SOKA UNIVERSITY’S COMMUNITY CINEMA AND INDIE LENS POP UP PRESENT THE DOCUMENTARY “LOOK & SEE: WENDELL BERRY’S KENTUCKY”

Look & See revolves around the divergent stories of several residents of Henry County, Kentucky who each face difficult choices that will dramatically reshape their relationship with the land and their community. Filmed across four seasons in the farming cycle, it blends observational scenes of farming life, interviews with farmers and community members with evocative, carefully framed shots of the surrounding landscape. Thus, in the spirit of Berry’s agrarian philosophy, Henry County itself will emerge as a character in the film – a place and a landscape that is deeply interdependent with the people that inhabit it. 

SOKA COMMUNITY CINEMA AND PBS INDIE LENS POP-UP PRESENT “DOLORES” BY PETER BRATT

With intimate and unprecedented access, Peter Bratt’s Dolores tells the story of Dolores Huerta, among the most important, yet least-known, activists in American history. Co-founder of the first farmworkers union with Cesar Chavez, she tirelessly led the fight for racial and labor justice, becoming one of the most defiant feminists of the 20th century. (Indie Lens Pop Up). Guest Panelist: Dr. Verónica Quezada (SUA).

Upcoming films, SUA Community Cinema

Dolores – March 8th (Thursday), 7 p.m., PAU 216

With intimate and unprecedented access, Peter Bratt’s Dolores tells the story of Dolores Huerta, among the most important, yet least-known, activists in American history. Co-founder of the first farmworkers union with Cesar Chavez, she tirelessly led the fight for racial and labor justice, becoming one of the most defiant feminists of the 20th century. (Indie Lens Pop Up)

http://www.pbs.org/independentlens/films/dolores/

Look and See: Wendell Berry’s Kentucky – April 5th (Thursday), 7 p.m., PAU 216

​ Look & See revolves around the divergent stories of several residents of Henry County, Kentucky who each face difficult choices that will dramatically reshape their relationship with the land and their community. Filmed across four seasons in the farming cycle, it blends observational scenes of farming life, interviews with farmers and community members with evocative, carefully framed shots of the surrounding landscape. Thus, in the spirit of Berry’s agrarian philosophy, Henry County itself will emerge as a character in the film – a place and a landscape that is deeply interdependent with the people that inhabit it. (Indie Lens Pop Up)

https://lookandseefilm.com/what-we-do/


Iris – May 3rd (Thursday), 7 p.m., PAU 216

Iris pairs the late documentarian Albert Maysles (Grey Gardens, Gimme Shelter), then 87, with Iris Apfel, the quick-witted, flamboyantly dressed 93-year-old style maven who has had an outsized presence on the New York fashion scene for decades. More than a fashion film, the documentary is a story about creativity and how a soaring free spirit continues to inspire. Iris portrays a singular woman whose enthusiasm for fashion, art and people are her sustenance. She reminds us that dressing — and indeed, life — is nothing but a grand experiment. “If you’re lucky enough to do something you love, everything else follows.” (POV).

http://www.pbs.org/pov/iris/

SOKA COMMUNITY CINEMA AND PBS INDIE LENS POP-UP PRESENT “CHASING TRANE: THE JOHN COLTRANE DOCUMENTARY” BY JOHN SCHEINFELD

SOKA COMMUNITY CINEMA AND PBS INDIE LENS POP-UP PRESENT “CHASING TRANE: THE JOHN COLTRANE DOCUMENTARY” BY JOHN SCHEINFELD 
Thursday, November 2, 2017, 7 – 9 p.m.

Set against the social, political and cultural landscape of the times, Chasing Trane brings saxophone great John Coltrane to life, as a man and an artist. The film is the definitive look at the boundary-shattering musician whose influence continues to this day. (TRT: 84 minutes)
www.coltranefilm.com
PANELIST: Professor Allison Johnson
Location Pauling Hall 216
Campus Location Pauling Hall 216
Address Soka University
1 University Drive
Aliso Viejo, CA 92656
Event Type University-Wide
Contact tcrowdertaraborrelli@soka.edu
Keywords John Coltrane, documentary, free, film, cinema, Soka University, Aliso Viejo, California,
Link www.pbs.org…

SOKA COMMUNITY CINEMA AND PBS INDIE LENS POP-UP PRESENT “I AM NOT YOUR NEGRO” BY RAOUL PECK


SOKA COMMUNITY CINEMA AND PBS INDIE LENS POP-UP PRESENT “I AM NOT YOUR NEGRO” BY RAOUL PECK

Tuesday, December 5, 2017, 7 – 9 p.m.



One of the most acclaimed films of the year and an Oscar nominee for Best Documentary, I Am Not Your Negro envisions the book James Baldwin never finished. The result is a radical, up-to-the-minute examination of race in America, using Baldwin’s original words, spoken by Samuel L. Jackson, and with a flood of rich archival material.TRT: 84 minutes

PANELIST: Professor James Spady

Location Pauling Hall 216
Campus Location Pauling Hall 216
Address Soka University
1 University Drive
Aliso Viejo, CA 92656
Event Type University-Wide
Contact tcrowdertaraborrelli@soka.edu
Keywords I am not your negro, documentary, free, film, cinema, PBS, Indie Lens, Soka University, Aliso Viejo, California,
Link www.pbs.org…

SOKA COMMUNITY CINEMA PRESENTS A PBS POV DOCUMENTARY FILM “SHALOM ITALIA”


Thursday, October 19, 2017, 7 – 9 Pm



In Shalom Italia, three Italian Jewish brothers set off on a journey through Tuscany, in search of a cave where they hid as children to escape the Nazis. Their quest, full of humor, food, and Tuscan landscapes, straddles the boundary between history and myth — a profound, funny, and endearing exploration of individual and communal memory.

Panelist: Professor Robert Allinson

SOKA COMMUNITY CINEMA PRESENTS A PBS POV DOCUMENTARY FILM “LAST MEN IN ALEPPO” BY FERAS FAYYAD



Thursday, September 28, 2017, 7 – 9 Pm Pauling 216



After five years of war in Syria, the remaining citizens of Aleppo are getting ready for a siege. Through the eyes of volunteer rescue workers called the White Helmets, Last Men in Aleppo allows viewers to experience the daily life, death and struggle in the streets, where they are fighting for sanity in a city where war has become the norm. FREE! Winner, 2017 Sundance World Cinema Grand Jury Prize for Documentary.

Panelist: Dr. Ryan Caldwell and Stephanie Cohen (Orange County Community Housing Corporation) with the special participation of Dr. Shane Barter.

http://www.occhc.org/

We will have in the audience junior high and high schools in Central and North Orange County, from Santiago High School (Garden Grove) and Ocean View High School (Huntington Beach).







Comments by SUA student:


On Thursday September 28, 2017, I went to watch Last Men in Aleppo. I was glad that to see that there was so many people there that wanted to know and were interested. The film itself was very difficult to watch. It is difficult to express all of what I felt.

Near the beginning of the film, there was a man that said “it’s not about us, it’s about the children.” We then saw how he went to the pharmacy where they told him that his daughter was malnourished and that they could not get the vitamins that she had been taking before. To see how hard he was working and fighting for his children and then to not be able to get his children the nutrients they needed to be healthy was awful. I cannot imagine his pain.

As the men gathered around at one point listening to the news, one became overwhelmed. One of his friends said “get over it, get over it… let it go, let it go.” They are in a situation that no one should ever have to be in, and yet there is no time or space to be able to express or feel their emotions. They have to repress their emotions otherwise it would all be too much. The amount of pain and disaster that they face is not something that we as humans are meant to be able to handle.

At one point, sitting on a roof looking over broken buildings, one man said “it’s unreal. it cannot be comprehended by humans or anything else.” This quote really stuck out to me because of how true it is. The White Helmets are just people. They’re volunteers. They’re not superheroes with abilities above all other humans. They’re people, just like their friends, families, and neighbors that they try to help. This is not like a job that you study and prepare for because there is no way that anyone could be prepared for this.

When the film ended, I had to leave immediately. I could not stay any longer. In class, we’ve talked about contradictions. I was reminded of that while watching this film. There were parts where we would see the “normal” daily life that would happen. People would see their friends, get married, go to school, play with their children, and go home to their families. How can this exist simultaneously in the same place with something so horrible? This truly is something that cannot be fully comprehended by humans or anything else.