (1979), by Cine de la Base/Jorge Denti (16 mins.) [in class screening]
Raymundo, by Ernesto Ardito and Virna Molina (127 mins) [in class screening]


Friday, September 22nd
Archard, David and Colin M. Macleod. The Moral And Political Status of Children. Introduction. Chapter 2 & Chapter 3. (CR) 45 pages.
 Sikkink, Kathryn. The Justice Cascade: How Human Rights Prosecutions Are Changing World Politics. Do Human Rights Prosecutions Make A Difference?. (CR)  35 pgs.
 Ocampo Saravia, Tania. “Guerra y desaparición forzada de infantes en El Salvador.” Cultura y Representaciones Sociales, 2013.
 http://www.scielo.org.mx/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2007-81102013000200007 (AR)

FILM: The Metal Stork (2015), by Joan Lopez Lloret [in class screening]. 80 min.

Assignment: Please bring to class a hard copy of the topic of your research project and a brief description of it.


Friday, September 29th
Report (Argentina), Human Rights Watch “The Theft of Babies.” (CR) 4 pages.
Moon, Claire. “Forensic Knowledge, Human Remains and the Politics of the Past.” Latin American Perspectives, January 8, 2013 (CR) 20 pages
Equipo Peruano de Antropología Forense [explore the website] (CR) Explore the website.
Equipo Argentino de Antropología Forense [explore the website] (CR) Explore the website.
Testimony of Erik Stover y Clyde Snow in the Juntas Trial, Argentina (pgs. 17 and 18) (AR)
Cohen-Salama, M. Tumbas Anónimas: Informe sobre la identificación de restos de víctimas de la represión ilegal. (87-95) (AR)

FILM: NN, by Héctor Gálvez, 89 mins. [screening in class]


Friday, October 5th
FILM: Las Madres: The Mothers of Plaza Mayo by Lourdes Portillo & Susana Munoz, 1988 (64 minutes).

Knippers Black, Jan. The Politics of Human Rights Protection. Chapters 18 and 19. (CR) 25 pages.
United Nations Decade For Human Rights Education (1995-2004) [for your reference]
Navarro, Marysa. “The Personal is Political: Las Madres de Plaza de Mayo.” Power and Popular Protest: Latin American Social Movements. Ed. Susan Eckstein. (CR) 18 pages.

Estela de Carlotto, Press Conference [sequence screened in class]
A grandmother’s 36-year hunt for the child stolen by the Argentinian junta, The Guardian. [CR] 4 pgs.
 https://www.theguardian.com/world/2015/jun/07/grandmothers-of-plaza-de-mayo-36-year-hunt-for-stolen-child
Rivera Hernandez, Raul Diego y Mariana Ortega Brena. “Making Absence Visible: The Caravan of Central American Mothers in Search of Disappeared Migrants.” Latin American Perspectives, September 2017. (19 pages) [AR]

Assignment Due! Annotated Bibliography (bring a hard copy to class).


Friday, October 13th
FILM: Naomi Campbell: It’s Not Easy To Become A Different Person/ Naomi Campbell: No es facil convertirse en otra persona, by Nicolas Videla and Camila Jose Donoso, 85 min.

Corrales, Javier and Mario Pechemy. “Introduction.” The Comparative Politics of Sexuality in Latin America: A Reader on Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Rights. 30 pgs. (CR)
 Prieur, Annick. Mema’s House, Mexico City: On Transvestites, Queens, and Machos. “Stealing Femininity: On Bodily and Symbolic Constructions.” (CR) 39 pgs.

CNDH, Comision Nacional de los Derechos Humanos, “Los derechos humanos de los transgeneros, transexuales y travestis.” (AR) 36 pages
 http://www.cndh.org.mx/sites/all/doc/cartillas/2015-2016/31-DH-Transgenero.pdf
Mexico encara la crisis de los desaparecidos con una nueva ley, El Pais, 10/13/17
 https://elpais.com/internacional/2017/10/12/mexico/1507844976_896227.html


Friday, October 20th
FILM: Finding Oscar, Ryan Suffern.

Weld, Kirsten. “Introduction: The Power of Archival Thinking,” and “Revolutionary Lives in the Archives.” Paper Cadavers: The Archives of Dictatorship in Guatemala. (CR) 60 pages
 Sarkar, Bhaskar and Janet Walker. “Introduction: Moving Testimonies.” Documentary Testimonies: Global Archives of Suffering.  (AR) 25 pages.

*Tuesday, October 17th:
Workshop with Chilean muralist Camilo Diaz

Camilo Diaz will give a short talk and mural workshop called “Paint and Struggle” on Tuesday Oct 17 from 4:30 to 6:30.  Following a presentation and discussion about UMLEM, a group of Chilean muralists who work to create political and social change through public art, Mr. Diaz will guide students in their own politically oriented mural project.  Students will be able to paint murals within the Residence Halls.  


Friday, October 27th
Interview with SUA alumni. Human Rights violations in Venezuela.

For those interested in learning about the political situation in Venezuela please read the following article by Steve Ellner:

or

We will be reviewing all readings we have discussed so far in the semester. If you missed some of the screenings, please check out the films from the library and watch them before class.

FILM: Island of Flowers, by Jorge Furtado (1989)


Friday, November 3rd
Oral Presentations- 5-8 minutes.

Hicks, Kathryn and Nicole Fabricant. “The Bolivian Climate Justice Movement: Mobilizing Indigeneity in Climate Change Negotiations.” Latin American Perspectives, 2016 (CR)
“Who ordered Killing of Honduran Activist…” The New York Times.  (CR)
“Time has created distance…” The Guardian. (CR)
“Las consecuencias sociales del cambio climatico global” (AR)
 http://clacso.org.ar/megafon/megafon18.php

FILM: H20 mx, by Jose Cohen (2015) [sequence screened in class]


Friday, November 10th
Oral Presentations- 5-8 minutes.  (cont.)

Reportero, by Bernardo Ruiz, 2013. (73 mins.)
Silva Lopes, Ivonete. “Political Culture and the Democratization of Communications in Brazil.” LAP


Friday, November 17th
Media and Democratization in Latin America, by Javier Campo and Tomás Crowder-Taraborrelli. (Lecture of forthcoming special issue of Latin American Perspectives on Media and Democratization in Latin America).
 Silva Lopes, Ivonete. “Political Culture and the Democratization of Communications in Brazil.” LAP (reading from last week) (CR)
 Zamorano Villareal, Gabriela. “The Plan Nacional, a Process of Indigenous Communication.” Indigenous Media and Political Imaginaries in Contemporary Bolivia. (to be uploaded soon).  (CR)

Assessment of Media Development in Bolivia (UN Report) Category 2 (pgs. 37-50). (AR)
 http://unesdoc.unesco.org/images/0024/002469/246906e.pdf
Keynote Lecture Iván Sanjinés, Visible Evidence Buenos Aires, 2017.
 https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=161&v=Caa699iwHdo
Plurinacional TV
 http://www.plurinacional.tv/v/wsCF2y6xN0R


Friday, December 1st.
Oral Presentations- 5-8 minutes.  (cont.)

“Islamabad,” Fito Paez

Aquarius, Kleber Mendonca Filho. 2 hrs. 26 mins. (shown in two parts).

Maricato, Erminia. “The Future of Global Peripheral Cities.” Latin American Perspectives, March 2017. (CR)
Friendly, Abigail. “Urban Policy, Social Movements, and the Right to the the City in Brazil.” Latin American Perspectives, March 2017. (CR)

Please go over this articles before class:

“Argentina ‘death flight pilots sentenced to death…” The Guardian. (AR)
AL Jazeera
Friday, December 8th

Aquarius, Kleber Mendonca Filho. 2 hrs. 26 mins. (second part/discussion of the film).

Rocha, Glauber. “Aesthetic of Hunger.” 

Continue our discussion of:

Maricato, Erminia. “The Future of Global Peripheral Cities.” Latin American Perspectives, March 2017. (CR)

Friendly, Abigail. “Urban Policy, Social Movements, and the Right to the the City in Brazil.” Latin American Perspectives, March 2017. (CR)


Friday, December 15th
Deadline to submit your final research project.
Please submit via email your final research paper by 6 p.m.

Bibliography


Archard, David, and Colin M. Macleod. The moral and political status of children. Oxford University Press, 2005.


Aquarius, Directed by Kleber Mendonca Filho, 2016.

Assessment of Media Development in Bolivia. UNESCO, 2017.

Barcelos, Iuri and Natalia Viana. “Revealed: fires in São Paulo Favelas more likely on higher-value land.” The Guardian, 2017.

Campo, Javier and Tomás Crowder-Taraborrelli. Media and Democratization in Latin America: Lecture of forthcoming special issue of Latin American Perspectives on Media and Democratization in Latin America. 2017. 


Cardenas, Sonia. Human rights in Latin America: a politics of terror and hope. Univ Of Pennsylvania Press, 2011.

Chicago Boys. Directed by Carola Fuentes and Rafael Valdevellano. 2015.

CNDH, Comision Nacional de los Derechos Humanos Mexico, “Los derechos humanos de los transgeneros, transexuales y travestis.” http://www.cndh.org.mx/sites/all/doc/cartillas/2015-2016/31-DH-Transgenero.pdf

Cohen-Salama, M. Tumbas Anónimas: Informe sobre la identificación de restos de víctimas de la represión ilegal. Catálogos Editora, 1992. pp. 87-95. 


Collyns, Dan. “Time has created distance: Peru’s filmmakers take on country’s long conflict.” The Guardian, 2017.

Corrales, Javier and Mario Pechemy. “Introduction.” The Comparative Politics of Sexuality in Latin America: A Reader on Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Rights. University of Pittsburgh Press. 2010.

Cowie, Sam. “Inside Crackland: the open-air drug market that São Paulo just can’t kick.” The Guardian, 2017.

Dinges, J. “The Condor System.” The Condor Years: how Pinochet and his allies brought terrorism to three continents. New York: New Press. 2005. 


Ellner, Steve. “Venezuela’s Fragile Revolution.” Monthly Review: An Independent Socialist Magazine, vol. 69, no. 05. 2017.

Equipo Argentino de Antropología Forense. http://www.eaaf.org/

Equipo Peruano de Antropología Forense. http://epafperu.org/en

Estela de Carlotto, Press Conference. YouTube, 2014. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MDC-WXz2GS8

Ferri, Pablo. “Los 43 de Ayotzinapa, una cartografía de la violencia en México.” El País. 2017.

Finding Oscar. Directed by Ryan Suffern. 2016.

Friendly, Abigail. “Urban Policy, Social Movements, and the Right to the the City in Brazil.” Latin American Perspectives, 2017.

Gallegos, Zorayda. “Mexico encara la crisis de los desaparecidos con una nueva ley.” El Pais, 13 October, 2017.

Garcia Espinosa, Julio. “For an Imperfect Cinema.” The Cuba reader: history, culture, politics. Eds. Chomsky, A., Carr, B., & Smorkaloff, P. M.Durham: Duke University Press. 2006.

Goñi, Uki. “A grandmother’s 36-year hunt for the child stolen by the Argentinian junta.” The Guardian. 2015.

Goñi, Uki. “Argentina ‘death flight’ pilots sentenced or deaths including pope’s friends.” The Guardian, 2017.

Hellinger, Daniel and Anthony P. Spanakos. The Legacy of Hugo Chávez. Latin American Perspectives, 2016.

Hicks, Kathryn and Nicole Fabricant. “The Bolivian Climate Justice Movement: Mobilizing Indigeneity in Climate Change Negotiations.” Latin American Perspectives, 2016.

H20 mx. Directed by Jose Cohen, 2015.

Island of Flowers. Directed by Jorge Furtado. YouTube, 1989.

“Islamabad,” by Fito Paez. YouTube, 2017. 


Ishay, Micheline R. The history of human rights: from ancient times to the globalization era. Univ. of California Press. 2009.

Keynote Lecture Iván Sanjinés, Visible Evidence Buenos Aires, 2017. Plurinacional TV, 2017.

Knippers Black, Jan. The Politics of Human Rights Protection. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 2009.

Las AAA son las tres armas. Directed by Jorge Denti. Cine de la Base. 1979.

“Las consecuencias sociales del cambio climatico global.” Megafon: La Batalla de las ideas, 2017.

Las Madres: The Mothers of Plaza Mayo. Directed by Lourdes Portillo & Susana Munoz. 1988.

“Living on the Edge: São Paulo’s Inequality Mapped.” The Guardian, 17.

Los Espíritus. “Perdida en el fuego.” 2017.

Malking, Elizabeth. “Who ordered Killing of Honduran Activist…” The New York Times, 2017.

Maricato, Erminia. “The Future of Global Peripheral Cities.” Latin American Perspectives, 2017.

Michael, Chris, et all. “Guardian Cities: Live from São Paulo’s occupations.” The Guardian, 2017.

Moon, Claire. “Forensic Knowledge, Human Remains and the Politics of the Past.” Latin American Perspectives. 2013.

Naomi Campbell: It’s Not Easy To Become A Different Person/ Naomi Campbell: No es facil convertirse en otra persona. Directed by Nicolas Videla and Camila Jose Donoso, 2013.

Navarro, Marysa. “The Personal is Political: Las Madres de Plaza de Mayo.” Power and Popular Protest: Latin American Social Movements. Ed. Susan Eckstein. University of California Press, 2001.

NN. Directed by Héctor Gálvez. 2014

Ocampo Saravia, Tania. “Guerra y desaparición forzada de infantes en El Salvador.” Cultura y Representaciones Sociales, 2013.

Olla Popular, Directed Gerardo Vallejo. 1968.

Prieur, Annick. “Stealing Femininity: On Bodily and Symbolic Constructions.” Mema’s House, Mexico City: On Transvestites, Queens, and Machos. 1968.

Raymundo. Directed by Ernesto Ardito and Virna Molina. Vassar College NY. 2003.

Reportero. Directed by Bernardo Ruiz. Kanopy, 2013.

“Resistance! São Paulo’s homeless seize the city.” The Guardian, 2017.

Rivera Hernandez, Raul Diego y Mariana Ortega Brena. “Making Absence Visible: The Caravan of Central American Mothers in Search of Disappeared Migrants.” Latin American Perspectives, September 2017.

Rocha, Glauber. “Aesthetic of Hunger/Aesthetic of Dream.” Diagonal Thoughts.

Sarkar, Bhaskar and Janet Walker. “Introduction: Moving Testimonies.” Documentary Testimonies: Global Archives of Suffering. Routledge, 2009.

Sikkink, Kathryn. The justice cascade: how human rights prosecutions are changing world politics. W.W. Norton & Co., 2011.

Silva Lopes, Ivonete. “Political Culture and the Democratization of Communications in Brazil.” Latin American Perspectives, 2014.

“Testimony of Erik Stover y Clyde Snow in the Juntas Trial.” El Diario del Juicio. 1985.

The Metal Stork. Directed by Joan Lopez Lloret. 2015.

“The Theft of Babies.” Report (Argentina), Human Rights Watch.

United Nations Decade For Human Rights Education (1995-2004). United Nations Human Rights Office of the High Commissioner.

“Urgent Action.” Amnesty International. Santiago Maldonado. 2017.

Walsh, Rodolfo. “Open Letter From A Writer To The Military Junta.” Archivo Nacional de la Memoria. 1977.

Weld, Kirsten. Paper Cadavers: The Archives of Dictatorship in Guatemala. Duke University Press Books, 2014.

Zamorano Villareal, Gabriela. “The Plan Nacional, a Process of Indigenous Communication.” Indigenous Media and Political Imaginaries in Contemporary Bolivia. University of Nebraska Press, 2017.

Sustainable Housing & Urban Development: Learning Cluster 2014

Tomas F. Crowder-Taraborrelli
Learning Cluster Syllabus
Winter 2014
Introduction

Last year, Professor Tomas Crowder-Taraborrelli led a Learning Cluster to Argentina to study and build a sustainable house in Buenos Aires. The trip was a great learning experience for everyone. We all felt this LC should be organized a second time in order to elaborate on the 2013 Sustainable Housing Cluster experience.* Once again, we’ve recruited some of the same scholars, architects, and artists that made last year’s LC such a great success.
 We are still inspired by the same research questions: Why have homes become unaffordable for most people in the world? Is it due to the cost of land, the price of construction, property taxes, and/or public services? Why must one hire an architect or an engineer when, with limited training, one can build a home by hiring just a few workers? How can these sustainable practices impact future growth of underdeveloped areas? Our Learning Cluster will explore ways in which many people in the world have built houses with reclaimed, environmentally conscious and aesthetically pleasing materials. We will also explore the connections between this type of sustainable, efficient development and how it can potentially reconcile the disconnection between urban and rural development.
While the earthship sustainable adobe homes are gaining traction in many parts of the developed world, this type of construction has long been practiced in Argentina. Indigenous communities built their homes with adobe; many of them are still standing in the North. Pioneer adobe builder Jorge Belanko, mentored by Professor Gernot Minke, founder of Earth Architecture, has committed his life to building adobe houses in Southern Argentina and to teaching others the simple construction methods. Belanko produced a well-known didactic documentary film that demonstrates the different techniques in earth building. He argues in Las manos, el barro, la casa that since the 1930s, construction with earth has been deemed to be for “poor” people; that a whole business was built around the concept that “hard materials” like concrete, are longer lasting, more elegant, and more valuable. Belanko, is one of many Argentines, redeeming an indigenous building practice that is cost-effective, easy to accomplish, environmentally sound, aesthetically pleasing, and safe. Earth building as demonstrated by the interest in Belanko’s work, is particularly popular in countries like Argentina where building materials are expensive.
*For more information about the sustainable housing project, please visit last year’s Learning Cluster website.

Purpose of the Learning Cluster

This Learning Cluster will examine the social, economic, and environmental problems of housing and urban development in Buenos Aires, one of Latin America’s most populous cities, and ways in which sustainable adobe construction is being positioned by many as a possible solution. Since the 1970s, metropolitan areas in Latin America have grown dramatically, as has the income inequality between the wealthy and the poor. Slums commonly referred to as villas miserias, have increasingly become perilous ways for the poor to gain access to housing. In the last decades, the wealthy, in part influenced by unrelenting media stories about crime and insecurity have moved to the suburbs to build luxurious homes in gated communities. Conversely, slums like the well-known Villa 31 in Buenos Aires continue to expand, presenting their own sets of complex environmental issues. By analyzing ways in which sustainable housing can safely and efficiently modify the living standards in the slums, this course will assuredly transform the skepticism about sustainable housing and provide for a more educated approach to urban development in Latin America.  Urban transformation has had profound cultural, social, and political consequences for society at large.
During the first part of this travel course, we will study the rich architectural history of Buenos Aires, once considered to be the “Paris” of Latin America because of its neoclassical
buildings and wide boulevards. We will consider the decisive historical events that have shaped its urban identity. We will visit traditionally wealthy neighborhoods like Barrio Norte, working class neighborhoods like La Boca, and neighborhoods that are currently experiencing rapid transformation due to a real estate boom like Palermo Soho, Palermo Hollywood, and Puerto Madero. We will also visit the politically charged Villa 31, a slum that was built in one of the wealthiest neighborhoods of the city. Mercedes Maria Weiss, professor of art-history and architecture at the University of Buenos Aires, will lead seminars on urban history and development for our LC. The objective of these seminars will be to understand the economic and political forces that have ordered and regulated the construction of neighborhoods and housing along economic lines.
During the second part of the course, we will travel to Ingeniero Maschwitz, in the Northern part of the city, and participate on an eco-construction team with plastic artist Pablo Salvadó, where the Sustainable Housing Learning Cluster took place last year. We will participate in helping to build a sustainable adobe building. This building will eventually be completely self-sufficient and off the electricity, water and sewage grid.  
Students will have hands-on experience in the design and construction of a low-impact natural building that requires little training in construction. Based on last year’s experience,  students will form teams according to their interests. These teams will be coordinated by Professor Crowder-Taraborrelli and Professor Weiss and consist of:
* a design team ( which will draw plans for the structure of the building)
*  a budget team (which will calculate costs for purchasing equipment and materials)
*an environmental and services team (which will assess the resources available in the area, design and install electricity and water access)
* a building team (which will coordinate the field work)
The building workshop will run from 9A.M.-5 P.M.  Plastic artist Pablo Salvadó will provide all materials and tools. Among the many skills students will learn during the workshop on earth building are: laying out a rock foundation and perimeter drain, building small and medium size walls with discarded car tires, mixing adobe and plastering walls with adobe (clay), and participating in the design of a sustainable garden. Professor Weiss will explain the rain collection system that will be hooked to underground tanks to students. Cristián Torlasco, an Argentine national who obtained his architectural degree at the University of Oregon, will also be on sight to advise the project. He has built two sustainable homes in the past. In order to capture this experience, the students will create a short documentary (15-20 minutes) to be presented at the Learning Cluster Fair. This short documentary will help to educate SUA students about the practical, structural, and societal effects of living a sustainable life, as well as the positive effects on the environment and humanity.

Course Objectives

1.Gain a deeper understanding of the significance of sustainable living where environmentally stable housing and financial security is under threat.

2. Research the process and practice of sustainable construction using both recycled and natural resources.

3. Perform a comparative study between southern California and the province of Buenos Aires in regards to property management and building permit regulations where sustainable construction is concerned.

4. Critically analyze the contrasting architectural styles as well as the use of materials among affluent and impoverished communities.

5. Create meaningful relationships between the group and organizations in Argentina dedicated to building sustainable homes.

6. Facilitate discussions that encourage social change through community activism.

Learning Outcomes

Team building; experience hands on learning; production and construction of a documentary.

As the universal movement for sustainable living collects momentum, the students of this Learning Cluster will have a much more expansive and tangible understanding of what it takes to bring the theory of sustainable living into practice. By visiting and exploring wealthy and poor neighborhoods alike, students will gain knowledge of both the materials and resources that have been utilized, in a highly contrasting way, to create the city of Buenos Aires. Students will aspire to achieve the following learning outcomes in a variety of ways:

Develop students’ habits of independent inquiry and study: Prior to leaving for Argentina, all students will form research teams and present their findings to the rest of the class. The documentary aspect of the project in Argentina will provide another avenue for independent growth, as students will be able to develop their own questions to be asked in interviews as well as organize visual material to complement the pedagogical objectives of the Learning Cluster.

Engender analytical and investigative skills and the ability to apply them to a specific problem or question: During their first week in Argentina students will develop questions and expectations based both on their own research as well as research presented by their classmates. During the second and third weeks, they will combine this research with firsthand experience in order to understand how to bridge the gap between theory and practice.

Enhance the ability to work collaboratively: Students will be working together to organize the trip, develop the documentary interviews, divide the subject matter, and create a cohesive final project.  They will also have to develop a steadfast work ethic to include all team members, both domestic and international, who will be collaborating and contributing to the success of the project.  The experience in its entirety will require students to depend on each other’s skills, including Spanish speaking abilities, different cultural understandings, and creative writing talents.

Foster a contributive ethic by working on issues that have a larger social significance or meaning: The creation of sustainable housing not only benefits the immediate community and the environment directly, but also ripples out to provide an alternative way to build a house for people who cannot afford the standard industrialized, corporate approach to building. Our documentary will further contribute to spreading awareness about the feasibility of and access to resources for this type of construction.

Prepare students for their roles as engaged global citizens:  Through personal encounters, new experiences, hands on creation, community collaboration, inquiry into government regulations, critical evaluation of materials and resources, and an overall objective of contributing to the sustainability of humanity, this experience in Argentina will help deepen the understanding of what it means to be a global citizen.

Impact on SUA Community

Upon return, students from this Learning Cluster will attempt to impact the SUA community in an innovative manner that will shed light upon the environmental inquiries that are still very much alive on-campus. Once we learn the techniques of building an earth structure, we will be able to impart this knowledge to those who are willing to learn and take action. Bringing awareness of our LC project to the SUA community will allow for a gradual shift in the way our generation perceives sustainable living in the United States, and especially, in Orange County. Understanding, for instance, the implications of renewable and solar energy will help Soka students realize that we each have the capacity to push the “eco-friendly–go green” movement even further. This will instill a sense of pride in our students to contribute to the global community on an exceedingly prudent and moral level. These earth ships prove that humanity is capable of “doing more”. SUA can be one of the first campuses to realize the potential and effectiveness of these living standards.
Soka takes great pride in the Language and Culture Program. Close to 90% of our LC class is studying the Spanish language. By traveling to Argentina to experience the culture and life in Latin America, we can share our discoveries and challenges in working in another language with fellow students back home. We envision that this LC’s travel component will empower others to better their language skills by immersing themselves in una cultura hispanohablante.
Finally, the meaning behind the word “Soka”—to create value—is also tied into our LC’s belief that through the creation of sustainable living spaces, we can create value on our own. A home is one of the most quintessential parts of being human. Humans need shelter, and creating a home can both accomplish that goal and represent part of the human identity within society. By collaborating together as a team to build this sustainable living space, this LC re-defines what value means within the home. A home is not just composed of nails, wood and paint–it can be composed of matter that we recycle, of matter that is part of the earth we live on. Giving, instead of taking is what matters most in this paradigm for sustainable dwellings. We feel that such a message will resonate with the SUA community. Can value be created within a home? Why is it important to give back? These are some of the working questions that define our Learning Cluster.
Significance of Fieldwork and Location
While abroad, this Learning Cluster will study the architectural history of Buenos Aires, as well as construct a true realization of sustainable architecture. As sustainable architecture is still in its infancy, contributing to a fully self-sustaining housing project is a rare opportunity that can influence the current perception and future of sustainable eco-housing. The structure that we will leave in Argentina will be a unique and significant step towards a more sustainable world. It will advertise itself to the local community, but we plan to spread additional awareness through an instructional documentary. While much of our studies are for the course members, this endeavor is about proving that “off the grid” living is not only possible, but cost effective and feasible. We hope to inspire and instigate future architectural experimentation and innovation.
     Buenos Aires is the heart and spirit of Argentina, and the focus of this LC. Touring the city and buildings in Argentina is vital in this critical study to decipher the distinct differences between communities within the city. Understanding Urban Development in Buenos Aires, Argentina plays a large role in understanding how sustainable housing can be successful in nearby communities.
     This LC also seeks to analyze the architectural and aesthetic styles of housing in the city, in collaboration with a local non-profit institution called Techo.Like this LC, Techo advocates the importance of strengthening urban development on social policies in impoverished areas. More pertinent to this course, Techo builds an environment where sustainable communities exist in order to improve the quality of life for those who are struggling to survive in Buenos Aires and its surrounding neighborhoods. By gaining a deeper understanding of the area as the students travel to contrasting locations, they will be able to engage with the community members and discuss how they can help impact the community on the social and cultural facet of this study. What is really at risk here is that the public in Argentina lacks awareness about sustainable
housing. This course will help them see that this is a cost-effective manner of living that is easily accessible. This study and project could truly educate and inspire Argentines to take action and improve their own quality of living.
The opportunity given to the students to travel to Argentina will profoundly affect the way in which these students comprehend the rapidly growing slums at a time in which an unstable and unforgiving economy exists for all. They are found in rural areas and as well as in populous cities such as in Buenos Aires. According to July 2004 estimates, there are about 640 precarious neighborhoods in suburban Buenos Aires, comprising of 690,000 residents and 111,000 households. The population of villas miseria in the city of Buenos Aires property doubled during the 1990s, reaching about 120,000 as of 2005, which is continuously growing today. These statistics show how important it is to study the reasons behind not only how both slums, such as “neighborhoods of misery” and cities are built and where they are located, but also of laying the foundation for the causes and reasons for why they exist. 
Assignments
Students will have hands-on experience in the design and construction of a low-impact natural building that requires little training in construction. Grade breakdown is the following: Participation on the field: 60%, Blog submissions 20%, Learning Cluster Fair participation: 20% Students will form teams according to their interests and write blog entries describing their responsibilities and accomplishments. For that purpose a website has been created:
Teams will be coordinated by Professor Crowder-Taraborrelli:
* a design team ( which will draw plans for the structure of the building)
*  a budget team (which will calculate costs for purchasing equipment and materials)
*an environmental and services team (which will asses the resources available in the area, design and install electricity and water access)
* a building team (which will coordinate the field work)
The building workshop will run from 9A.M.-5 P.M.  Plastic artist Pablo Salvadó will provide all materials and tools. A short documentary will help to educate SUA students about the practical, structural, and societal effects of living a sustainable life, as well as the positive effects on the environment and humanity.
 


Week 1

Monday Jan. 6:
ON-CAMPUS
10AM- 12PM: Review syllabus with the class and course/objective overview. Assign group and/or individual research based questions and topics for course. Discuss reading: Rock, Chapters 8 and 9, Sernau Chapter 10 (Social Inequality).
1PM-3PM: In class training session to prepare construction of adobe structure. Screening: Garbage Warrior.

Tuesday Jan 7:
ON-CAMPUS
10AM-12PM: Overview of history of urban development in Buenos Aires, Argentina since the 1970’s. Discuss Reading: Wilson, Part 1 and 3.

1PM-3PM: Overview of sustainable housing in/around Buenos Aires, Argentina (Techo website)

http://www.untechoparamipais.org/argentina/colecta2012/

Wednesday Jan 8:
ON-CAMPUS
10AM-12PM: Screening: Las manos, el barro, la casa

http://vimeo.com/42583876
1PM-3PM: Discuss documentary and implications. Discuss reading: Carns, Chapter 7 and Sanchez Chapter 1.
Form teams.

Thursday Jan 9:
ON-CAMPUS
Please update
10AM-12PM:
1PM-3PM:
Friday Jan 10:

EN-ROUTE
AM: Depart LAX

Saturday Jan 11:

ARRIVE IN
BUENOS AIRES, ARGENTINA
*Meeting time TBA depending on flight arrival.
12PM: Meet at Tomas’ apartment to discuss reading: Phillips, Chapter 14 and 16.  Teams discuss reading according to their team topic and assignment. Water, discuss reading: Ludwig, Chapter 7.

1PM: Lunch
2PM-3PM: Meet with collaborating institution, Techo representatives and conduct short interview to better understand community development in the Buenos Aires region.
5PM: Dinner
7PM: Daily Reflection on Angel.

Sunday Jan 12:
BUENOS AIRES, ARGENTINA
9AM-12PM: Architectural tour of the Center of Buenos Aires with Professor Weiss. Compare styles of construction and techniques with earth architecture and green building.
12PM-1PM: Lunch
1PM-4PM: Meet at Tomas’ apartment. Teams present list of objectives and tasks during construction of earth building. Discuss reading: Minke, Chapter 2 and 3, Fryer Chapters 4 and 5.
5PM: Dinner
7PM: Daily Reflection on Angel.

Week 2

Mon Jan 13:
BUENOS AIRES, ARGENTINA
9AM-12PM: Meet to prepare for week two and discuss travel and earth ship construction. Architectural tour of Northern part of Buenos Aires with Professor Weiss.
12PM-1PM: Lunch
1PM-3PM:  Screening: Earthship-Britanny Groundhouse
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=krWgtnJRAUg&feature=related

Visit Villa 31 (Barrio Retiro).
7PM: Dinner with plastic artist Pablo Salvadó. Daily Reflection on Angel.

Tues Jan 14:
BUENOS AIRES, ARGENTINA
9AM-12PM:  Lecture by Argentine Economist and former real state agent Alexis Dritsos: “Real estate in Buenos Aires: the affordability of housing”. . Schroder, Ogletree, Chapters 2, 3, 4, 5. Discussion with architect Mercedes Maria Weiss and Pablo Salvadó about building techniques in adobe construction.

12PM-1PM: Lunch
1PM-4PM: Design of earth building. Teams offer suggestions for building techniques.
5PM: Meeting with plastic artist Salvadó and architect Weiss to discuss plans for earth structure. Demonstration of labor— how to utilize sustainable materials for successful building. Become familiar with materials as a group.
7PM: Daily Reflection

Wednesday Jan 15:
ON-SITE
8AM: Breakfast
9AM: Depart by bus for Ingeniero Maschwitz.
10AM: Arrive at location. Meet with plastic artist Pablo Salvado, on-site architect Cristian Torlasco and Weiss. Foundation work.
12PM: Lunch
1-5PM: Continue work on draining ditch and foundation. Discuss reading: Hunter Chapter 4.
5PM: Return to city. Evaluation of costs for purchasing equipment and materials.
6PM: Dinner
8PM: Daily Reflection on Angel. Teams meet to discuss progress of earth building.

Thursday Jan 16:
ON-SITE
8AM: Breakfast
9AM: Depart by bus for Ingeniero Maschwitz.
10AM: Arrive at location. Work on project with on-site architects.
12PM: Lunch
1-5PM: Continue construction of on-site project. Wall, windows, draining.
5PM: Return to city
6PM: Dinner
8PM: Daily Reflection on Angel.

Friday January 17:
ON-SITE
10AM: Arrive at location. Work on project with on-site architects.
12PM: Lunch
1-5PM: Continue construction of on-site project.
5PM: Return to city
6PM: Dinner
8PM: Daily Reflection on Angel.

Saturday January 18:
ON-SITE
10AM: Arrive at location. Work on project with on-site architects.
12PM: Lunch
1-5PM: Continue construction of on-site project. Construction of walls, preparation of adobe.
5PM: Return to city
6PM: Dinner
8PM: Daily Reflection on Angel.

Sunday January 19:
ON-SITE
10AM: Arrive at location. Work on project with on-site architects.
12PM: Lunch
1-5PM: Continue construction of on-site project. Walls, adobe, plastering.
5PM: Return to city
6PM: Dinner
8PM: Daily Reflection

Week 3

Monday January 20:
ON-SITE
10AM: Arrive at location. Work on project with on-site architects.
12PM: Lunch
1-5PM: Continue construction of on-site project.
5PM: Return to city
6PM: Dinner
8PM: Daily Reflection

Tuesday January 21:
ON-SITE
10AM: Arrive at location. Work on project with on-site architects.
12PM: Lunch
1-5PM: Continue construction of on-site project.
5PM: Return to city. Update on progress of documentary film.
6PM: Dinner
8PM: Daily Reflection

Wednesday January 22:
ON-SITE
10AM: Arrive at location. Discuss Reading: Hunter, Chapter 5. Work on project with on-site architects.
12PM: Lunch
1-5PM: Preparation of roof structure.
5PM: Return to city
6PM: Dinner
8PM: Daily Reflection on Angel

Thursday January 23:

ON-SITE/BUENOS AIRES, ARGENTINA

May need 9th day

Friday January 24:

BUENOS AIRES, ARGENTINA

Please update

Saturday January 25:
BUENOS AIRES, ARGENTINA

Please update

Sunday January 26:
EN-ROUTE

EZE-LAX-SUA

Week 4

Monday January 27:
ON-CAMPUS
10AM-12PM: Continue to edit and work on film material.
1-3PM: Film editing continued.

Tuesday January 28:
ON-CAMPUS
10AM-12PM: Finalize any film editing needed.
1PM-3PM: Film finalizing continued.

Wednesday January 29:
ON-CAMPUS
10-12AM: Meet to discuss and launch our short film on YouTube.
1-3PM: Discuss our Learning Cluster Fair Presentation. (TBA)

End of Winter Block

*We will be filming throughout our Learning Cluster. The objective is to create a short film documentary (15-20 min) about our group and individual studies on Urban Development, Architecture, and Sustainable Housing in Buenos Aires, Argentina.

*Students will submit photo essays, personal essays, and possibly more material about their experiences with building, their time spent in the city, and the economic, social, and environmental issues they study. Students will be divided into their four groups (design, environmental, building, budget) and each group will submit a final bibliography on their assigned topic of interest.


Health and Safety

*For the following reasons, Buenos Aires is considered to be a relatively safe place to stay.

1. Health

Buenos Aires has a temperate climate that ranges from subtropical in the north and sub polar down south. During the month of January, we will be experiencing an Argentine Summer, which turns out to be relatively hot with high moisture readings. The Center for Disease Control states that Malaria should not be a concern since Buenos Aires is an urban center. It does, however, recommend for travelers to have their vaccines up to date, which will be required of all students in the group.

2. The Popularity of the Destination

According to the World Travel & Tourism Council, Buenos Aires is the second most desirable city to visit. This suggests that Buenos Aires is as safe as any other major urban hub.

3. Safety Rules and Guidelines

The students will always be required to remain in groups of 2-3 people at all times. It is recommended that all members of the core group be informed when a small group separates. It is also important that a fluent Spanish speaker be assigned to each smaller group at all times. The students will be oriented on safe practices for a major city of this type but are also expected to exercise common sense.

Language

The official spoken language in Buenos Aires, Argentina is Spanish. The sponsoring faculty, Professor Tomas Crowder-Taraborrelli, is a native Argentine, fluent in both English and Spanish. Three of the students in this Learning Cluster group are native Spanish speakers, 2 other students are fluent and about 3 are capable of understanding and communicating back fairly well.


Accompanying Faculty

Tomás Crowder-Taraborrelli, Visiting Assistant Professor of Latin American Studies,
will be the accompanying faculty. He led two successful Learning Clusters to Brazil (2010), San Diego/Tijuana (2011), and Argentina (2012). All class meetings will be held in an apartment in Buenos Aires outfitted with AV equipment.

Tomas Crowder-Taraborrelli
—————————————————————————-

Map of Buenos Aires, Argentina & Location of Property
 
Works Cited
Carns, Ted. Off on Our Own: Living Off-Grid in Comfortable Independence: One Couple’s “Learn as We Go” Journey to Self-Reliance. N.p.: St. Lynn’s, 2011. Print.
Fryer, Julie. The Complete Guide to Water Storage: How to Use Gray Water and Rainwater Systems, Rain Barrels, Tanks, and Other Water Storage Techniques for Household and Emergency Use (Back to Basics Conserving). N.p.: Atlantic, 2011. Print.
Hunter, Kaki, and Donald Kiffmeyer. Earthbag Building: The Tools, Tricks and Techniques (Natural Building Series). N.p.: New Society, 2004. Print.
Low, Setha M. Theorizing the City: The New Urban Anthropology Reader. N.p.: Rutgers UP, 1999. Print.
Ludwig, Art. Water Storage: Tanks, Cisterns, Aquifers, and Ponds for Domestic Supply, Fire and Emergency Use–Includes How to Make Ferrocement Water Tanks. N.p.: Oasis Design, 2005. Print.
Minke, Gernot. Building with Earth: Design and Technology of a Sustainable Architecture. 2nd ed. N.p.: Birkhäuser Architecture, 2009. Print.
Phillips, E. Barabara. City Lights: Urban-Suburban Life in the Global Society. N.p.: Oxford UP, 2009. Print.
Rock, David. Argentina, 1516-1987: From Spanish Colonization to Alfonsín. N.p.: University of California Press, 1987. Print.
Roy, Rob. Earth-Sheltered Houses: How to Build an Affordable Home. N.p.: New Society, 2006. Print.
Sanchez, Laura, and Alex Sanchez. Adobe Houses for Today: Flexible Plans for Your Adobe Home. N.p.: Sunstone, 2008. Print.
Schroder, Lisa, and Vince Ogletree. Adobe Homes for All Climates: Simple, Affordable, and Earthquake-Resistant Natural Building Techniques. N.p.: Chelsea Green, 2010. Print.
Sernau, Scott R. Social Inequality in a Global Age. Third ed. N.p.: Sage, 2010. Print.
Wilson, Jason. Buenos Aires: A Cultural History. N.p.: Interlink, 1999. Print.
Documentary films and instructional videos:

El barro, las manos, la casa
http://vimeo.com/41616082
http://ecocosas.com/documentales/el-barro-las-manos-la-casa-documental/

Other possible resources for student research

Earth architecture
http://www.eartharchitecture.org

1. “Tips on Building an Adobe House” . This website has sections dedicated to different aspects of building an adobe home. One of the most helpful sections is titled “Adobe Bricks.” It has step by step instructions on how to make adobe bricks which essentially make up the structure. http://desertphile.org/adobe/adobe.htm

2. Adobe Houses for Today: Flexible Plans for Your Adobe Home book for purchase: $27 .This book was mentioned in an article titled “Top Six Adobe House Building Plans and Manuals.” It covers plans for building an adobe house including many photographs and diagrams.
http://about.pricegrabber.com/search_getprod.php/masterid=950401135/search=Adobe%2BHouses%2Bfor%2BToday/rd_type=M

3. Adobe: Build it Yourself book for purchase: $29     This book was also mentioned in the article “Top Six Adobe House Building Plans and Manuals.” This one covers the building codes and energy requirements in building an adobe home.
http://about.pricegrabber.com/search_getprod.php/masterid=950348502

4. “Adobe Building Systems”  This website is titled “Adobe Building Systems.” On this particular link you will find  what amounts to a power point on the basics of building an adobe home. http://www.adobebuilding.com/Education/green%20building.html

5. Sustainable Development in Argentina
http://eau.sagepub.com/content/4/1/37.full.pdf+html
Sustainable development in Argentina analyzes why, despite having an impressive endowment of renewable and non-renewable resources, Argentina has failed to maintain its relative global position in economic, social and environmental development in recent decades. The authors summarize the main environmental problems in the country and conclude that the current trend is not unsustainable development but unsustainable underdevelopment, with increasing damage to natural resources and ecosystems and a growing incidence of poverty.

6.   Sustainable building and community organization technologies
http://search.proquest.com/docview/200023418/fulltextPDF?accountid=25347
Whilst much has changed in Argentina over the last four decades, housing remains a critical issue. Public housing schemes favor the construction of expensive homes that are accessible to few. There is an ever-growing need, therefore, to tackle the housing problem through a comprehensive approach that addresses housing, employment and local development. The Experimental Centre for Economic Housing/Association for Economic Housing (AVE/CEVE) is a non-governmental organization established over 40 years ago in the context of rapid urbanization. AVE/CEVE has worked to develop, apply and transfer a range of technical solutions to address various housing issues affecting low-income communities. Its approach encourages the active participation of residents throughout the process — both in projects for housing construction and in technology transfer processes. AVE/CEVE has developed a number of technologies and systems that seek to ensure the efficient use of energy and water resources, including a compact toilet and sink unit which results in water savings of 20%.

7.    Buenos Aires: Global Dreams, Local Crises by David J. Keeling
http://www.amazon.com/Buenos-Aires-Global-Dreams-Crises/dp/0471949353/ref=sr_1_7?ie=UTF8&qid=1349301672&sr=8-7&keywords=urban+development+argentina&tag=rnwff-20
Buenos Aires is a city of fascinating contrasts. The most southerly of the world’s great metropolises, it dominates the Argentine urban system, but is relatively isolated from the rest of Latin America and the global economic and political system. The archetypal elegance and sophistication of the Paris of the South is set against the problem of poor housing, social deprivation, and suburban sprawl. As Argentina struggles to maintain a democracy, the future stability of the region depends on how this vital, varied, and vulnerable city comes to terms with the need to restructure in the face of economic, environmental, and demographic crises. The book begins with an overview of the city’s four-hundred-year history, which forms the basis for an examination of the contemporary urban landscape. This leads to an analysis of local politics in relation to planning and housing policies that is followed by a consideration of changes in the city’s economic structures and an examination of Buenos Aires’ national, regional and global transport links. The book then turns to a detailed look at the city’s green spaces, environmental problems, and health care systems.

8.    The Influence of the World Bank on National Housing and Urban Policies: The Case of Mexico and Argentina During the 1990s (Ashgate Economic Geography Series) by Cecilia Zanetta
http://www.amazon.com/Influence-World-National-Housing-Policies/dp/0754634914/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1349301672&sr=8-1&keywords=urban+development+argentina&tag=rnwff-20
Firmly grounded on her professional work, Dr. Zanetta’s academic research is aimed at building a bridge between practice and the world of ideas to ultimately improve living conditions in developing countries. During the past ten years, she has worked extensively on development projects in many Latin and Central American countries, including Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Ecuador, El Salvador, Honduras and Peru. Her main areas of interest include urban and housing policies, decentralization, public sector modernization and sub-national governments. Dr. Zanetta is an adjunct faculty member at the Department of Geography, University of Tennessee.